2182...monitored or not?

You wouldn’t think so to hear them tell it, unless their advertising has changed in the last twenty years.

Side note: The US Navy used to have an installation (maybe still does) with IIRC a sixty foot diameter turntable covered with lead sheeting to approximate the electrical characteristics of salt water. They used it with little model ships to optimize the near-field characteristics of having bunches of antennas on board.

Marketing is the key dear Watson…:wink: Ashore an effective RF earth or ground system can be created by burying radials. The more radials buried, generally the better. One approach is to bury between 50 and 100 wires of length up to 3λ/2. A general rule of thumb that is often used is that the more radials the better, and it is better to have more short radials than a few long ones.

With a quarter wave length antenna the aerial current is maximum at the earth connection. The power loss caused by a poor antenna RF ground connection is of particular importance as a poor ground results in real power losses. Due to the small size of the Dynaplate the losses will be substantial.

A painted steel ship’s hull presents no earthing problem as the iron hull and sea water with the paint as dielectric forms a large capacitor which lets the RF energy pass with minimal losses.

Just an update. I emailed the USCG and thus far have received this reply:

Good day,

This request is documented in CGFIXIT as Incident Number INC000003041455.

It has been directed to the Technical Team for further review.

If you have any further questions or concerns please call 1-855-CGFIXIT (1-855-243-4948) choosing option 3 for OSC Application Support.