At least 3 dead after whale watching boat carrying 27 sinks

Canadian authorities said at least three people were killed Sunday when a whale watching boat with 27 people on board capsized off Vancouver Island.
The Joint Rescue Coordination Centre confirmed that the vessel made a mayday call shortly before 4 p.m. PDT Sunday near Tofino, British Columbia.
Jenn Hamilton, a spokeswoman for British Columbia Emergency Health Services, said the three were confirmed dead “shortly after this incident happened.” She did not have further details on the deceased, including their identities or nationalities.
Hamilton added that five ambulances had been dispatched to Tofino’s dock and many off-duty paramedics had gone to help.
CBC News reported that four passengers had been hospitalized, while five others were being treated on site by first responders after spending time in the water. It was not clear whether all the passengers had been accounted for.
It was not immediately clear how far offshore the vessel was when it capsized, but witness Rami Touffaha told CBC the boat could not be seen from the shore when it went down.
“You could see the smaller boats going back and forth to try and help bring people back to shore,” he said.
Touffaha added that the weather on Vancouver Island Sunday was sunny and fine.
“The waters weren’t choppy so I don’t see what could have caused the boat to sink,” he said, “but you never know in these waters unfortunately.”
Tofino is located on the western edge of Vancouver Island, approximately 175 miles west of the city of Vancouver.

John Forde, of the Tofino Whale Centre told Canada’s Global News the same: “The sea was [9.8 to 13 feet], a fairly big sea, but not much wind or too unusual for the conditions we deal with on a regular basis out here.”

Local fishing guide Lance Desilets, who runs Lance’s Sport Fishing Adventures, said Plover Point is a popular spot for boats to stop and observe marine life. “My guess is they were watching sea lions. I guess they got too close and hit the rocks,” he told the Globe and Mail.

This is not the first whale-watching tragedy to happen in the area. In 1998, another boat from the same company sank near Tofino, killing a German tourist and the ship’s captain.

A “Capsize”…
“13 foot seas”…
“The water’s weren’t choppy”
“Hitting rocks”…
A company that previously sank a boat…

This is already beyond strange.

[QUOTE=Knots;172455]

A “Capsize”…
“13 foot seas”…
“The water’s weren’t choppy”
“Hitting rocks”…
A company that previously sank a boat…

This is already beyond strange.[/QUOTE]

What is strange about it?

I doubt anyone came back from the dead after 17 years to cause another wreck.

If a boat gets too close to rocks it might easily hit one and capsize, what is strange about that?

Since that area is open to the North Pacific and there is nothing between Vancouver Island and Japan, very large, long and smooth swells with a glassy surface are quite common. They can make it dangerous near rocks but offshore are don’t pose any great risk in good weather.

Why not wait until the Canadian TSB publishes its report before getting stirred up or looking for another El Faro thread.

[QUOTE=Steamer;172470]What is strange about it?

I doubt anyone came back from the dead after 17 years to cause another wreck.

If a boat gets too close to rocks it might easily hit one and capsize, what is strange about that?

Since that area is open to the North Pacific and there is nothing between Vancouver Island and Japan, very large, long and smooth swells with a glassy surface are quite common. They can make it dangerous near rocks but offshore are don’t pose any great risk in good weather.

Why not wait until the Canadian TSB publishes its report before getting stirred up or looking for another El Faro thread.[/QUOTE]

Why wait when we can just make kneejerk comments?

What’s so strange?

How about all the conflicting reports from a company with a deadly and dubious history…

All I did was post quotes. Not my opinions as you did.

Looking for another El Faro? Are you kidding? What is in the water around here? Are we seeing the attempted birth of another cranky old man? Give me a break. Let the real deal take his shot at me first. That I at least could respect.
6 people out for a nice day on the water are dead man…
Mods please close down this thread as it seems to offend people and get them quite upset. I’ll re-open it in 2 years when the Canadian report is released.

[QUOTE=Knots;172481]

All I did was post quotes. Not my opinions as you did.

Looking for another El Faro? Are you kidding? What is in the water around here? Are we seeing the attempted birth of another cranky old man? Give me a break. Let the real deal take his shot at me first. That I at least could respect.[/QUOTE]

Dipshit … you made a very lame attempt to build drama around an event by going back 17 years and trying to make some kind of connection.

I didn’t post an opinion, I asked a couple of questions and made a statement about the type of seas common in that area where I worked on tugs for a few years.

The mods can’t save your sorry ass now, you have stepped into the quagmire created by your really stupid post.

Now go away and find some other children to play with.

[QUOTE=Knots;172455]…

A “Capsize”…
“13 foot seas”…
“The water’s weren’t choppy”
“Hitting rocks”…
A company that previously sank a boat…

This is already beyond strange.[/QUOTE]

Hold On. I’ve got another membership application for WACT right here …

[QUOTE=Knots;172481]How about all the conflicting reports from a company with a deadly and dubious history…[/QUOTE]

What conflicting reports? The only thing you posted the company said was they were in 10-13 ft and that is their usual operating conditions. There was also a separate claim by an unrelated person saying the waters weren’t choppy (entirely possible for both to be true) and a third GUESS by a head boat skipper that they bottomed out on the rocks in said 10-13 ft swell.

Where’s the conflict?

Steamer,

You win. Your bullying and name calling has really hurt me. I am a dipshit who made a stupid post and I have a sorry ass. You didn’t state any opinions and I will go play with my kids in the backyard quagmire.

You can get back on your meds now. Deep breaths brother.

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;172500]and a third GUESS by a head boat skipper that they bottomed out on the rocks in said 10-13 ft swell.[/QUOTE]

Here is a good example of why you shouldn’t speculate on the record. That fishing vessel skipper’s wild guess was wrong.

http://gcaptain.com/leviathan-ii-sinking-passengers-were-crowded-on-one-side-of-top-deck-when-wave-hit-tsb-says/#.VjEOx3Mo5nE

OK some facts. The first words out of TSB leed were “stability”. Ships registry has shown that the vessel was built as a high speed workboat. Now a bit of speculation, as friend google revealed no photos. Given her specs and the knowledge that she worked in the forest industry she likely worked the Fraser river and adjoining lakes. The style was a open cargo deck aft and an extended wheelhouse forward with seating for less than 12 passengers a threshold for classification. Three points I find worry some are 1 of three rafts deployed. All crew on one side of the top passenger deck. NO ONE SAW THE WAVE. One other item that should be considered is that in Canada we have had 10 years of austerity and reglitory bodies have suffered massive staffing cuts.