Fidel Castro is dead


#1

As everybody must have noticed, Fidel Castro had died at age 90, a respectable age for a man that has been exposed to 100 assassination attempts.
World leaders have sent their condolences and expressed their admiration for a man that has lead his country through some difficult times and against all odds: http://www.todayonline.com/world/leaders-pay-tribute-fidel-castro-critics-scathing-tyrant?cid=todayInsideTodaypage

There are two persons quoted who obviously do not know diplomacy yet, or haven’t learnt normal courtesy and manners.


#2

Sometimes I wonder where your behavior could come from. Certainly not from the Norwegians, they did not hail their own Nazi-collaborators, neither from the “liberal and free” State of Singapore. Was it the equatorial sun there?

I am not a diplomat, nor are you, nor are probably all of this forum’s members.
Diplomats represent the government of their state, nothing more and nothing less. States do not have compassion and sympathy; they only have interests. Sometimes it may be interests for the future of their country; sometimes they may only cover up their own former or present behavior.

I am a European too, but never ever, I would discuss the election of their president or their government with people from the other 30 European states. I may have my preferences, but this is strictly their affair; only they live there.

Knowing the state of their country, why does the Castro family (or other dictators) not abdicate? At the best, they would immediately be jailed!
Why should we “express our admiration for a man that has lead his country through some difficult times”, if this inhuman dictator was the only origin of all these difficulties?

Did you see the Cuban-Americans at Miami celebrate Fidel’s death?


#3

Burn in hell, Fidel.


#4

[QUOTE=ombugge;192805]As everybody must have noticed, Fidel Castro had died at age 90, a respectable age for a man that has been exposed to 100 assassination attempts.
World leaders have sent their condolences and expressed their admiration for a man that has lead his country through some difficult times and against all odds.[/QUOTE]

Any official who sends condolences for the death of a despotic tyrant needs to have their motives in government seriously questioned.

He killed 100’s, essentially imprisoned his citizens in their own country, and made it so miserable that many chose to flee in pathetic attempts to cross the Atlantic with great personal risk.

The man deserves no praise and his death deserves only celebration.

Yes sir, Bayrunner, let him rot in hell for sure.


#5

I have to say, the Venezuelan President speaking of “keep(ing) on winning…”, is rather ironic.


#6

CIA has tried to kill Fidel Castro many times, yet he died of old age at 90. Maybe the God he didn’t believe in held his hand over him?

During the years since the revolution that overthrew the US backed and Mafi controlled dictator that had robbed the Cubans blind for years, every effort has been made to stop Cuba from developing, yet they have managed to build up a world class health and education system.

Could this have been done without the majority of Cubans backing up their leader, or allowing foreign inspired and funded 5th columnist and saboteurs to fight against development? Not likely.

Some of the sacrifices that they had to suffer was the freedom to speak up and criticise their leaders, low standard of living by western measures and the constant threat of a US invasion and intervention in Cuban affairs. Nobody say that Fidel Castro was a Saint, or didn’t do bad mistakes, but that is no reason to celebrate his death.

In the years after the 1959 revolution in Cuba until at least the 1990’s the US backed Dictators in several South and Central American countries that did worse atrocities than Fidel Castro, but that is OK?

As to how Norway treated their Nazi collaborators after the second world war compared with Castro’s treatment of Cuban collaborators with America I have not enough knowledge to comment, except that they were probably seen as the same. Those who collaborate with the enemy is a traitor.

I have never been to Cuba, but I do appreciate the protection they afforded us when working in Angola during the 1980’s.


#7

Norway really is in its own alternate reality somehow existing side by side or within the real world timeline. Is there a fella named Harrison Wells running a place called Star Labs somewhere in Norway?

Things were so great in Cuba these people risked life and limb to escape.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/party-miami-news-fidel-castros-death-spreads-140239151.html

It was a workers paradise…

http://reason.com/blog/2016/11/26/five-worst-responses-fidel-castro-death/

He suffered right along side the proletariat because he was no better than any of them. A man of the people…


#8

Sorry, I have no idea about one Harrison Wells, or Star Labs, but you are probably talking about something from the alternate reality that is Hollywood, American TV, or Cartoons. (I have noticed that that is a common thing among Americans)

Things were so great in Cuba these people risked life and limb to escape.

No things were not so great in Cuba, mainly due to an embargo that caused hardship for the common man. With an open invitation to risk life and limb to reach American shores, of course a lot of people took the change. Others stayed and tried to build their country with whatever means available. Who were the heros and who were the quitters is up to your perception.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/party-miami-news-fidel-castros-death-spreads-140239151.html
The ones that celebrated was among the latter.

It was a workers paradise…
http://reason.com/blog/2016/11/26/five-worst-responses-fidel-castro-death/

Your choise of sources are impeccable and in line with the best of America’s thrustworthy news channel, such as Fox News etc. Foreign leaders are idiots and do not have the guts to lie like a real trooper.
True believers in “free minds and free markets”, as long as they agree with your viewpoint. Foreign markets must be free for American business, not necessarily the other way around. (Free market on our terms)

He suffered right along side the proletariat because he was no better than any of them. A man of the people…
http://nypost.com/2016/11/27/inside-fidel-castros-life-of-luxury-and-ladies-while-country-starved/

Just like a coming President and protector of the down throdden working class in USA.
Yeah, long live Unions and 'MURICA.

A leader of a country that never accepted foreign intervention, or bowed down to aggression has died. May he rest in peace. The world is honouring him, only those who couldn’t kill or oppress him, not for lack of trying for over 50 years, is not.


#9


#10

Hopefully Black Friday wasn’t the cause.


#11

[QUOTE=ombugge;192827]I have never been to Cuba, but I do appreciate the protection they afforded us when working in Angola during the 1980’s.[/QUOTE]
I remember my first excursian to Cabinda and Zaire 1980(?). I was concerned about my safety. An old Portuguese seaman told me “this is the safest place in West Africa. Both sides want cabinda intact. And besides, Gulf Oil has the best mercenaries.” I never saw any Cubans in Soyo but I’m sure they were there. The local army was the most ruthless murdering SOBs I’ve seen to their own people.

My next trip there I was in Luanda 1981. Plenty of Ruskies, Cubans and Yugos. We went in to tow the Sedco 250 up north. As the Jap tug and barge submerged the barge to float off the 250, the barge sunk and blocked the main channel. There was about 30 Ruskie war ships and half the Yugo fishing fleet blocked in. You would have thought it was WW3.

After the melee, we towed the 250 off Cabinda and it sunk into a blowout shortly after spudding in. Fun times in the West Africa Copa Cabana!


#12

“No things were not so great in Cuba, mainly due to an embargo that caused hardship for the common man. With an open invitation to risk life and limb to reach American shores, of course a lot of people took the change. Others stayed and tried to build their country with whatever means available. Who were the heros and who were the quitters is up to your perception.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/party-mia...140239151.html
The ones that celebrated was among the latter.”

I could not open the article but from the headline I assume that it is discussing the Cubans in Miami (those that left Cuba to seek what they considered a better life) celebrating his death? So you are actually saying that people that risked their lives to cross open ocean and come to a new land with almost nothing, just for the chance at freedom, are [I]quitters?[/I]

That’s downright indecent. Celebrating the death of a murderous dictator is “impolite” but calling those that risked their lives to better their family’s situations quitters is fine. Seems like a double standard.


#13
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[QUOTE=farmerfalconer;192846]“No things were not so great in Cuba, mainly due to an embargo that caused hardship for the common man. With an open invitation to risk life and limb to reach American shores, of course a lot of people took the change. Others stayed and tried to build their country with whatever means available. Who were the heros and who were the quitters is up to your perception.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/party-mia...140239151.html
The ones that celebrated was among the latter.”

I could not open the article but from the headline I assume that it is discussing the Cubans in Miami (those that left Cuba to seek what they considered a better life) celebrating his death? So you are actually saying that people that risked their lives to cross open ocean and come to a new land with almost nothing, just for the chance at freedom, are [I]quitters?[/I]

That’s downright indecent. Celebrating the death of a murderous dictator is “impolite” but calling those that risked their lives to better their family’s situations quitters is fine. Seems like a double standard.[/QUOTE]
one country in the world doesnt trade with you and cuba goes tits up?
must have zero friends?


#14

[QUOTE=farmerfalconer;192846]“No things were not so great in Cuba, mainly due to an embargo that caused hardship for the common man. With an open invitation to risk life and limb to reach American shores, of course a lot of people took the change. Others stayed and tried to build their country with whatever means available. Who were the heros and who were the quitters is up to your perception.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/party-mia...140239151.html
The ones that celebrated was among the latter.”

I could not open the article but from the headline I assume that it is discussing the Cubans in Miami (those that left Cuba to seek what they considered a better life) celebrating his death? So you are actually saying that people that risked their lives to cross open ocean and come to a new land with almost nothing, just for the chance at freedom, are [I]quitters?[/I]

That’s downright indecent. Celebrating the death of a murderous dictator is “impolite” but calling those that risked their lives to better their family’s situations quitters is fine. Seems like a double standard.[/QUOTE]

There are thousands of Migrants crossing the seas right now in search of a better life. (I.e. Economic Migrants)
The Cubans who did the same were also economic migrants, not refugees running away from war or oppression.

At present there are abt 65 mill. people displaced because of war and insurgencies. (I.e. Refugees)
Women and children are languishing in camps around the world, but the rich world cannot find in their heart to accommodate them. In stead Europe is spending millions to stop anybody from getting to their territory to seek asylum protection and America wants to build walls to keep others out.

You want to discus double standard?
America has a policy to allow any Cuban who reach American shore to settle, yet you send Haitians and others who do so back.
Are Cubans more deprived than Haitians? No, it is misplaced resentment against the Cuban Government and the majority of the Cuban people for not bowing down to America’s might.

Isn’t it an eye opener that only American press and a section of the American political elite is “celebrating” the death of Fidel Castro, while the rest of the world shows respect for the man?


#15

[QUOTE=injunear;192844]I remember my first excursian to Cabinda and Zaire 1980(?). I was concerned about my safety. An old Portuguese seaman told me “this is the safest place in West Africa. Both sides want cabinda intact. And besides, Gulf Oil has the best mercenaries.” I never saw any Cubans in Soyo but I’m sure they were there. The local army was the most ruthless murdering SOBs I’ve seen to their own people.

My next trip there I was in Luanda 1981. Plenty of Ruskies, Cubans and Yugos. We went in to tow the Sedco 250 up north. As the Jap tug and barge submerged the barge to float off the 250, the barge sunk and blocked the main channel. There was about 30 Ruskie war ships and half the Yugo fishing fleet blocked in. You would have thought it was WW3.

After the melee, we towed the 250 off Cabinda and it sunk into a blowout shortly after spudding in. Fun times in the West Africa Copa Cabana![/QUOTE]

The Cubans protected the airport in Cabinda City and Gulf Oil’s base at Molongo against attack by the American backed rebels. I don’t know if you noticed, but Soyo Base and the Esso installation just south of there also had some Cubans guarding them.


#16

[QUOTE=ombugge;192857]The Cubans protected the airport in Cabinda City and Gulf Oil’s base at Molongo against attack by the American backed rebels. I don’t know if you noticed, but Soyo Base and the Esso installation just south of there also had some Cubans guarding them.[/QUOTE]

The 2 times I flew into the area was from Kinsasha to Banana. Then bounced around the fleet making repairs after the crews sold the spares. Fun times.


#17

[QUOTE=injunear;192859]The 2 times I flew into the area was from Kinsasha to Banana. Then bounced around the fleet making repairs after the crews sold the spares. Fun times.[/QUOTE]

Sometimes the rebels lobbed a rocked or two into the bases, just to remind them to pay protection money.


#18

Cuba had a opportunity to be as successful as any of the better off Caribbean islands including the Bahamas…their government must of not wanted to make that… sacrifice!


#19

Прошу прощения, товарищ Кастро сильно не понял так же, как его сверстники …

Kim Jong Il

Vladimir Lenin

Leonid Brezhnev

Chiang Kai Shek

Kim Il Sung

Ho Chi Minh

Pol Pot

Josef Stalin

Mao Zedong

Я уверен, что все их граждане любили их так много для всех великих школ и здравоохранения они были готовы пропустить небольшой геноцид здесь и там


#20

[QUOTE=ombugge;192856]Isn’t it an eye opener that only American press and a section of the American political elite is “celebrating” the death of Fidel Castro, while the rest of the world shows respect for the man?[/QUOTE]
Isn’t it ironic that Putin won’t attend the funeral of the USSRs foremost tool. I guess he was the ultimate “useful idiot”…