Deciding to become a merchant mariner

I’m deciding on a career. is a merchant mariner a good career? pros? cons? i would greatly appreciate some insight.

i’d be a third mate after graduation. so that’s where i’d start my career.

[quote=KentCraig;27644]I’m deciding on a career. is a merchant mariner a good career? pros? cons? i would greatly appreciate some insight.

i’d be a third mate after graduation. so that’s where i’d start my career.[/quote]

Did you see Lonesome Dove? Lippy had the job I would have if I had it to do all over again…

Welcome to the forum KC.
It’s difficult for young men to be gone from the girlfriends or wife and children. That said whatever you do if there is passion for it you will do well. Personally, I love being at sea. I wish you the best in your quest.

Spend a week reading through this forum…

Now that is funny.

KentCraig,

If interested in getting your merchant marine education/training through a maritime academy - I encourage you to visit our website and Twitter pages.

You will see on those pages information from our graduates and current students that will assist you.

Feel free to contact me if you have questions.

I wish you well with your future.

The reality is the maritime industry has been hit just as hard if not harder then all other segments of the economy. I know people who graduated from CMA in the class of 2009 back in April who still haven’t worked in the maritime industry and have had no leads in that direction. I haven’t worked as a ships officer myself for almost a year

My company has recently hired 3 new CMA grads and only one is on a ship as an AB, and the other two are working at the shore support facility…

Engineers are in demand, always.

Hi- welcome aboard.

You ask if being a sailor is a good career. That depends on what you consider to be a good career.

What attracted you to being a merchant marine?

There’s a lot of good advice in this thread- especially what 10talents said.

I love being at sea- but it’s not for everyone.

Pluses?

High income potential, low expenses (you can save money) travel, the ability to meet lots of people, experience new cultures- and have an adventurous life.

But- do you want to work 7 days a week for weeks/months at a time? Can you live in a tiny room with people you may or may not like?

Are you willing to follow orders- even if you don’t always agree?

Are you willing to take other people’s lives into your hands everyday?

Can you stay sober for weeks at a time?

Are you willing to go to school for years- and spend your offtime going to more classes- with no guarantee of a 3rd mate’s job? What if you have to work as a deckhand first?

Are you willing to put off having a committed relationship- or leave your girlfriend wife alone for weeks/months?

If you go deck- are you willing to commit years of your life to a career- that doesn’t translate well to a transition to most land jobs? (Engineers don’t have so much of a problem)

Some thoughts to ponder…

I recommend you do a forum search- and contact Fuji, as well as the folks at PMI, CMA, etc.

If you’re young- i also recommend working a summer or two on a boat to see if you like it- before you commit.

Anthony

[QUOTE=tengineer;27679]Engineers are in demand, always.[/QUOTE]

Depends on the type

Did you see Lonesome Dove? Lippy had the job I would have if I had it to do all over again.

Did you see Boogie Nights…Dirk Diggler had the job I would have if I had to do it all over again

the salt got in my blood early,been trying to get it out since i got married,it has not worked,If I had to do it again I would have never steped foot on a boat. do you know 90 percent of seaman are divorced and 5 percent have a policy with there wife that Jodi will be gone when he comes home. ofcourse this trip has sucked for me cause i am stuck with some guys that i dont like. But when the sun is raising over the horizon and your at full steam with a 6 foot long period swell rolling under the hull,there is nothing like it.

[QUOTE=10talents;27646]Welcome to the forum KC.
It’s difficult for young men to be gone from the girlfriends or wife and children. That said whatever you do if there is passion for it you will do well. Personally, I love being at sea. I wish you the best in your quest.[/QUOTE]

I second the sentiments of your post, 10. Do what you love and you’ll never work another day.

By the way, word on the street is that it’s also difficult for young women to be gone from girlfriends. Er, um, I meant boyfriends. No, really.

Jody has his side of the closet, I have mine…and never the twain shall meet…

She treats me good when I’m home, what do I care what she does when I ain’t.

You guys are a barrel of laughs. Now we need to get Anchorman and Capt. Lee going on this thread.

Being a merchant mariner is not to everyone, it’s basic a life style, being at sea for long period of time and getting your butt kicked on rough seas it’s pretty miserable sometimes, but I love it! For me there’s no other thing I would like to do! But with these new regulations and ruling which may come in effect soon, I don’t know how long I will be doing it. But if you have this passion in your heart like most of us here do, then dive right in head first.

I did it for ten years and am still proud of what I accomplished. It shaped me for what I am now. It also got me used to being in situations that may be uncomfortable to the average person, but with the travel and situations that I was put into when I was younger, they are not so difficult. Now, I still work in the industry; I just don’t sail in any supervisorial capacity if I am ever onboard a vessel. Much of what a normal young person experiences is missed, however. But I am not so sure that this is a bad thing. Especially when weighed against what is gained.