Advice, is this a good plan?

Not sure if this is the appropriate sub-board, but I was hoping it would get the most attention.

Here is my current plan, and any/all criticism is appreciated! I know you guys have experience in this field.

I’m an upcoming senior, and love the water. From the fish themselves in aquaria, to sportfishing offshore, everything. I simply love it.

So, in regards to that idea and ploclamation, I am looking to get a masters of Ph.D in Marine Biology.

So, of course by being in Texas, I am considering Texas A&M Galveston (TAMUG) I am looking into the Maritime Academy and Corps of Cadets to get my degree in Biology, and then heading into the Navy to serve the country. I’ll either get my msters at that time online, or when I return after my 6-10 years of duty.

I am a caucasian female, if that matters at all, but am highly considering this pathway. I am in the top 10% of my graduating class of 600 students, and a very dedicated student. I have already completed College level work, and look to add some more my senior year. My friend and I are working on some fitness routines to lose 20lbs or so (I’m not overweight, but I want to get better in shape.)

Any and advice on this plan is highly appreciated! Please let me know! :slight_smile:

What is a ploclamation?

Anyway, If you are looking for job satisfaction, get your Marine Biology degree. High paying jobs in that field are a little tough but hey are not what you would consider rare, just tough to get becuz EVERYBODY wants a Marine Biology degree unless you decide to go into pollution response in which case, join the Coast Guard. There you can network with folks of that same ilk in the industry and set yourself up for when u get out.

Engineering is where the money and being of the female persuasion, will not hurt you there espicially if you looking to go into the office at some point.

Good luck!!!

My apologies, I meant proclamation.

I know a bunch of people that intend to do Marine Biology, but they either top after completing a bachelors in Bio, or they get the bachelors in Marine Biology, which I’m told hinders you based on getting it as a Masters or Doctorate…

So that’s my current plan, and if the outlook isn’t so good, I may stay serving the navy. Either way, the benefits are good, and if I do Maritime Academy and the corps, I will graduate with licenses in marine navigation, and a third mate in the CG.

[QUOTE=aquashelle;51656]My apologies, I meant proclamation.

I know a bunch of people that intend to do Marine Biology, but they either top after completing a bachelors in Bio, or they get the bachelors in Marine Biology, which I’m told hinders you based on getting it as a Masters or Doctorate…

So that’s my current plan, and if the outlook isn’t so good, I may stay serving the navy. Either way, the benefits are good, and if I do Maritime Academy and the corps, I will graduate with licenses in marine navigation, and a third mate in the CG.[/QUOTE]

It’s an excellent plan, I have a twelve year old daughter and would be thrilled if she came to me with that plan. If you love it you will do well. Major in what you are interested in. Money will not be an issue for you. Your third mate ticket will always provide you with food on the table (like six figures your first year out of school if chose not to go in the Navy), or you could as you say stay in the Navy. Your degree, unless it is a professional degree like engineering or nursing is mostly irrelevant. Most employers simply state that a bachelor’s is required, the actual major is usually not an issue. Do what you love, there is a higher likelihood you will stick it out, the money will follow naturally. Don’t rule out King’s Point, USNA, or USCG Academies you sound like an excellent candidate. Best of Luck!

[B]I don’t know who told you that bachelors in Marine Bio would be a “hinderance” vs. masters/doctorate, that sounds like the kind of advice that would come from a person who needs/loves, what I refer to as “initials”. [/B]

[B]I believe in a diversity of skills, sounds like a good plan to get get enlisted, and get some traveling in for few years, you will appreciate it later when you decide to settle into a port where you can apply your degree/s , the Navy has plenty of them worldwide.[/B]

[B]I don’t know what “caucasian female” has to do with it, and I am one. Although I have had my share of static for it though. But that’s not specific for this industry, so don’t waste time with that. [/B]

[B]Congrads on being top of class, I hope that also applies to your respect, in every aspect, : ) of the maritime industry. [I]Did I type that right ?[/I][/B]
[B][/B]
[B]I have worked with the PHd’s that I wish had maritime expierence, It really puts a blow to the start of things when you have to point out that the [I]bow[/I] is the [I]pointy[/I] end of the boat. lol[/B]

[B]On a small scale, i have ran boats and participated in research at the same time. As the jobs get bigger, so does equiptment, employees, technology, etc. So you can’t expect to stand a watch and run winches on the deck at the same time, I’m sure you know.[/B]
[B][/B]
[B]Anyway, your research with different institutions, people, financials, etc. will help you along the way, this is good place to start.[/B]

[B]As far as getting in shape, working engine room, or wax on/off…what ever, that always kept me in shape, and I could go drink beer while everyone else was “working out” lol[/B]

[B]So, good luck, learn how to use this site and search for topics, and for God’s sake don’t get any “advice” or bother trying to get anything from “honesty on job for other gender” stupid thread. There are a lot of people here that are good for encouragement, learning etc. [/B]

[B]best wishes[/B]

[B]bother trying to get anything from “honesty on job for other gender” stupid thread.[/B]

Ohh come on, its good for a laugh!

[QUOTE=NAUTICART;51664][B]I don’t know who told you that bachelors in Marine Bio would be a “hinderance” vs. masters/doctorate, that sounds like the kind of advice that would come from a person who needs/loves, what I refer to as “initials”. [/B][/QUOTE]

I am pretty sure that what was meant by that is that a BS in Marine Biology is less useful than a BS in Biology and that you shouldn’t specialize until the graduate level. (That doesn’t mean less useful in getting a marine bio job but less useful in getting A job.) I don’t know how true that is but I can see it happening. The more specific your degree the less useful it is in the mass job market.

My advice would be that if you are sure you will get the graduate degree then go with a regular Biology undergrad because it gives you a broader educational background but if you will stop at your BS then get it in Marine Bio if you are determined to work in that field and get it in Biology if you want to be sure of getting a job in some kind of biology since marine bio jobs are limited.

[QUOTE=aquashelle;51656]So that’s my current plan, and if the outlook isn’t so good, I may stay serving the navy. Either way, the benefits are good, and if I do Maritime Academy and the corps, I will graduate with licenses in marine navigation, and a third mate in the CG.[/QUOTE]

To clarify [ie. nitpick], you graduate with a license issued by the USCG as a 3rd mate.

I just learned that they have a Marine Bio license program which, if you are willing to put in the extra work, would be a very good choice. If you can’t find Marine Bio work when you graduate you can fall back on your license and make real money. :wink:

[QUOTE=aquashelle;51640]Here is my current plan, and any/all criticism is appreciated!)[/QUOTE]

If only more people your age had such plans! I would suggest leaving flexibility in your plans though (whatever that means for you). Life changes, desires change, etc.

I have a co-worker that obtained his Bachelor’s in Marine Biology without the benefit of a license program. He completed a license program provided by the company and doesn’t use his degree working on tugs, however, he’s happy because he loves what he is doing. Should he ever decide he wants out of the tug industry he has something to fall back on, something many of us don’t have.

Being female does not make you incapable of doing the job and is therefore irrelevant. So don’t make it a point of discussion, let an [U]employer[/U] bring it up if needed.

Thank you everyone who responded! I greatly appreciate all the advice/insite.

I am planning to get my undergraduate in Biology to the point where it is a broader subject where I can study in it, and if I change my mind on my Masters, I can later, but it’s my plan for now. I also like that I can fall back on the licensing.

Thank you everyone!

[QUOTE=aquashelle;51690]I also like that I can fall back on the licensing.[/QUOTE]

LOL! Given the earning ability of degrees these days, you may find that the license is more lucrative than the degree!

You sound like a perfect fit for the NOAA Corps. Your background in Marine Biology and your desire to go to sea as a Commissioned Deck Officer make you a perfect candidate. You would spend 16 weeks at USMMA Kings Point for BOTC learnig navigation and basic ship handling. The classes will satisfy all of the STCW required for a 1600T mates license. After 360 days of sea service (180 as a qualified OOD) you can sit for your license exams. Its hard work, you will have sea projects, collateral duties, watch standing duties and work to do in port. After 2 years or so you will be a commissioned and licensed Deck Officer.

Note that it is now 20 weeks at the US Coast Guard Academy with only the STCW certs for a 100 ton license.

Good god woman, follow your heart. If that is the path you feel you want to follow, enough so that you actually post your thoughts on this site, then you already know that’s the way to go. Go for it, and you will succeed! Good luck.

[QUOTE=“Navigator Jon;91767”]Note that it is now 20 weeks at the US Coast Guard Academy with only the STCW certs for a 100 ton license.[/QUOTE]

What STCW certs are required for a 100 ton license? None…

[QUOTE=Oldsalt206;51703]After 2 years or so you will be a commissioned and licensed Deck Officer.[/QUOTE]

Commissioned, not licensed (unless something has changed) similar to the Navy.

[QUOTE=Azimuth;91841]Commissioned, not licensed (unless something has changed) similar to the Navy.[/QUOTE]

Up until recently NOAA corps officers had a commission and all of the required training to get a license.

I find this hard to believe seeing how both the Navy’s and CG’s training is not “approved” by the NMC for licensing, so why would NOAA’s be? And im not sure how 20 weeks at the CGA is equal to 4 years at a REAL maritime academy as far as earning a license.

[QUOTE=“commtuna;91903”]

I find this hard to believe seeing how both the Navy’s and CG’s training is not “approved” by the NMC for licensing, so why would NOAA’s be? And im not sure how 20 weeks at the CGA is equal to 4 years at a REAL maritime academy as far as earning a license.[/QUOTE]

They got certified for a 1600 ton license through GMATS at Kings Point, which is now closed (why they moved their training to the USCG academy), thus they don’t get a license anymore.

There are various commissioning programs for Navy, Coast Guard, and NOAA Corps at the maritime academies. Take your pick of school and branch of service, graduate with your Third Mate ticket and serve in whatever capacity you want to pursue. SSO for Navy, MARGRAD for CG, and BOTC for NOAA are all currently available. Any of these combo’s would allow you to pursue a degree in Biology, a license to sail commercial vessels, and a commission in one of the services. Some of the commissioning programs are completed during your time at the academy, while others are completed after you graduate. Good luck