Is it a ship or a boat?


#1

Ok, I’ve always subscribed to the thought (maybe I was taught at school?) that ships are big enough to carry boats, and boats are small enough to be carried by ships. But in surfing around gCaptain today I found this photo of the USS Cole being carried by a heavy-lift:

Now the Cole is certainly a ship and so is the heavy-lift carrying her so my definition must be wrong?? is their any scientific or historic answer to the question ‘what is the difference between a boat and a ship’ or is the answer just a matter of opinion?


#2

Never looked at it relative to dimensions. Hell, Christopher Columbus sailed the Pinta…or Santa Maria at 74’ long. Those were ships sailing the Atlantic in those days.

I’ve always classified a ship as how it was manned based on the hierarchy, where it could go, and what it did. Hence the word “ship”. Never seen a boat that needs a Captain, Chief Engineer, three mates and three assistants capable of ocean transit shipping something in its holds.


#3

I think a ship is used to move large amounts of cargo and a boat is for fun.


#4

My ship doesn’t move any cargo and I know many boats that would not be fun to work on.


#5

[B][I]Ship:[/I][/B]
[B][I]–noun [/I][/B]
<TABLE class=luna-Ent><TBODY><TR><TD class=dnindex width=35>1.</TD><TD>a vessel, esp. a large oceangoing one propelled by sails or engines.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE class=luna-Ent><TBODY><TR><TD class=dnindex width=35>2.</TD><TD>[I]Nautical[/I]. <TABLE class=luna-Ent><TBODY><TR><TD class=dnindex width=25>a.</TD><TD>a sailing vessel square-rigged on all of three or more masts, having jibs, staysails, and a spanker on the aftermost mast.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE class=luna-Ent><TBODY><TR><TD class=dnindex width=25>b.</TD><TD>[I]Now Rare[/I]. a bark having more than three masts. </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
[B][I]Boat:[/I][/B]
[B][I]-noun [/I][/B]<TABLE class=luna-Ent><TBODY><TR><TD class=dnindex width=35>1.</TD><TD>a vessel for transport by water, constructed to provide buoyancy by excluding water and shaped to give stability and permit propulsion.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE class=luna-Ent><TBODY><TR><TD class=dnindex width=35>2.</TD><TD>a small ship, generally for specialized use: [I]a fishing boat. [/I]</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE class=luna-Ent><TBODY><TR><TD class=dnindex width=35>3.</TD><TD>a small vessel carried for use by a large one, as a lifeboat: [I]They lowered the boats for evacuation. [/I]</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE class=luna-Ent><TBODY><TR><TD class=dnindex width=35>4.</TD><TD>a ship.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE class=luna-Ent><TBODY><TR><TD class=dnindex width=35>5.</TD><TD>a vessel of any size built for navigation on a river or other inland body of water.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

Appears as if the distinction is made where they operate. Ship’s operate on the ocean whereas boats operate in inland bodies of water. That’s my guess!


#6

Hmm… I’m no expert either, but while in the Navy was firmly taught that

[I]“A boat is any floating craft that can be placed on the deck of a ship.”[/I]

However, I suspect that definition involves the use of cranes or davits. I was serving aboard USS Pensacola (LSD-38) when I was taught that definition. We felt that flooding our well deck enabled us to float aboard nearly anything that would fit. But, I recall an HTC telling me that he didn’t consider Amtraks or LCU’s to be boats even though we were carrying them on our deck.

Hence, the USS Cole would not be considered a “boat” because she was floated aboard, not hoisted aboard.


#7

Oh, I though I had settled this question.

I propose the scoring system below. Take the quiz below and see if your vessel is rated correctly.

  1. How do you get aboard the vessel?
    a. Step carefully on the center line with both hand on the gunnel.
    b. Step or jump across
    c. A gangplank, stairs, or a ladder
    d. The accommodation ladder.

  2. How do you measure fuel?
    a. Don’t use fuel - low carbon foot print
    b. read the gauge, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, full
    c. By gallons
    d. Convert cubic meters to tons using temperature and density corrections.

  3. What’s for lunch?
    a. Energy bar.
    b. A sandwich and drink from the cooler/thermos
    c. It depends on who did the shopping.
    d. I don’t know, what’s on the menu?

The rest I posted at Ship or Boat here.


#8

[quote=CampbellsChunkySoupra;14821][B][I]Boat:[/I][/B]
[B][I]-noun [/I][/B]2. a small ship, generally for specialized use[/quote]

*question…how small is a ship when it is a boat and conversely how big is boat when it is a ship?

*to be or not to be…that is the question!


#9

Submarines, by tradition, are referred to as boats. Even 18,000 ton ballistic missile submarines (which were built at the Electric BOAT Company)… And they cannot be carried by a ship. But those boats have a Captain and a Chief Engineer. So those definitions don’t work. Hmmmm…

Ahhh, the age old ship vs. boat debate.


#10

Well I am not at home to find the refferance I believe it is in the original blue seamans books but maybe wrong
A ship is any thing floating over 300 fet long a sub is a boat because you don’t have an admiral on board just a captian
I argueed this and found it in a book on a USNS boat and won some money

I’ll look for it in my books when I get home


#11

I hear this from an old salty captain:
"A boat is more affected by wind than current, and a ship is more affected by current than wind."
Which only made marginal sense when he said it, and actually doesn’t make too much more sense now.


#12

Boat or a Ship? Guess it comes down to what sounds better…

A [B]catch phrase[/B] (or [B]catchphrase[/B]) is a phrase or expression recognized by its repeated utterance. Such phrases often originate in popular culture and in the arts, and typically spread through a variety of mass media (such as literature and publishing, motion pictures, television and radio), as well as word of mouth.

This is about the best answer I came come up with.


#13

Well, I guess this particular discussion was inevitable on this site. The supreme Court had a similar problem trying to define pornography. One justice said that he could not define pornography, but he knew it when he saw it. I guess it works with the boat -vs- ship debate also.


#14

[QUOTE=captrob;14860]Well, I guess this particular discussion was inevitable on this site. The supreme Court had a similar problem trying to define pornography. One justice said that he could not define pornography, but he knew it when he saw it. I guess it works with the boat -vs- ship debate also.[/QUOTE]

Perfect answer!


#15

That one is easier to define. All you have to do it go into the start menu, go to “My documents”, and look in the folder marked “porn”

edited to add: Go to folder options first and check “show” hidden folders


#16

[quote=anchorman;14877]That one is easier to define. All you have to do it go into the start menu, go to “My documents”, and look in the folder marked “porn”

edited to add: Go to folder options first and check “show” hidden folders[/quote]

Those folders are found on both ship AND boat computers.


#17

In the USCG they teach you that anything over 65’ is a “CUTTER” not a ship. All the rest are just “boats”. I guess they don’t have ships. :confused:


#18

[quote=Capt. Fran;14838]
Which only made marginal sense when he said it, and actually doesn’t make too much more sense now.[/quote]

Ha! Isn’t that always the way with those old salts?

The “I know it when I see it” doesn’t do it for me, neither a ship or a boat diverts the blood flow, but that seem off subject.

How about this definition:

A ship is a vessel designed to routinely make ocean passages, with a professional crew living permanently on board.


#19

how about these definitons for[B] [U]OUR[/U][/B] “intents and purpose”?

boat: vessel that requires a “limited” tonnage license to operate.

ship: vessel that requires a “unlimited” tonnage license to operate.

**everything else that floats is toys!


#20

The two key things about a boat is, I think, that when the trip is over the crew gets off, and it is not designed to cross oceans. Using tonnage doesn’t work because a ferry can be very large and still be a “ferry boat” Washington State Ferry for example. It is a boat because it cannot make an ocean passage and the crew does not live on board. On the Alaska State Ferry system ferries the crew lives aboard but with the exception of the Tustemena (which would be a small ship) they can not routinely make ocean passages. A sub would fit in the boat category because they don’t make a suitable "home"The crew does not stay aboard when the ship is in port, I understand they use a blue/gold crews. Liveaboards are not ships because generally it is the owners, not a paid crew who live aboard.