The Sea is My Brother, trailer

I just watched the ‘’ The Sea Is My Brother’’ trailer. I can’t understand why the merchant mariners of WWll were never given the respect they so deserved. I have a good friend who is a retired army major, we have had many discussions about this subject and he believes that the merchant mariners do not deserve the benefits that military veterans received. I have tried to point out that they were shot at, torpedoed, attacked by kamikazes,had ships sunk from under them and were captured and held as pow’s. His answer is that they were free to leave at any time and were not drafted. It sounds like our elected officials feel the same way. I hope that H.R. 1936 passes before they are all gone.

You have a link for the trailer? All I can find on google is links to the book. :confused:

----- update----

Never mind, I found it.

[QUOTE=Dawn patrol;163821]I just watched the ‘’ The Sea Is My Brother’’ trailer. I can’t understand why the merchant mariners of WWll were never given the respect they so deserved. I have a good friend who is a retired army major, we have had many discussions about this subject and he believes that the merchant mariners do not deserve the benefits that military veterans received. I have tried to point out that they were shot at, torpedoed, attacked by kamikazes,had ships sunk from under them and were captured and held as pow’s. His answer is that they were free to leave at any time and were not drafted. It sounds like our elected officials feel the same way. I hope that H.R. 1936 passes before they are all gone.[/QUOTE]

Mariners were sometimes portrayed as unpatriotic, lazy with communist leanings. Most of it was anti-union propaganda. One example is the untrue story that was circulated alleging that mariners refused to unload much needed supplies for marines at Guadalcanal. Here is an article about it (pdf)

My Late Father-In-Law was in the Navy and was assigned to a Liberty Ship as a Gunner. I had the Pleasure of spending many hours talking to him about his adventures. He had nothing but respect for all of the Merchant Mariners that he sailed with and the ships they sailed on. He was also very interested to here about what the Modern Merchant Marine had become.

John passed about 3 years after I started seeing / married my now Wife and I will always treasure the time that I got to spend with him. Everyone always says that he liked me so much because he finally had someone that he could talk to about his time at sea.

[QUOTE=Kennebec Captain;163825]Mariners were sometimes portrayed as unpatriotic, lazy with communist leanings. Most of it was anti-union propaganda. One example is the untrue story that was circulated alleging that mariners refused to unload much needed supplies for marines at Guadalcanal. Here is an article about it (pdf)[/QUOTE]

In 2007 I had the rare privilege to accompany my Dad to the battleship PENNSYLVANIA reunion in Portland Or. My Dad introduced me to a group of his division as a merchant mariner on the verge of retirement. They all cast a jaundiced eye.

I was told the ill feelings came from an incident in Cold Bay Alaska just before the battle of Attu. It seems an ammo ship was to transfer munitions at anchor. The crew refused to transfer cargo due to an OT dispute. The battleship crew finished the ops. As everything was being secured, the Japs attacked. Most of the crew of the cargo ship all piled on the PENNSYLVANIA. Luckily, no one was killed.

[QUOTE=injunear;163836]In 2007 I had the rare privilege to accompany my Dad to the battleship PENNSYLVANIA reunion in Portland Or. My Dad introduced me to a group of his division as a merchant mariner on the verge of retirement. They all cast a jaundiced eye.

I was told the ill feelings came from an incident in Cold Bay Alaska just before the battle of Attu. It seems an ammo ship was to transfer munitions at anchor. The crew refused to transfer cargo due to an OT dispute. The battleship crew finished the ops. As everything was being secured, the Japs attacked. Most of the crew of the cargo ship all piled on the PENNSYLVANIA. Luckily, no one was killed.[/QUOTE]

The furthest east of any Japanese attack in Alaska is the bombing of Dutch Harbor in 1942. The Pennsylvania was in Cold Bay in 1943 but there was never a Japanese attack there.

[QUOTE=Dawn patrol;163821]His answer is that they were free to leave at any time and were not drafted.[/QUOTE]

Yes but they didn’t! Doesn’t that make them more deserving and brave!?

[QUOTE=Kennebec Captain;163843]The furthest east of any Japanese attack in Alaska is the bombing of Dutch Harbor in 1942. The Pennsylvania was in Cold Bay in 1943 but there was never a Japanese attack there.[/QUOTE]
I’m probably mistaken about Cold Bay but I will break out the PENNSYLVANIA battle history when I get back home.

I read a very interesting book on the Battle of the Atlantic recently that went into great detail the relationship between Navy and merchant sailors during the war. Their likes and dislikes towards each other, their struggles and triumphs together, and the men who both helped and hindered the tenuous relationship between the two parties. I was always curious how the two felt about each other and this book delved deeply into that. I’ll find it and post the name and author here later in case anyone is interested. I know I was.

The stroy of the Marines at Guadalcanal is well known. Aside from pitched battles with the Japanese for control of Henderson field many marines were ill with dysentery and other tropical diseases. The Marines were desperately short on supplies including cigarettes.

The untrue story was the crews of the ship’s refused to work on Sundays, depriving the Marines of much needed supplies. The story spread to the U.S. and was published in some newspapers.

The Guadalcanal story attracted vehement words against unions from conservative bastions like the Chicago Daily Tribune and the Los Angeles Times. The Chicago Daily Tribune published several articles condemning the NMU and praising the efforts of Congressman Hoffman, who called the whole affair “a story of treasonable activities unsurpassed in the history of the world.”11 The Los Angeles Times ran an editorial in the January 23rd, 1943 edition titled “How Long Should Traitors Last?” This article proclaimed that the actions of the unions, particularly CIO unions, amounted to treason. The Times argued that the government needed to step in and impose military style discipline, instead of words, in dealing with these traitors. It also accused the union leaders of lacking control over their members, as evidenced by the apparent multitude of small-scale strikes they claimed interfered with war production and the troops in the field. The overriding fear among the anti-unionists and the anti-Communists was the tremendous power wielded by labor unions under the Roosevelt administration. Nowhere was this power embodied more than in the special privileges granted to maritime unions by the War Shipping Administration.12

The was a Congressional investigation and the story fell apart. Not a single witness could be found to verify the story. All the reports were second or third hand. One of the marines that had reported the story later confessed that he was unaware that the ships were unloaded using local labor not ship’s crew. It was also pointed out the ship crew routinely work on Sundays. The NMU filed and won an out of court settlement.

Besides anti-union propaganda mariners were portrayed as drunks and having poor morals (??), mariner wages in the war were not high but they made more then there military counterparts and this was a source of discontent as well.

The bravery and sacrifice of merchant seaman in the war is now well known to many, however the some in the military still harbor resentments even today.

[QUOTE=Kennebec Captain;163843]The furthest east of any Japanese attack in Alaska is the bombing of Dutch Harbor in 1942. The Pennsylvania was in Cold Bay in 1943 but there was never a Japanese attack there.[/QUOTE]

Didn’t take long for my sister to get it clarified from the Pennsy group. At the end of cargo ops, an unidentified plane was spotted on radar and they were called to general quarters. Turned out to be one of ours.

[QUOTE=Slick Cam;163860]I read a very interesting book on the Battle of the Atlantic recently that went into great detail the relationship between Navy and merchant sailors during the war. Their likes and dislikes towards each other, their struggles and triumphs together, and the men who both helped and hindered the tenuous relationship between the two parties. I was always curious how the two felt about each other and this book delved deeply into that. I’ll find it and post the name and author here later in case anyone is interested. I know I was.[/QUOTE]

Sounds like it might be an interesting read. The distrust sometimes worked both ways, just human nature. I had an old timer AB years ago that sailed merchant during the Battle of the Atlantic. He was still mad about convoy PQ-17.

my thoughts exactly…[QUOTE=john;163846]Yes but they didn’t! Doesn’t that make them more deserving and brave!?[/QUOTE]