Ss united states is being prepared for a new life

SS UNITED STATES IS BEING PREPARED FOR A NEW LIFE[FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]By GEOFF MULVIHILL
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
— Nov. 28, 2013 1:22 PM EST[/FONT]
You are hereHome » United States » SS United States is being prepared for a new life
[FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]RELATED
[ul]
[li]Palace: Prince William ends military career[/li][li]Nevada petroglyphs the oldest in North America[/li][/ul]

[/FONT]
SHARE[FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][/FONT]
[/FONT]

[FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][COLOR=#04558B !important][FONT=Arial][B]0[/B][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]in[FONT=inherit][B]Share[/B][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=inherit]
[/FONT]

Tumblr
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]
[ul]
[li][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][/li][/FONT]
[I][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]This Nov. 22, 2013 photo shows the SS United States in Philadelphia. Workers began a project in October to transform it into a massive dockside attraction. The SS United States Conservancy, the nonprofit group that owns the ship, warns that if its grand plans do not come together quickly, there might be no choice but to sell the historic liner as scrap. The ship was launched in 1952 as the world’s fastest ocean liner, and it still holds the record for speediest trans-Atlantic voyage. It was partially funded by the Navy with the idea that it could be converted one day into an extremely efficient troop transporter. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/I][/FONT]

[li][FONT=inherit][/li][/FONT]
[I][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]This Nov. 22, 2013 photo shows the bow of the SS United States in Philadelphia. Workers began a project in October to transform it into a massive dockside attraction. The SS United States Conservancy, the nonprofit group that owns the ship, warns that if its grand plans do not come together quickly, there might be no choice but to sell the historic liner as scrap. The ship was launched in 1952 as the world’s fastest ocean liner, and it still holds the record for speediest trans-Atlantic voyage. It was partially funded by the Navy with the idea that it could be converted one day into an extremely efficient troop transporter. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/I][/FONT]

[li][FONT=inherit][/li][/FONT]
[I][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]This Nov. 22, 2013 photo shows the hull of the SS United States in Philadelphia. Workers began a project in October to transform it into a massive dockside attraction. The SS United States Conservancy, the nonprofit group that owns the ship, warns that if its grand plans do not come together quickly, there might be no choice but to sell the historic liner as scrap. The ship was launched in 1952 as the world’s fastest ocean liner, and it still holds the record for speediest trans-Atlantic voyage. It was partially funded by the Navy with the idea that it could be converted one day into an extremely efficient troop transporter. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/I][/FONT]

[li][FONT=inherit][/li][/FONT]
[I][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]This Nov. 22, 2013 photo shows the first class cabin area of the SS United States in Philadelphia. Workers began a project in October to transform it into a massive dockside attraction. The SS United States Conservancy, the nonprofit group that owns the ship, warns that if its grand plans do not come together quickly, there might be no choice but to sell the historic liner as scrap. The ship was launched in 1952 as the world’s fastest ocean liner, and it still holds the record for speediest trans-Atlantic voyage. It was partially funded by the Navy with the idea that it could be converted one day into an extremely efficient troop transporter. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/I][/FONT]

[li][FONT=inherit][/li][/FONT]
[I][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]This Nov. 22, 2013 photo shows the engine room of the ship SS United States in Philadelphia. Workers began a project in October to transform it into a massive dockside attraction. The SS United States Conservancy, the nonprofit group that owns the ship, warns that if its grand plans do not come together quickly, there might be no choice but to sell the historic liner as scrap. The ship was launched in 1952 as the world’s fastest ocean liner, and it still holds the record for speediest trans-Atlantic voyage. It was partially funded by the Navy with the idea that it could be converted one day into an extremely efficient troop transporter. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/I][/FONT]

[li][FONT=inherit][/li][/FONT]
[I][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]This Nov. 22, 2013 photo shows the promenade deck of the SS United States in Philadelphia. Workers began a project in October to transform it into a massive dockside attraction. The SS United States Conservancy, the nonprofit group that owns the ship, warns that if its grand plans do not come together quickly, there might be no choice but to sell the historic liner as scrap. The ship was launched in 1952 as the world’s fastest ocean liner, and it still holds the record for speediest trans-Atlantic voyage. It was partially funded by the Navy with the idea that it could be converted one day into an extremely efficient troop transporter. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/I][/FONT]
[/ul]
[/FONT]

[ul]
[li]Prev [/li][li]1 of 6 [/li][li]Next[/li][/ul]

[/FONT]
[FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit][FONT=inherit]
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Its future is still uncertain, but the SS United States is getting a below-the-deck makeover to make it more appealing for developers interested in turning what was once the world’s fastest ocean liner into a massive dockside attraction.
Workers began a project in October to remove tanks and other materials from the belly of the ship to make way for modern utilities systems that would need to go in to transform it. There’s a second objective to the project, which is expected to last well into 2014: selling the materials to raise the $50,000 to $60,000 it takes each month to maintain and insure the vessel.
The SS United States Conservancy, the nonprofit group that owns the ship, warns that if its grand plans do not come together quickly, there might be no choice but to sell the historic liner as scrap.
“It’s a great fixer-upper,” said Susan Gibbs, executive director of the SS United States Conservancy and the granddaughter of William Francis Gibbs, the ship’s Philadelphia-born designer, on a tour of the ship.
How to use the ship — as long as three football fields and a monument to shimmery aluminum and the sleek lines of mid-20th-century Modernism — has been a conundrum for more than 40 years.
The SS United States was launched in 1952 as the world’s fastest ocean liner, and it still holds the record for speediest trans-Atlantic voyage. The ship was partially funded by the Navy with the idea that it could be converted one day into an extremely efficient troop transporter.
But it was never called to service by the government. And by 1969, after carrying four presidents, Prince Rainier of Monaco, Elizabeth Taylor and a million other people across the Atlantic, it was retired from its regular duties.
The hulking ship has been berthed on the Delaware River in Philadelphia since 1996, its once-bold red, white and blue paint faded and its iron oxidizing in a pier across the street from a shopping center.
Over the years, plans to make the SS United States into a cruise ship have failed, partly because it was designed for speed, not slow-moving recreation, and is narrower than modern cruise ships.
The conservancy used a $5.8 million gift from a Philadelphia philanthropist in 2010 to buy the ship. The group’s vision is different from others that came before. It wants to turn it into a multiuse attraction, perhaps with restaurants, a hotel and banquet facilities, along with a maritime history museum.
Some retired naval ships — including the USS New Jersey in nearby Camden and the USS Intrepid in New York — have been turned into museums. But the high overhead costs of keeping a boat floating, even if it’s stationary, can bring financial difficulties. Despite fundraising efforts, the SS United States owners would have a difficult time paying basic bills without selling some scrap.
There is at least one model for the sort of development the SS United States owners have in mind. The SS Rotterdam opened three years ago with a hotel, museum and school in its namesake city in the Netherlands.
Thomas Basile, a consultant with the conservancy, believes it would be feasible in New York City or Philadelphia.
Aboard the ship, Basile said it’s in better shape than it appears, and a level in the navigation bridge shows that it’s not hewing either way. “It’s benefited from being over-engineered,” he said.


Follow Mulvihill at http://www.twitter.com/geoffmulvihill
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[FONT=inherit]SHARE
[/FONT]
[/FONT]
[/FONT][/COLOR]

Well I must say that is a novel approach to scrap the ship from within until it will be nothing but an empty hollow shell…not saying that it isn’t an empty shell already there certainly must be a lot of machinery in her that is likely built of some very valuable materials. Bronze, brass, stainless, copper and so forth.

I didn’t notice any mention of the Queen Mary in Long Beach. I was just there a few weeks ago and while I didn’t tour her I did swing by for photos. I don’t know how profitable an attraction she is, but I am sure she’s not cheap to operate and maintain.

People can get very delusional about these things and let sentiment override common sense, which is part of the reason she has spent decades rotting away in Philly.

[QUOTE=catherder;125354]I didn’t notice any mention of the Queen Mary in Long Beach. I was just there a few weeks ago and while I didn’t tour her I did swing by for photos. I don’t know how profitable an attraction she is, but I am sure she’s not cheap to operate and maintain.

People can get very delusional about these things and let sentiment override common sense, which is part of the reason she has spent decades rotting away in Philly.[/QUOTE]

as far as I know the QUEEN MARY has never been profitable and has actually been bankrupt several times.

SSUS remains a corpse only waiting for disposal which is inevitable

Well I, for one, hope that it works out.

Indeed…

Especially in light of the fact that QM has most of her original interior furnishings and jointer bulkheads. SSUS is a bare hulk about to get barer. It will take a fortune to restore her to a museum ship.

When she was still in Norfolk all those years ago they had a big sale and auction, and I bought a couple of key fobs. That was before she was towed to Turkey for the asbestos abatement.

Nobody is wishing her ill will but if you take a look at all the money thrown at the ship over the course of its existence, only to see them now cropping out internal steel just to pay the dock fees, it’s hard to be optimistic.

I can’t see this idea of scrapping from within work out - the ship is just a shell from what pictures show. Cut stacks off and bridge deck for a maritime museum centerpiece. The time to convert into shoreside attraction was 30+ years ago.

[QUOTE=salt’n steel;125369]I can’t see this idea of scrapping from within work out - the ship is just a shell from what pictures show. Cut stacks off and bridge deck for a maritime museum centerpiece. The time to convert into shoreside attraction was 30+ years ago.[/QUOTE]

That’s actually a good thought. Gutting the interior has to be stupid expensive when you consider all the asbestos, lead paint, PCB electrical devices and other Haz Waste that needs to be dealt with.

[QUOTE=Jetryder223;125370]That’s actually a good thought. Gutting the interior has to be stupid expensive when you consider all the asbestos, lead paint, PCB electrical devices and other Haz Waste that needs to be dealt with.[/QUOTE]

Actually, the interior and all the asbestos was removed in the Ukraine and Turkey in the mid 1990’s.

[QUOTE=c.captain;125372]Actually, the interior and all the asbestos was removed in the Ukraine and Turkey in the mid 1990’s.[/QUOTE]

//youtu.be/V3FnpaWQJO0

A nice contemporary look inside the running of the ship.

//youtu.be/0_K1msy0epY

Even restored, I don’t think that the bridge would be the icon that would attract visitors to a SS UNITED STATES exhibition. Considering the size of the liner, the bridge was remarkably small, basic and austere. It had no wood fixtures or polished brass instrumentation. Everything was painted military gray.

But as a whole, she was a hell of a Blue Riband ship … 990 foot propelled at more than 35 knots by 4 propellers of 18 foot diameter turning at 165 rpm, via 4 steam turbines developing 240,000 hp all running at the same pace to cross the Atlantic in less than 3 days, 12 hours 12 minutes !

^^^^ In a lot if ways I envy those who had the opportunity to be part of that era of maritime history. What a great example of American shipbuilding industry. Sad to see how it looks now which is a good representation of what we must look like to rest of world.

You don’t have to be ashamed of anything because look what is left of the magnificent FRANCE …

… the Noze !

You think they could have saved something bigger than a few feet of bow. Ok- we know what we don’t want to do if we scrap SSUS.

Well, before changing their mind, they only kept a propeller of the SSUS !

[QUOTE=salt’n steel;125397]^^^^ In a lot if ways I envy those who had the opportunity to be part of that era of maritime history. What a great example of American shipbuilding industry. Sad to see how it looks now which is a good representation of what we must look like to rest of world.[/QUOTE]

I agree. I know she’s past her prime, I know it would take a Herculean effort to restore her, and I know it would cost a king’s ransom but in consideration of what she represents and the kind of image that we need to repair as a nation I think her rebirth would be well worth the effort. Nations need heros and right now our maritime industry needs a poster child for national, and international, recognition more than ever before. Let the SSUS be reborn!

Yes but it would be for KP folks only! Jus sayin, couldn’t help myself.

[QUOTE=PaddyWest2012;125410]I agree. I know she’s past her prime, I know it would take a Herculean effort to restore her, and I know it would cost a king’s ransom but in consideration of what she represents and the kind of image that we need to repair as a nation I think her rebirth would be well worth the effort. Nations need heros and right now our maritime industry needs a poster child for national, and international, recognition more than ever before. Let the SSUS be reborn![/QUOTE]

Ah Paddy me lad…yer far and away a sentimental Irish soul.

I know it has memories but so does the your first car from high school. Where is that now?

Nostalgia aside, do we really need an East Coast Queen Mary? Unless there is a compelling reason - historical significance or economic repurpose, it’s probably time to put the old girl to rest. Let her remains be reborn as a new ship or artificial reef.