Lets Hear Of Strange Cargoes Carried

[QUOTE=Skiing Salem Sailor;104176]In 2005 aboard the Cape Trinity, our last piece of cargo we loaded in Kuwait was a Sherman tank the Polish special forces found in the desert. It was pretty well stripped clean and pretty beat up but there was very little rust as I recall. They brought in a crane to put in on the deck then about 100 Polish folks came aboard for a picture. It was headed for a full rebuild and a spot in a WW2 museum. This load was the last of the Polish equipment as they pulled out from Iraq. It was one hell of a scenic fall ride up the river to Szczcecin.

just googled it and apparently it not totally a Sherman.
http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?135937-Sherman-tank-in-Iraq[/QUOTE] Small world! I took the Polish Medical and Aviation Battalions over there from Rota, Spain to Kuwait! Loading those MI-24 Hind helicopters was a regular clownshow!

There is a tank barge in Seattle dedicated to lightering molasses (I was told it was for livestock feed) off the Matson ships from Hi. The ship’s tank for the molasses has has heaters to allow it to be pumped off the ship but the barge doesn’t since it is a short trip up the Dawamish from Harbor Is. My uncle was aboard tug shifting the barge one time when they arrived to offload and couldn’t start the pumps. I can’t remember how they dealt with the situation but repairs were rather urgent since the product was cooling and at some point would be too viscous to pump.

[QUOTE=seadog6608;104141]When I was on the Singapore to Diego run, we had the chandler bring us pig heads for the Philipino stevedores in Diego. We gave them to individuals who did a particularly good job. One night a few of us brought some beer and booze over to the village and partied with these guys. We ate that stuff. It wasn’t bad really as long as you could wrap your brain around what you were eating.[/QUOTE]

Now that I think on it, we occasionally brought goat carcasses for the few muslim workers from Mauritius,.

My father ran tugs in the Arctic, mostly around Prudhoe Bay for years. Each summer they hauled fuel/stores out to the small islands that were used as whale camps. At the end of the season they would go back out pick up the natives and their whale meat to bring back to the mainland.

While serving in the USCG at Cape Disappointment on the Columbia River, I had a case to run in which a fishing vessel, a dragger, had a body in their nets. A headless one. My guys had to kick around for a while trying to find the missing head, with no luck, fortunately. It was apparently a burial at sea gone bad. He was dressed up real nice in a suit! They re-boxed him with the proper weight and we took him back out later…

[QUOTE=rjbpilot;104198]While serving in the USCG at Cape Disappointment on the Columbia River, I had a case to run in which a fishing vessel, a dragger, had a body in their nets. A headless one. My guys had to kick around for a while trying to find the missing head, with no luck, fortunately. It was apparently a burial at sea gone bad. He was dressed up real nice in a suit! They re-boxed him with the proper weight and we took him back out later…[/QUOTE]

We did a burial at sea one time but it was a box of ashes.

Ah the old “Rollie” is the barge you are referring to. She is still in service for Salmon Bay Barge Lines. I hear she is relocating to Astoria to do more of the same.

Cuban Refugees
While stationed in USS SAVANNAH (AOR4) in 1994 we were sailing between GTMO and the Haitian Claw. We ended up fishing out a family of Cubans floating in a WAY too small ‘raft’. I was stunned that any one would subject their family to that but there it was. While completing an UNREP with USS CARON (DD970) you can see that they TOO were waylaid with refugees:
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Hii.i want to start a career at sea.I have my twic and will apply for the z-card soon.I want to know beforehand,what does the USCG testing,physical and drug comprise of.What do they test for and for the physical part, what specifically do you have to do.Thanks

We picked up some Vietnamese Boat people when I worked on the USNS Ponchatula in 1985 and dropped them of in Singapore at a UN resettlement center. They camped out in the officers lounge on cots.

Do crew members count? Some sit around like cargo…and can be very strange.

[QUOTE=tillettso;104271]Do crew members count? Some sit around like cargo…and can be very strange.[/QUOTE]

When I sailed with SeaLand, the Chief kept a list of the engine department members. He came up to me one day and showed it to me. Next to some of their names was the letter, “P”. He asked me, “Third, do you know what the “P” means?” I told him that I didn’t. He responded, “Passengers”, turned and walked away. From what I recall, it was a fairly accurate assessment.

[QUOTE=cmakin;104307]When I sailed with SeaLand, the Chief kept a list of the engine department members. He came up to me one day and showed it to me. Next to some of their names was the letter, “P”. He asked me, “Third, do you know what the “P” means?” I told him that I didn’t. He responded, “Passengers”, turned and walked away. From what I recall, it was a fairly accurate assessment.[/QUOTE]

I have sailed with many MED’s. They are just members of the engine dept. Not too qualified if you get my drift and not just the unlicensed folks. I told one new third he needed to find another line of work as he was not an engineer, (welder,pipe fitter, electrician, hydraulics, machinist, handyman). Every job I gave him he left for me or another engineer to finish. I asked one guy, " Can you weld?" His reply. “I can tack a little”. He was used as a beast of burden for the 90 days he worked for me, Many new people just needed some direction, some were ballast.

[QUOTE=Too bad steam is gone;104315]I have sailed with many MED’s. They are just members of the engine dept. Not too qualified if you get my drift and not just the unlicensed folks. I told one new third he needed to find another line of work as he was not an engineer, (welder,pipe fitter, electrician, hydraulics, machinist, handyman). Every job I gave him he left for me or another engineer to finish. I asked one guy, " Can you weld?" His reply. “I can tack a little”. He was used as a beast of burden for the 90 days he worked for me, Many new people just needed some direction, some were ballast.[/QUOTE] That’s funny. I have used the word “ballast” to describe useless people on my ships in the past.

Going back to the early & mid eighties, decking for SC Loveland on their “Miss Holly”…to describe some of the unusual cargoes.

“Cappy” Loveland had an extensive fleet of flat deck barges. They ranged in size from small ninety footers to large heavily built coastwise/ocean barges.

We often transported those large bronze propellers from the machining shops at the Philadelphia Naval Yard for submarines built at GD Groton, CT. Completely disassembled container cranes built by Paceco in Escatawpa, MS were towed from this plant to destinations along the east coast. Our small tug (78ft, 800hp) would bring the barge down from Escatawpa to a meeting point in the Gulf where a larger oceangoing tug did the long distance towing.

Sections of nuclear submarines being constructed in Newport News, VA were transported by deck barge from Pensacola. I stood many watches on the Intracoastal Waterway northbound from Jupiter Inlet, pulling bridges and confined areas by two way radio (in pushing gear, there was a 50 foot wall of steel in front of the steersman).

Loveland carried just about anything imaginable on his deck barges.

Little did I know at the time, but Cappy Loveland was an instrumental figure in the planning and execution of the Allied invasion of Normandy.

A company man on a rig had to have his sunday paper. 10 hours roundtrip and 1600 gallons of fuel for 4 sunday papers. I had the shoreside crew bind them down with chains on the back deck. Back in 1979

We picked up a spot job one year to take an ice chest to a rig about 170 miles out. This was mid-April. Come to find out, it was crawfish for Good Friday. A side note. We were not a crew boat. We were a 220’ supply boat getting paid about $5000 a day, but whatever it takes to have fresh crawfish on Good Friday.

Frogs from Kaohsiung Taiwan back to San Pedro. They were refrigerated, I believe they sleep that way.

There was a post earlier about cattle being loose on one of Matsons Ro-Ro’s. I’ve seen photos of of it.

That’s shit is nasty. Was First on an APL ship that picked up camel hides in Egypt and took them to Sing. deck department was washing down the leaking container and the shit ran down into the cargo holds. When the mate had to pump out the holds the pump sprung a leak and all that hide juice ended up in the ER bilge. I was ready to chew out the third thinking his shit tank overflowed. ER stunk for a few days

Makes me want to puke just thinking about it. It’s amazing what things smell like when the temperature outside is 110+. Let alone 130+ in the engine room.