This is Singapore


#1

Singapore makes plans for the long haul. If Singapore Port is to stay ahead of regional competition it has to stay ahead in technology, planning, facilities and service: http://www.straitstimes.com/business/economy/long-term-vision-vital-for-maritime-singapore

How can this be achieved?
By having good governance, low corruption, honest and well paid bureaucrats and politicians.

Can it be copied elsewhere?
Yes, but not if everything is politicized and the only thing that matter to politicians is to get re-elected.


#2

[QUOTE=ombugge;190341]Singapore makes plans for the long haul. If Singapore Port is to stay ahead of regional competition it has to stay ahead in technology, planning, facilities and service: http://www.straitstimes.com/business/economy/long-term-vision-vital-for-maritime-singapore

How can this be achieved?
By having good governance, low corruption, honest and well paid bureaucrats and politicians.

Can it be copied elsewhere?
Yes, but not if everything is politicized and the only thing that matter to politicians is to get re-elected.[/QUOTE]

Last years Transparency International Corruption Perception Index has just been published and Singapore is still the ONLY Asian country among the top 10: https://www.transparency.org/news/feature/corruption_perceptions_index_2016

But Singapore has fallen a few places since it’s best position as #5 in 2012, when it was only 3 point behind the three first place winners: http://www.transparency.org/cpi2012/results


#3

The Coonasses obviously spread their wings, flying away from the Bayous these days.
This from Vivo City Shopping Mall at Keppel Bay, Singapore:


You may use your imagination as to what a dancing Crab (or Coonass) look like in the wee hours of the morning.


#4

I remember this place in Ciudad del Carmen, Mexico. Actually, no Louisiana style seafood. Was told by one of the locals that “kahoon” as he pronounced it had nothing to do with Louisiana. . . . I figured it was named “Cajun” to attract the displaced oilfield folks. . .


#5

[QUOTE=cmakin;196010]I remember this place in Ciudad del Carmen, Mexico. Actually, no Louisiana style seafood. Was told by one of the locals that “kahoon” as he pronounced it had nothing to do with Louisiana. . . . I figured it was named “Cajun” to attract the displaced oilfield folks. . .

My last job in Cartagena Colombia was '78 or '79. The office secretary and her boyfriend (I think he was Texmex) opened a taco stand. They made a killing.


#6

[QUOTE=ombugge;195992]The Coonasses obviously spread their wings, flying away from the Bayous these days.
This from Vivo City Shopping Mall at Keppel Bay, Singapore:


You may use your imagination as to what a dancing Crab (or Coonass) look like in the wee hours of the morning.[/QUOTE]
//youtu.be/0QaAKi0NFkA


#7

Have never been cheated more in my life at sea than taking bunkers in Singapore…


#8

You obviously haven’t been around much.
Try going to any port in the US and you will find a lot more cheating.
Singapore is the ONLY major bunkering port in the world that has implemented Mass flow meter measurement as a MUST for ANY bunker delivery.

OOOPs!!! I may have pointed out the obvious here, but you are welcome to “fact check” my statement.


#9

I never had any problems in Singapore but we spent a few months anchored across the strait in Batam and the place was, litterally, swimming with theives.


#10

I admit not having taken bunkers there in almost ten years. Should have changed to the better.
But flowmeters were never an option on 8000-11000 TEU container vessels with intake capacities
of 800 cbm/h ( appr. 210000 gallons/h ). And even then we had difficulties to fill our fuel
sample containers due to insufficient pressure on the vessels bunker station sampling point.
No offense, I am retired since 2012. I am new to this Forum and hope to contribute some
knowledge before it goes down the drain.
Anyhow, Singapore bunkers were the worst I had encountered in 46 years at sea.


#11

We were always bunkering at anchorage, never in port. Of course we received papers
from Singapore bunker authorities giving us any right to claim. But the barges
always came late and ETD was pressing. We had not enough crew to manually
sound the tanks, so remote sounding was normal. The barge was filling up our system
with compressed air thus faking the real results. Only after leaving anchorage we
suddenly encountered differences up to 80 mt . A good chief always has reserves
but I hated those barge captains who knew our deficiencies in time and manpower.


#12

Welcome @oildrop I look forward to reading your informative and experienced posts in the future. Thanks for joining.


#13

I’ll give my utmost…
Thanks


#14

you’ll be happy to know Singapore puts at least one bunker’r in prison every year and bans a few more for life.


#15

Singapore is the largest bunkering port in the world and is trying to ensure that the business is conducted according to stringent rules to maintain it’s reputation as a clean place in more ways then one.

Because of problems with cheating in the bunkering business in Singapore in the past, the rules governing the business has been strengthened several times in the last 10 years or so. First by requiring Bunker Surveyors to be given special training and being licensed by MPA. At the same time the punishment for cheating by suppliers and/or surveyors was strengthened and several operators banned from working within Singapore Port Limit: http://www.mpa.gov.sg/web/portal/home/port-of-singapore/port-operations/bunkering/bunkering-standards/singapore-standard-code-of-practice-for-bunkering-ss600

As the first bunkering port in the world, it is compulsory for all MFO bunkering operations to be done using a certified and calibrated Mass Flow Meter from 1. Jan. 2017: http://www.mpa.gov.sg/web/portal/home/port-of-singapore/circulars-and-notices/detail/pc14-08

Mass Flow Meters approved by MPA is supposed to be tamper free. They must be operated according to strict practisesc set by MPA: http://www.mpa.gov.sg/web/portal/home/port-of-singapore/port-operations/bunkering/bunkering-101-placards/mass-flow-metering-best-practices

The type of MFM used in Singapore is superior to those in use in the EU: http://www.mpa.gov.sg/web/portal/home/port-of-singapore/port-operations/bunkering/bunkering-101-placards/mass-flow-metering-best-practices

Old practises, like “frotting” as described above is no longer possible, but rest assure some enterprising bunker suppliers will try to find way of cheating, AND GET CAUGHT.


#16

Thanks a lot for this comprehensive information


#17

Is this a good idea or too much of a “nanny state”??: http://www.todayonline.com/singapore...ight-crossings
The problem of people being more occupied by their mobile phones than their own safety is nothing special for Singapore. It irritates me no end.


#18

Welcome to a Michelin Star adorned Hawker Stall in Singapore: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/singapore-s-hill-street-tai-wah-bak-chor-mee-tops-global-street-8923920
It is not the only one, believe it or not.


#20

An old and well loved “institution”, the “Thief’s Market” in Singapore is coming to an end: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/sungei-road-thieves-market-the-final-weeks-9016892
Nowadays most of the goods are actually collected by “Karung Guni men” (Rag’n’Bone men) or purchased at jumble sales.

Here is a picture of Thief’s Market in my young and tender days, when there were still shop houses along the narrow streets:


I have walked these street many time over the years. It didn’t change much before sometime in the mid-1990’s, when the houses were demolished, but the vendors kept on trading anyhow.


#21

Crime wave in Singapore!!!
Two armed robberies in a matter of two consecutive days are just about unheard of in “crime free” Singapore.
The first at a petrol station: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...harged-9084174
Second in a Western Union office: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/armed-robbery-at-western-union-branch-in-ubi-suspect-at-large-9081564
Even more unusual is that the second robber was not caught within hours.