Prospective Mariner Looking for Honest Advice

Since you’re already in the PNW, have you considered PMI’s Workboat Academy? Two years, a lot cheaper than a traditional academy, and if you don’t have other expenses you can almost pay for it through your sea segments (or so I’ve been told). Google a blog “Back to sea with me” by a guy who has just finished the program – an older (than you) guy who made a dramatic career change a couple of years ago.

Also, once you take the 1600 Mate exam, you’re good all the way to 2nd AGT – it’s just sea service on the appropriately sized vessels and routes, which shouldn’t be a problem.

To the OP, you should seriously consider The United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD. Look at what a 20 year man has for retirement benefits, healthcare, and pension. You will have the best training healthcare, and overall job security in the world.

The maritime industry seems to have way to many people in it that are idiots, that think they are Gods gift to this earth.

And the navy is full of shining pillars of seamanship and intelligence…

[QUOTE=lm1883;157808]Fixed that for you.[/QUOTE]

Yeah you fixed it alright, I hope one of the moderators bans you for that bullshit.

That is the basis for libel.

Rather than start a new thread I found enough common ground to piggy back here. I am 30 and was at a traditional maritime academy when I started college but transferred, did other things, became an Army Officer, blah blah blah. Now I am out of the military and want to go back to sea. Don’t really feel like doing the whole traditional academy thing again. Don’t feel like doing the whole OS thing. So I stumbled onto the Workboat Academy. It seems literally IDEALLY suited to people like me. Maybe a little older or maybe looking to get back into the field with a license or to upgrade etc. It appears they pair you up with a company and they claim 95% success rate of being hired after your time with said company. In an industry and a forum that is clogged with people posting about “how do I get a job” or “how do I get started” (I have been one of said people) this seems almost too good to be true. Is this a legit school and most importantly do you think that 90-95% figure is accurate? If so I think I may make the leap!

[QUOTE=gman1984;162310]Is this a legit school and most importantly do you think that 90-95% figure is accurate? [/QUOTE]

yes…

I guess what threw me for a loop was after having been on this forum for some time and following maritime events ever since I left the Academy it seems amazingly simple. Everyone wants to know how to get an entry level job. Well, obviously if the success rate is 95% and you get a license and higher pay why are people posting about knocking on doors, or endless applications rejected, or just a general lack of a clue for how to break into this industry? Like I said…it seems almost TOO simple. What is the downside? Hell, at this rate I’ll just sign up next week!

[QUOTE=Traitor Yankee;157793]And the navy is full of shining pillars of seamanship and intelligence…[/QUOTE]

Just be thankful the remainder of the world’s navies are more incompetent than ours.

[QUOTE=RespectMyAuthority;162321]Just be thankful the remainder of the world’s navies are more incompetent than ours.[/QUOTE]

how on earth can that be?

Bahahaha, touché sailor, I just spit goombay punch all over myself!

[QUOTE=c.captain;162322]how on earth can that be?[/QUOTE]

It is hard to do seeing how our navy sets the bar so low but most underperform ours. Also, our technology helps to make our navy’s incompetence less obvious.

I remember the “Iranian Navy” calling our ship during the first Gulf War. They wanted us to stop even though we were in international waters. The entire time he spoke on the VHF, I could hear the outboard motor running.

The second go around, the Iranian Navy called me and I asked for the position of the ship they were calling. They gave me their position. I answered them back “That is not my position! Goodbye”. I think they were a little peeved…

[QUOTE=RespectMyAuthority;162324]It is hard to do seeing how our navy sets the bar so low but most underperform ours. Also, our technology helps to make our navy’s incompetence less obvious.

I remember the “Iranian Navy” calling our ship during the first Gulf War. They wanted us to stop even though we were in international waters. The entire time he spoke on the VHF, I could hear the outboard motor running.

The second go around, the Iranian Navy called me and I asked for the position of the ship they were calling. They gave me their position. I answered them back “That is not my position! Goodbye”. I think they were a little peeved…[/QUOTE]

You did not " Respect Their Authority":cool:

[QUOTE=AHTS Master;162325]You did not " Respect Their Authority":cool:[/QUOTE]
No I did not. I was young and foolish. Now I am older but not necessarily any wiser.

[QUOTE=gman1984;162310]Rather than start a new thread I found enough common ground to piggy back here. I am 30 and was at a traditional maritime academy when I started college but transferred, did other things, became an Army Officer, blah blah blah. Now I am out of the military and want to go back to sea. Don’t really feel like doing the whole traditional academy thing again. Don’t feel like doing the whole OS thing. So I stumbled onto the Workboat Academy. It seems literally IDEALLY suited to people like me. Maybe a little older or maybe looking to get back into the field with a license or to upgrade etc. It appears they pair you up with a company and they claim 95% success rate of being hired after your time with said company. In an industry and a forum that is clogged with people posting about “how do I get a job” or “how do I get started” (I have been one of said people) this seems almost too good to be true. Is this a legit school and most importantly do you think that 90-95% figure is accurate? If so I think I may make the leap![/QUOTE]

Yes it is a legit school. I think the 90-95% placement was probably true during the boom when OSV companies were throwing money at anyone with a heartbeat. I don’t know where you are located, but would recommend the one in either Boston or Seattle since the one in New Orleans will be more geared toward OSVs which are not hiring at all for the foreseeable future.

This is definitely a legit school. I have taken several classes at the Baltimore Campus, owned by MMP. All of the instructors that I encountered were Blue Water ,Unlimited Masters with many years of experience. I have worked on a couple vessels with “Workboat Mates” from MITAGS and most of them were a little older and very serious about their careers. I have a good friend that recently graduated from this program and I would say the program , in Baltimore, is excellent. The person/lady in charge of said program … Not so much.

[QUOTE=Kennebec Captain;157556]There is a risk of a slowdown in hiring coinciding with the time you graduate.

The other thing, not a word about being a sea-going professional. I don’t like sailing with crew who’s goal is to squeeze every last nickel possible out of the operation. Who wants to sail with someone hoping the engine is going to swallow an exhaust valve because according to their excel spreadsheet that’s a gain of $800 OT? If the money grubbers are not on excel then they are on the cell phone juggling bills to stay solvent or in the captain’s office asking why the direct deposit hasn’t’ hit their account after 8 hours.

I’d rather have officers that can take the long view. Of course money is important but if the focus is on professional development and looking out for the ship the money will follow. If your only worry is your debt you can’t do that.[/QUOTE]

I am sorry but this has to be some of the weirdest most paranoid reasoning I have ever heard. Some of the BEST people I have worked with were into debt up to their ears. Thats just how they managed their money. Yes, some always wan overtime and some don’t. On the contrary some of the BEST people I have worked with had more than $ enough to retire at a young age and were still money hungry for every ounce of overtime they could get. Again, I don’t mean to offend you but your prospective on an officer wanting or causing bad things to the operation because they want overtime is a bit paranoid. What if you had a guy who didn’t care about overtime and didn’t take it when needed or was just very complacent…

Finally, I haven’t met many (if any at all) mariners that show up to watch absolutely thrilled everyday and who are there because their love of moving commercial cargo from point a to point b. Don’t get me wrong I can’t ever picture myself doing anything else. However, if $20 million suddenly showed up in my account you wouldn’t catch me at sea on a commercial ship. We are all there for the same reason at the end of the day. How much debt we are in shouldn’t bear much on how professionally each mariner approaches his/her job.

[QUOTE=devdrill;162520]I am sorry but this has to be some of the weirdest most paranoid reasoning I have ever heard. Some of the BEST people I have worked with were into debt up to their ears. Thats just how they managed their money. Yes, some always wan overtime and some don’t. On the contrary some of the BEST people I have worked with had more than $ enough to retire at a young age and were still money hungry for every ounce of overtime they could get. Again, I don’t mean to offend you but your prospective on an officer wanting or causing bad things to the operation because they want overtime is a bit paranoid. What if you had a guy who didn’t care about overtime and didn’t take it when needed or was just very complacent…

Finally, I haven’t met many (if any at all) mariners that show up to watch absolutely thrilled everyday and who are there because their love of moving commercial cargo from point a to point b. Don’t get me wrong I can’t ever picture myself doing anything else. However, if $20 million suddenly showed up in my account you wouldn’t catch me at sea on a commercial ship. We are all there for the same reason at the end of the day. How much debt we are in shouldn’t bear much on how professionally each mariner approaches his/her job.[/QUOTE]

Yes, that post might have been a little over the top.

I have no objection to people wanting to make good money, that’s one of the things that attracted me to the industry. In my defense the OP and other like him seem to have failed and are now looking around for a quick buck. I think prospective mariners have to have a little respect for the profession itself, it’s not just about money. It’s better for the industry if those just looking for a quick buck look eleswhere.

[QUOTE=Kennebec Captain;162537]In my defense the OP and other like him seem to have failed and are now looking around for a quick buck. I think prospective mariners have to have a little respect for the profession itself, it’s not just about money. It’s better for the industry if those just looking for a quick buck look eleswhere.[/QUOTE]

  1. I have nothing but the utmost respect the maritime industry and mariners. Maybe that’s why I solicited advice from professional mariners? What a novel concept.

  2. How could you possibly infer I’m a failure from a few paragraphs of text? That’s laughable. For your information, I’m a college graduate and well on my way to financial independence. For that matter, my decision to attend a maritime academy isn’t in my financial interests, but I’m doing so because I want something more out of life. Have fun being miserable and bitter.

I myself is considering to join the maritime industry too. A friend of mine have been pushing me to sail the past five years, and since my finances are straight I figured why not. I was considering an academy, but I’d rather be out there working and not sitting in a classroom.

I was offered a 100T Captains job and have owned and boated all my life. I did my 90 days as a Senior Deck Hand/Captain in training and went to Sea School. For me it’s a great retirement gig running a 65ft/95 ton steel hull riverboat in PA. Company that hired me paid for all my expenses. Great pay but seasonal work. Looking forward to a near costal/offshore upgrade to run in FL over the winter. Having deck experience is a huge asset even on a 65ft boat. Running twin diesels is so much fun and getting paid to burn fuel. Not sure I’ll ever do 500T but having fun now…good luck!