HELP NEEDED: Link between Gross Tonnage and Deceleration

HELP NEEDED: Link between Gross Tonnage and Deceleration

Hi,

I am a final year undergraduate from the National University of Singapore, majoring in Civil Engineering. I am doing some research for my Final Year Project, which requires the information described in the title.

Basically, I am looking to value-add to existing ship domain models, by introducing the element of deceleration when making speed/course changes during any point of the vessel’s course. This would of course involve certain key terms like advance/transfer, ship’s tactical diameter etc. I earnestly seek advise and help from any one who is able to direct me to the relevant information (maybe send me results from sea trials conducted for various ships?), and also please feel free to give me directions on how I can improve on my thesis! Thank you!

You may contact me via bealeliu@gmail.com

it is not simply gross tonnage but is total wetted area and displacement working together. A heavy vessel with little total wetted area would decelerate much slower than one with a huge wetted area. I would focus your research on coefficients of drag. Also a long vessel with narrow beam will encounter less resistance than a short one with a wide beam and decelerate less if both have the same displacement.

[QUOTE=c.captain;131517]it is not simply gross tonnage but is total wetted area and displacement working together. A heavy vessel with little total wetted area would decelerate much slower than one with a huge wetted area. I would focus your research on coefficients of drag. Also a long vessel with narrow beam will encounter less resistance than a short one with a wide beam and decelerate less if both have the same displacement.[/QUOTE]

hey, thank you for the reply and tip. any idea where I can get these numbers? I was thinking sea trials would have these numbers recorded, but will I be able to get my hands on these?

[QUOTE=c.captain;131517]it is not simply gross tonnage but is total wetted area and displacement working together. A heavy vessel with little total wetted area would decelerate much slower than one with a huge wetted area. I would focus your research on coefficients of drag. Also a long vessel with narrow beam will encounter less resistance than a short one with a wide beam and decelerate less if both have the same displacement.[/QUOTE]

hmmm, I have a set of raw data with the gross tonnage, LOA, breadth, height above waterline, x & y coordinates linked to time…can you suggest something I can work on to work out plausible quantifiable empirical relationships based on those data?

[QUOTE=Beale Liu JieXiong;131663]hmmm, I have a set of raw data with the gross tonnage, LOA, breadth, height above waterline, x & y coordinates linked to time…can you suggest something I can work on to work out plausible quantifiable empirical relationships based on those data?[/QUOTE]

no, I am not a naval architect so you have to do your own legwork finding this data. ain’t gonna be readily available here

[QUOTE=Beale Liu JieXiong;131663]hmmm, I have a set of raw data with the gross tonnage, LOA, breadth, height above waterline, x & y coordinates linked to time…can you suggest something I can work on to work out plausible quantifiable empirical relationships based on those data?[/QUOTE]

This is outside my area of expertise but I would guess that looking at displacement would be more useful then gross tons.