Look what job Shell just posted on Friday!

[B][U]Alaska Marine Manager [/U][/B]

[U]Job Description[/U]

Upstream Americas searches for and recovers oil and natural gas across the Americas. Many of these activities are carried out as joint venture partnerships, including with national oil companies. The business is organized into four major business units along key resource development lines, which includes Deep Water, Exploration and Commercial, Heavy Oil, and Onshore Gas. Upstream Americas includes our oil sands operations, which extracts bitumen from oil sands and converts it to synthetic crude. Our wind power business is also part of this organization. Upstream Americas puts safety, sustainability, the global search for viable new energy sources and innovative technologies at the heart of how we do business.

At Shell our commitment is to satisfy the world’s need for energy with economically, socially and environmentally responsible solutions. We seek a high standard of performance, and understand that great ideas can change the world. If you want to work with a group of creative, ambitious and innovative professionals then you should consider Shell. We will provide you with the resources to put your ideas into action, worldwide opportunities to advance your career, and outstanding benefits and rewards that support your quality of life. Join us and let’s make a real difference together.

[U]Responsibilities[/U] :

As the Alaska Marine Manager, the incumbent will manage the provision of the following key assurance processes and services
Management of marine assurance processes for all vessels and drilling rigs used by UA in Alaska
To include DP assurance processes
Integration of applicable Group Standards and Processes within the Asset
Support development of an appropriate support fleet including new anchor handlers and platform supply vessels
Contributing fully to Asset marine strategy work
Supporting contract management activities within the Asset, including an extensive Contractor management and engagement programme (e.g. meetings and HSE forums), HSSE-MS audits and Management Reviews
Providing specialist advice on HSSE risks relating to shipping and marine activities and the effective monitoring of performance
Providing specialist support in the event of local crisis and/or oil spill response
Assisting with the investigation and follow-up of shipping and marine incidents with Asset involvement
Providing support and leadership on maritime issues relating to offshore and terminal interfaces, having due regard to the peculiar challenges of the Arctic environment
Assistance with and co-ordination of Internal Audits and related self-appraisals, to include planning,execution and follow-up

[U]Requirements[/U] :

First Class Certificate of Competency (Deck) preferred
Upstream Americas is involved with a broad range of offshore-related marine activities and a sound knowledge of these is required, to enable the incumbent to communicate competently with internal and external stakeholders
Demonstrable competency in conducting EP vessel inspections (including use of the OVID templates and system, assurance processes and auditing will be a great advantage in this position

[U]Experience[/U]:

Recent applicable EP experience in the following areas would be an advantage
Office-based management of daily marine logistics issues
Operational ,e.g. offshore supply vessels, anchor handling,seismic diving support, Dynamic Positioning
Projects (e.g. towing, pipelaying, MODU location moves and development of mooring plans)
Knowledge of relevant International Industry associations, and the application of published guidance e.g. IMCA, OCIMF, OGP 

[U]
Attributes:[/U]

Self-Motivated and a proven Leader
A mature professional with ability to work independently and communicate effectively
Ability to initiate, analyze and develop proposals and solutions to a wide range of shipping & marine technical and operational issues
Ability to manage and integrate with others in different functions and environments (culture, language, Business organizations).

You need not worry that I might apply…I am darned sure that Shell has plenty of nuke warheads already targeted on me. I’ll just stay clear but do hope they do get a good man with the professional knowledge and the political skills the job will demand because you know the job would be a very political one which means lots of people looking to pin the blame on you first chance they get!

Sounds like a perfect gig for my wife! She is a Kings Pointer after all…

[QUOTE=Bloodyshitcakes;79103]Sounds like a perfect gig for my wife! She is a Kings Pointer after all…[/QUOTE]

Only one things in three could have happened here

one…they didn’t even have a marine manager so far this year (which certainly explains a few things that have happened)

two…the marine manager they had became so disgusted with the whole Arctic boondoggle that he packed up and left midseason even tho Shell swore to hunt him down like a dog!

three…they took the guy they had out to behind one of the hangars at the Dutch Harbor airport and…well you can imagine the rest. Just another pilot not at the bar in the Grand Aleutian Hotel that evening!

Now I have to wonder with all his newly gained Alaska experience if Captain Niedermeyer from the DISCO will apply?

Shell will probably hire him if he does…a man like that is perfect for their culture!

I would rather be kicked in the balls than work in Alaska.

I hope most folks continue to feel that way. Alaska is not the right place for everyone. Its a land of many contrasts. Those of us who love Alaska also spend far too much time hating various places in it.

I’m hoping that my Alaska experience will soon command the premium that it should, and that half the Gulf will not suddenly fall in love with the Alaska bonus.

[QUOTE=Capt. Lee;79136]I would rather be kicked in the balls than work in Alaska.[/QUOTE]

as the old soldiers used to say in Dutch during the War…“there’s a girl behind every tree”. Just gotta find a tree up there in that God forsaken wasteland!

No Alaska is a strange land which has many parallels to the GoM. Rampant corruption at all levels of government, mafias and cabals all formed to keep out competition, lots of unedumacated drunks (I wonder what a police blotter from La Fourche Parish reads like?). Except for the topography and weather, there are even comparisons between Fourchon and Dutch Harbor. Dock space being all controlled by a very small group of companies who charge bank to use any of it, lots and lots of cranes loading and unloading vessels at all hours and mud! The difference is that Dutch has bars for thirsty crewmembers to drink in between trips! However as big as Dutch is, it is nothing compared to Fourchon in terms of $$$ flowing through the place. The Bering Sea fisheries is some of the most valuable on the planet, but it’s only a pimple compared to the riches on the OCS. Now, add a huge offshore energy find to the Alaskan Offshore and really see DH go ballistic. There are simply no other deepwater ports that can feasibly be used and with the cost to build a whole new Fourchon for the Arctic it’s never gonna happen. Dutch is the only sandbox to play in and smart money would be investing up there getting ready. Sounds like OSI already is but I’m sure Shell is fronting the cash. Anyway, both are places to swear to never return to, but inevitably one always does it seems.

So Lee, it’s been awhile, you still down South America way?

.

I read somewhere that Adak might be used since the navy has left it. Plenty of empty hangers, lots of dock space and a runway.

As I recall, OSI has been in Captains Bay since the early 80’s (or at least it use to be). There was some very limited Bering Sea exploration drilling in the mid-80’s. They tried to support some of it out of Nome (before the new dock), but that didn’t work very well. Apparently neither did the exploration. As I recall one rig was off the mouth of the Yukon.

I have been wondering where they will build a new support base for the Chukchi. Dutch is too far away (about 1000 miles) to be practical. Did they ever build the long causeway and deep water dock at the Red Dog mine? It seems like any oil major could probably swallow Cominco without much difficulty. What about Teller as a possible support base?

If they actually find a lot of oil, then its a different story. Given the kind of money that the North Slope Regional Corp has (if its not a fortune 500 company, it must be close), and the way that the feds like to throw huge sums of money money at Barrow, it not hard to envision a new $5 billion city dock in Barrow. As I recall, about 20 years ago the feds paid for a $1 billion “Utilidor” (insulated underground tunnel in permafrost) for all the utilities. That’s a lot of money to spend anywhere, much less in a Native village of probably only 3000 people up in the middle of nowhere that had no good reason to continue to exist. 20 years later, with a good reason like a big oil find, a $5 billion dock does not seem so outlandish.

As far as Prudhoe goes, if they find oil offshore there, they’ll certainly build a dock and support base there. I’ve never been to Tuktoyaktuk, but it my understanding that it was used as support base in the past.

Although the distance is a little greater, the Natives will be pushing for the oil companies to use Adak in addition to Dutch. It wouldn’t surprise me if the government makes a Native component a condition of future drilling permits. Kind of like the CDQ fisheries.

Red Dog is the nana Indian group. They have a dock but only good to about 25’ depth or so. I think they are going to shuttle stuff on landing crafts out of wainwright from what I heard.

25 feet ought to be enough. That’s better than most places in the Gulf.

http://www.nana.com/regional/resources/red-dog-mine/

Apparently the port is owned by the State of Alaska: http://www.commerce.state.ak.us/dca/commdb/CIS.cfm?Comm_Boro_Name=Red+Dog+Mine

Interesting never knew that. They should make a deal with them for re-supplying there.

I’ve heard lots talk about Adak. Space is there dock is there runways for jets is there. Although the talk was about it being the major freight hub. To get gear north. Source shell logistics. Wouldn’t hold breath on those guys they can barely even handle a Harvey boat with 6 picks coming from OSI to the disco…

[QUOTE=c.captain;79139]No Alaska is a strange land …[/QUOTE]

Ain’t that the truth!

Appalachia by the sea is what I call it. It is kind of funny in a sick way but the Last Frontier is filled with strong independent characters who cling so hard to the government tit they have made welfare a bootstrap program by comparison.

Run up the inside passage in Southeast and you know when a town is around the bend because you can see the Federal Building sticking up above the trees, unless it is blocked by the State Building of course. Nothing gets built or done unless the federal funding is in place first. When Sarah said she could see Russia from her house she really meant she could see Russian style socialism. Up there it wears a set of Carharts and claims it don’t need no stinkin gummint … mind you, they say that on the way to cash their permanent fund check so they can buy a new snow machine.

[QUOTE=jmad;79169]I’ve heard lots talk about Adak. Space is there dock is there runways for jets is there. Although the talk was about it being the major freight hub. To get gear north. Source shell logistics. Wouldn’t hold breath on those guys they can barely even handle a Harvey boat with 6 picks coming from OSI to the disco…[/QUOTE]

Yes it has the infrastructure but it’s so far out in the chain and with Aleutian Island weather that is a big deal! Still, other than remoteness, it would make an excellent base of operations.

[QUOTE=Steamer;79176]Ain’t that the truth!

Appalachia by the sea is what I call it. It is kind of funny in a sick way but the Last Frontier is filled with strong independent characters who cling so hard to the government tit they have made welfare a bootstrap program by comparison.[/QUOTE]

Oh how Uncle Ted used to take care of his people…what a Pork Barrel master he was and only didn’t get the kingship because Richard Byrd was better as bringin home the bacon (but not by much!). And how corrupt Uncle Ted was too, didn’t take much and he’d give you any favor you might whisper in his ear. The giving of IFQs of the Alaskan groundfish and crab by a select group of well connected fishermen and seafood processors was one of the biggest examples of inequitable transfer of the public wealth to the private ownership ever in US history. Not one dollar in royalties ever paid for the taking of this resource and no payment to the people for the transfer of it. Just GIVEN to them! These select few OWN it in perpetuity and can sell it at whim. Men who were had tens of millions in wealth suddenly had hundreds of millions…just like that! Turned my stomach that did and destroyed the Federal regulated fisheries in Alaska all under the guise that it would make things safer for crew. Did the crewmembers ever get any of this booty? HELL NO! A few captains got a pittance but crew got effing HOSED!

I was so happy when the great Uncle Ted died in the plane crash…I hope he had sheer terror going thru him in those last seconds. WHAT AN EFFING ASSHOLE!

Ted, Lisa, Frank, Sarah … what a cast of characters! There must be something in the water up there that does something particularly weird to what passes for brains in the type of whackjob personality that goes into politics.

[QUOTE=rshrew;79160]Interesting never knew that. They should make a deal with them for re-supplying there.[/QUOTE]

The Red Dog mine dock itself is 17 miles south of Kivalina inside the Cape Krusenstern National Monument. Maybe that’s why its state owned — not on Native Corp. land. From the google satellite photos and other info available online, it appears that they never built the long causeway to a deepwater dock, and continue to use the lightering barges. The photos of the loaded barges suggest about a 20 foot draft to me. The dock is out in the open and unprotected, so its a good thing that the weather is usually so nice up there in the summer.

Landing craft off the beach in Wainwright can handle flown in fresh groceries and smaller things like that, but that isn’t going to work for heavy stuff like drilling mud and drill pipe.

[QUOTE=c.captain;79183]Oh how Uncle Ted used to take care of his people…what a Pork Barrel master he was and only didn’t get the kingship because Richard Byrd was better as bringin home the bacon (but not by much!). And how corrupt Uncle Ted was too, didn’t take much and he’d give you any favor you might whisper in his ear. The giving of IFQs of the Alaskan groundfish and crab by a select group of well connected fishermen and seafood processors was one of the biggest examples of inequitable transfer of the public wealth to the private ownership ever in US history. Not one dollar in royalties ever paid for the taking of this resource and no payment to the people for the transfer of it. Just GIVEN to them! These select few OWN it in perpetuity and can sell it at whim. Men who were had tens of millions in wealth suddenly had hundreds of millions…just like that! Turned my stomach that did and destroyed the Federal regulated fisheries in Alaska all under the guise that it would make things safer for crew. Did the crewmembers ever get any of this booty? HELL NO! A few captains got a pittance but crew got effing HOSED!

I was so happy when the great Uncle Ted died in the plane crash…I hope he had sheer terror going thru him in those last seconds. WHAT AN EFFING ASSHOLE![/QUOTE]

REPLY I guess you never hoisted a few beers with Ted at Humpies? Ted was a very down to earth and likeable guy. He knew just about everyone that had been in Alaska for a few years. Yes, he was corrupt, but no more so than most politicians. And he certainly was a close second to Robert Byrd when it came to bringing in absurd amounts of pork. While I am normally gleeful when corrupt politicians get taken down for corruption, I was actually sad when they ruined Ted over relatively minor corruption (Bill Allen at Veco sent his crew over to do a little free work at Ted’s house in Girdwood), big deal. However, a light plane crash during a fishing trip to Bristol Bay at age 85 sounds like as good a way to go as any.

I certainly agree with you about the fisheries give away. What is worse, they gave most of the quota to the Norwegian owned and controlled factory trawlers. Hva fi faen hellveta ! ! !

Plane crash on the way to a gd fishing trip at age 85.

It does indeed sound like a better way “to go” than many …

That is a “good” fishing trip …