How would you rate your long term career satisfaction and overall well being?

Trips to sea are like the “Little Girl with a little curl”

There was a little girl,
Who had a little curl,
Right in the middle of her forehead.

And when she was good,
She was very, very good,
But when she was bad, she was horrid!

I’m working with a 2a/e right now who went to a maritime academy back east and he did roustabout work in his off time to pay for school. Came out with pretty small debts and a 3a/e. not sure if that is an option now or not.

Also, I went to SMA, but I really wanted to go to a 4 year academy, probably would have chose cal Maritime, but I was in my 30’s getting married and needed to provide for two people so I chose SMA. Worked out great for me, but thinking that in about another year I could have been coming out of school with a 3a/e kinda hurts. It’s gonna take me longer than that to work up to my 3a/e from where I am now.

I think you need to just try to get on ANY boat right now as the school option is pretty much finished for you this year. Then after a few months you should know whether you want to continue working or go to school.

[QUOTE=“oregonblitzkrieg;118293”]I could go up to Seattle and fill out some applications. One company sails from Seattle to Alaska and back, 24 days each trip. Sounds like a good place to start, but they don’t have many boats so I’m sure the competition is stiff. I was thinking about putting on my application that I’d work the first trip for free if they hired me. Or I could go to Louisiana and try my luck there.[/QUOTE]

I expect that any company sailing outside the boundary lines (like Seattle to Alaska) will require you to have BST at a minimum. If you have that you should try getting a job in the Gulf. Also, most if the companies in the Pacific North West are union.

[QUOTE=“Kingrobby;118330”]I’m working with a 2a/e right now who went to a maritime academy back east and he did roustabout work in his off time to pay for school. Came out with pretty small debts and a 3a/e. not sure if that is an option now or not.

Also, I went to SMA, but I really wanted to go to a 4 year academy, probably would have chose cal Maritime, but I was in my 30’s getting married and needed to provide for two people so I chose SMA. Worked out great for me, but thinking that in about another year I could have been coming out of school with a 3a/e kinda hurts. It’s gonna take me longer than that to work up to my 3a/e from where I am now.

I think you need to just try to get on ANY boat right now as the school option is pretty much finished for you this year. Then after a few months you should know whether you want to continue working or go to school.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, what Kingrobby said. Go get a job on ANY boat right now. Do a year and at the end if that year…decide where you want to go. Any academy will get you there the fastest. ENGINEERING IS WHERE IT’S AT FO SHO!! If I could do it all over again…I’d go straight to an academy and enroll in the engineering program. There are way more opportunities for them vs deck. It’s 4 years but sooooo fuckin’ worth it.

[QUOTE=Kingrobby;118330]
I think you need to just try to get on ANY boat right now as the school option is pretty much finished for you this year. Then after a few months you should know whether you want to continue working or go to school.[/QUOTE]

PNW jobs are heavily influenced by fishing seasons. Are there “low” and “high” seasons for finding entry level work in Louisiana or is it pretty much year round bustle? Also do they care if you live in the state, anything wrong with flying in and out after you’ve completed your trips?

Sorry, don’t know much about Louisiana as I’ve never worked on a boat out of there. But tons of people fly in and out. Just depends on what the company/job offers. If its a week on week off job, probably not gonna be convenient for you or them. I know of at least 8 Washington guys that fly out every 3-4 weeks for work.

If your crew change day is Tuesday , Don’t! Make your flight for Tuesday night. Nothing pisses off a personnel manager or a shipmate more than having to cater to someone who lives three time zones away. We get it that you may have to travel further than others who are local. We get it. Don’t screw us over. Some larger companies deal with this better than others. Do your research. Your crew change will almost always affect someone else’s. Fact of life.

Sorry, too much sun and two bottles of a decent Cabernet. Carry on.

[QUOTE=captrob;118359]If your crew change day is Tuesday , Don’t! Make your flight for Tuesday night. Nothing pisses off a personnel manager or a shipmate more than having to cater to someone who lives three time zones away. We get it that you may have to travel further than others who are local. We get it. Don’t screw us over. Some larger companies deal with this better than others. Do your research. Your crew change will almost always affect someone else’s. Fact of life.[/QUOTE]

I wouldn’t interfere with other peoples’ schedules on purpose. But what if some other guy calls in sick? Would they ask me to take over for him? Would be hard to do from 3 time zones away. :cool:

Seriously man, kinda pointless to be worrying about all the “ifs” and “buts” right now. Sometimes people have to stay over a few days. Just get your stuff in order and go try and get a job. Don’t be worried about all the minuscule issues of the job you don’t have. Most big companies will fly you out or pay for you to book your own flights, most pay a good wage, and some will give you all the training you want. You just need to go work for a few months to get a taste of it. Maybe you’ll like the boat, but hate the work or vice versa. Or maybe the work will make you decide to go to the wheelhouse. You just need to get on any boat you can.

Just get a goddamn job somewhere on something. Roll the dice and make a decision, get back to us after you work a few months. Enough said!

[QUOTE=oregonblitzkrieg;118365]I wouldn’t interfere with other peoples’ schedules on purpose. But what if some other guy calls in sick? Would they ask me to take over for him? Would be hard to do from 3 time zones away. :cool:[/QUOTE]
They aren’t going to fly you in to save the day. Most likely some other wunderkind will be much closer to the office and they will get the extra pay for working over.
If you are off and don’t want to be called in, don’t answer the phone when it rings.

[QUOTE=z-drive;118368]Just get a goddamn job somewhere on something. Roll the dice and make a decision, get back to us after you work a few months. Enough said![/QUOTE]

I hear you and that’s what I’m going to do. I want to go the engineering route but I’m going to put on my applications that I will take an OS deckhand position if that’s all they’ve got available, to increase my chances of getting hired. That being said, I also want to make the most advantageous use of my time if I’m hired as an OS instead of a wiper, with a view to my longer term goal of getting unlimited engineer licenses. Since aspiring assistant engineers can use 180 days of deckhand experience on vessels over 100 GTR as part of the sea time requirement, I want to get the most bang for my buck and work on a ship like this, just in case I don’t secure an entry level engineering department job. Some people have said just take any job you can get to get your foot in the door. I will if need be, though working as an OS deckhand on a ship of less than 100 GRT will not help me along the engineering path, though it may open up opportunities to switch positions later on. Looks like I’ll need to book alot of time on ships over 4000 HP as well. Should I be picky about HP and tonnage? Thought I read somewhere on these forums that it’s hard to find vessels over 4000 HP to work on.

1080 days of service in the engine room, WITH
540 days as a QMED or equivalent supervisory position.
[B]Service gained in the deck department on vessels of appropriate tonnage may substitute for
up to 25% or 180 days (whichever is less) of the required service.[/B]

[QUOTE=“oregonblitzkrieg”]

Should I be picky about HP and tonnage?

You should not really be picky about either until you gain some valuable industry experience/knowledge by actually working onboard commercial vessels. I doubt you would have the luxury to anyways with just an entry level MMC, no BST and no relevant maritime experience. My advice would be to take a job on anything that floats or nearly floats until you gain said experience and some cash flow for BST, then you would likely have more options. Until then look at dinner boats, tugs, ferries, other large or small vessels and large companies or small companies. Work the details out later. And to answer your earlier question about knocking on doors outside the Gulf, absolutely the best way to go. I was looking for work on tugs in SF bay in 2005/2006. Completely ignored by all companies over the phone. Walked in and shook hands with the dispatchers at 3 different companies with Carhartts on and grip packed for lunchbox jobs and found work at all 3. Had to eventually say no to the other 2 and stick with 1 because they kept me busy enough. In my opinion, it’s the only way to go. At least until you have been around a while and have a more extensive network. It is definitely who you know sometimes.

Not building any sea time at the house. Take the first step. Get on a boat. I repeat. Get on a boat. Worry about all the BS later. Start anywhere. Just get on. Might not be the top tier outfits all the cool kids talk about, but sea time is sea time.

[QUOTE=captrob;118382]Not building any sea time at the house. Take the first step. Get on a boat. I repeat. Get on a boat. Worry about all the BS later. Start anywhere. Just get on. Might not be the top tier outfits all the cool kids talk about, but sea time is sea time.[/QUOTE]

This seems to be the consensus amongst the experienced here and is my view as well. Seems people are not willing go to work unless the time “counts” for an endorsement of some kind. You have to wonder about the level of commitment they are willing to make. When looking for work, any commercial experience on a vessel is better then none. There is also the benefit of building a network.

Success on a boat requires more then a specific skill set,it requires the right mindset and attitude… A single recommendation, verbal or written, from a captain is worth far more then any number from shore side outfits.

Coming back for round two separates the dreamers from the doers.

The flying part is pretty cut and dry, fly in the day before. It sucks and you won’t get paid for that day, but it is what it is. As far as working over to cover someone, usually they have people who have requested to work over to cover that. I would be shocked if they ask you to fly in early at the last second to cover a boat that’s not yours.

The bottom line is find a job first, some where, anywhere, then worry about the travel.

FWIW, it’s usually a lot easier to get on with a big operator if you are already employed in the industry. A personnel manager is much more likely to hire a guy from another company than give a chance to some stranger with zero experience from BFE. At least he can be reasonably sure that the guy from brand x marine already knows that the business is for him, and won’t drag up half way through the hitch because he heard that Jodie is sniffing around the ponderosa while he’s been gone.

[QUOTE=captrob;118359]If your crew change day is Tuesday , Don’t! Make your flight for Tuesday night. Nothing pisses off a personnel manager or a shipmate more than having to cater to someone who lives three time zones away. We get it that you may have to travel further than others who are local. We get it. Don’t screw us over. Some larger companies deal with this better than others. Do your research. Your crew change will almost always affect someone else’s. Fact of life.[/QUOTE]

While I agree with flying in the day before, in all my years of sailing I have found that the last guy to show up for Crew Change is the one that lives the closest.

Now, I did have a relief that lived in Northern Maine in the seven or eight years that we worked opposite he missed quite a few Crew Changes due to the weather. One time really sticks in my memory. He call the boat 4 days before Crew Change to tell me that he might be late as they were calling for a major snow storm. My Captain told him that if he knows that there will be bad weather then he better fly out early. He showed up but was pissed. This is the same guy that would bitch if my was late even if it was not our fault, (launch late or traffic).

I have always lived close enough to drive to work. The furthest that I lived was a 7-8 hour drive and I always left early enough to make sure that I would be there in plenty of time.

When my company started paying to fly guys for Crew Change it really got bad because they would go for the cheapest price and that caused a lot of problems for the guys that had to book flights home as you never knew when your relief would get there.

[QUOTE=“uninspected;118279”]Ocean Peace Inc.

Oiler position

-This is a catcher processor operating in the bearing sea 10+ months out of the year.
-Rotation is typically 60 days however it can range from 50 to 70 days.
-Pay is based on crew shares, you get a precentage of the fish caught.
-Annual income is >80K

-Must posses some engineering skills. Previous fishing vessel experience preferred but not required.

  • Aside from your basic propulsion, power generation and distribution you will be working with a large hydraulic system, large R-22 refrigeration plant, Desalination plant, MSD system and some basic electrical repairs.
  • Welding skills a plus
    -Must be motivated and a self starter
  • All equipment onboard is maintained,repaired and rebuilt by the engineer’s onboard. Boat has a 2 month ship yard period in Seattle Wa.

oceanpeaceinc.com

If interested PM me.[/QUOTE]

There is your opening, the balls in your court.