Havyard to construct icebreaker for Russia


#1

http://www.havyard.com/news/havyard-to-construct-ice-breaker-for-russia

EVP Sales Tor Leif Mongstad of Havyard Group has great expectations for the market of icebreaking offshore vessels in northern Russia.Havyard has agreed a contract with the Russian shipping company FEMCO about design and construction of a Havyard 843 Ice, an icebreaking offshore vessel.

The vessel will be designed by Havyard Design & Solutions in Fosnavaag, Norway and is going to be constructed at Havyard Ship Technology`s shipyard in Leirvik in Sogn, Norway. The vessel will become newbuild no.122 and is due to be delivered in September 2015. The Russian shipping company has also secured an option for the construction of one further Havyard 843 Ice.

[B]Experience with Russia and icebreakers[/B]
Havyard has gained good experience in constructing icebreakers for Russian shipowners. In 2006, Havyard delivered two icebreaking offshore vessels for the Russian shipping company Sevmorneftegaz (currently Gazprom Neft Shelf).

  • The fact that we have experience in cooperating with Russian shipping companies and having already delivered similar vessels to Russia, were probably both important factors in getting this contract in competition with other European shipyards, says Executive Vice President Sales Tor Leif Mongstad of Havyard Group. – We are among the shipyards in the world that have delivered most icebreaking offshore vessels. Havyard has previously constructed 7 icebreaking offshore vessels and this is a third of all the icebreakers that DnV has classified of this type worldwide.
  • Gaining this type of contract proves that we are competitive on price, delivery time and quality, says Mongstad. 5 vessels constructed by Havyard are currently sailing under a Russian flag, included 2 AHTSs of a Havyard 842 design and the ice breaker “Vidar Viking”.

[B]Great expectations for new design[/B]
EVP Sales Tor Leif Mongstad of Havyard Group has great expectations for the market of icebreaking offshore vessels in northern Russia.

Havyard 843 Ice is a new design from the Herøy-based design company Havyard Design & Solutions. The vessel is going to have DnV ice class Icebreaker Ice 10 and Winterized Cold (-30 °C). Amongst other things, the vessel can break ice that`s more than 1 metre thick and has systems for avoiding icing of the vessel. The vessel is otherwise designed to carry out anchor handling, towing and standby operations for oil protection and rescue services.

  • We also have great expectations towards the market that is opening up with major activity in Russian territories in the north and we believe this contract will make Havyard even more attractive for the Russian interests who are looking for this type of tonnage, Mongstad continues. – With the new Havyard 843 Ice design, we have positioned ourselves well in order to compete for contracts that the market will offer in the future. We also have other icebreaking designs in our portfolio and we have the ability to quickly adapt our designs for whatever needs the customer may have.
  • We are well equipped to compete in this market and we think there may be similar contracts ahead, concludes a hopeful EVP Sales.

[B]Shipping company with ambitions[/B]
FEMCO Group was established in 2004 and is the only privately-owned company in Russia that has specialized in operating anchor-handling vessels. The company operates a fleet of 12 offshore vessels and with this latest Havyard order; they now have presently 5 newbuild orders at various shipyards.
FEMCO has varied experience in the operations of vessels both in tropical and arctic waters, and are used to meeting challenges in tough weather conditions and doing advanced operations. By contracting an icebreaking offshore vessel with Havyard now, it is part of a long-term fleet renewal strategy in order to offer services for the offshore oil activities in arctic areas.
In addition to their offshore fleet FEMCO also operates a fleet of dry-cargo vessels, some of these having ice class.

[B]Plenty of work[/B]
With this one, Havyard Group has 8 newbuilds and a major conversion on order at the Leirvik shipyard in Sogn, Norway, with an order reserve in the business area of shipbuilding of just under NOK 3 billion. Like the other vessels being constructed at the shipyard, Havyard Design & Solutions deliver both design and detail engineering for the production of the vessel. In addition, Havyard Power & Systems based in Aalesund, will deliver electro engineering, automation- and alarm systems and Havyard Concept Bridge. Norwegian Electric Systems, where Havyard owns 40 % of the shares, will deliver electrical motors, generators and switchboards. The contract will also lead to extended effects within the maritime cluster in Western Norway, in the shape of equipment deliveries and services to the shipyard during construction of the vessel.

[B]Main data Havyard 843 Ice[/B]
Length: 86 m
Breadth: 19.5 m
Depth: 7.75 m
Speed: 16 knots
Bollard pull: 185 tonnes
Accommodation: 34 persons

In my opinion, the design is pretty conservative.


#2

well, with a bit (or a lot?) of luck they’ll be designing & building some for the US over the next few years, who knows?

[B]Alaska, Washington senators introduce amendment to build 4 icebreakers[/B]

The U.S. Navy would be authorized to build up to four heavy-duty polar icebreakers for U.S. Coast Guard use under a bipartisan amendment inserted last week into a military authorization bill that was sponsored by senators from Alaska and Washington state.

The amendment would give the U.S. Navy authority to contract for the vessels and have them built, then transfer ownership to the Coast Guard, the only service with responsibility for icebreaker missions, according to the amendment language.

The amendment sponsors – Sens. Lisa Murkowski and Mark Begich of Alaska and Maria Cantwell and Patty Murray of Washington – issued a joint statement Monday describing what they say is a pressing need for expanded icebreaker capacity to keep pace with other nations’ Arctic initiatives, to support the region’s maritime industry and to boost national security while serving Alaskans’ emergency needs.

They also referenced the new Department of Defense Arctic strategy, unveiled Friday by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel.

“With Defense Secretary Hagel announcing last Friday that the nation’s military will be very involved in the Arctic region, moving forward towards an Arctic future means icebreakers; this bill would help deliver on that,” Murkowski said in the statement.

Begich cited the mission two winters ago to deliver fuel to Nome, a goal that required help from a Russian icebreaking vessel. That incident “demonstrated the need for enhanced icebreaking capability to meet the needs of residents of America’s Arctic as well as our nation’s security needs,” he said in the statement.

“Icebreakers protect America’s Arctic interests and support Washington state shipbuilding jobs,” Cantwell said in the statement.

The United States has only two icebreakers useable in the Arctic, the Healy and the Polar Star, compared to 33 in Russia, the senators said in their statement.

The underlying bill, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013, is annual legislation that authorizes military pay and benefits as well as certain policy initiatives, Murkowski spokesman Matthew Felling said Monday.

That bill is expected to be passed by the end of December, and passage will include a decision on the Alaska and Washington senators’ amendment, he said.

It typically takes eight years to build an icebreaker, Felling said.

http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/20131125/alaska-washington-senators-introduce-amendment-build-4-icebreakers


#3

It typically takes eight years to build an icebreaker.

No it doesn’t. The Russians started building Viktor Chernomyrdin in October 2012 and it is expected to enter service in late 2015. They also laid down the next generation nuclear icebreaker last month and the vessel, the largest and most powerful icebreaker ever built, be ready by the end of 2017. The Finns signed a contract for the design of a new escort icebreaker this year and it will be delivered during the winter of 2016. Since 2012, Arctech has built a number of icebreakers within 2-3 years of signing the contract. Of course, the Canadians pushed the delivery date of the Diefenbreaker well into the 2020s, but that does not mean that building an icebreaker on the Western hemisphere has to be a decade-long process. If there was political will, designing a capable polar icebreaker would be relatively straightforward.

Oh, and Russia does not have 33 icebreakers “in the Arctic”. After browsing through the list of icebreakers, I counted six nuclear icebreakers and seven heavy diesel-electric ones (one of which was retrofitted with a Thyssen-Waas bow and subsequntly demoted to Baltic service after it was found out to be crap), and one of each under construction.


#4

Why are these new icebreakers spec’d to Norwegian (DNV) and Russian ice classes? There’s a set of internationally recognized Polar Ice Classes, established in 2008 that would seem more appropriate.


#5

[QUOTE=coldstack;127041]Why are these new icebreakers spec’d to Norwegian (DNV) and Russian ice classes? There’s a set of internationally recognized Polar Ice Classes, established in 2008 that would seem more appropriate.[/QUOTE]

I don’t think the Russians will ever accept only the IACS Polar Classes. You can get an equivalent PC notation, but you probably still have to design the vessel according to the RMRS ice class rules.


#6

[QUOTE=“Tups;127043”]

I don’t think the Russians will ever accept only the IACS Polar Classes. You can get an equivalent PC notation, but you probably still have to design the vessel according to the RMRS ice class rules.[/QUOTE]

This is frustrating. Especially since the Russians were part of the IACS PC development (& RMRS is an IACS member). But the Russian’s will accept a DNV class notation?


#7

Even if RMRS participated in the PC development, the local instances (such as the NSR administration) may still place additional requirements to special purpose vessels operating in Russian waters. It’s the same in the Baltic.


#8

Tonight, a revolutionary Russian icebreaker saw the stars for the first time:

It’ll still take couple of months until it can taste the true freedom of the seas, but even the outfitting quay is better than being hidden inside the assembly hall…


#9

Not pure icebreakers, but DSME is building pretty nice icebreaking LNG tankers for the Yamal project. Click the guy’s face under “Icebreaker tankers for innovative shipping” to start the video.

Finns are also building new icebreakers, first for the Russians and then for themselves:

maritimeintel.com/arctech-helsinki-begins-hull-assembly-of-third-russian-icebreaker/ (100 million €)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/liikennevirasto/sets/72157640959525874/ (123 million €)

In the meantime, I wonder how many icebreakers are under construction in the US and Canada and how much do they cost… :confused:


#10

[QUOTE=Tups;130963]Not pure icebreakers, but DSME is building pretty nice icebreaking LNG tankers for the Yamal project. Click the guy’s face under “Icebreaker tankers for innovative shipping” to start the video.

Finns are also building new icebreakers, first for the Russians and then for themselves:

maritimeintel.com/arctech-helsinki-begins-hull-assembly-of-third-russian-icebreaker/ (100 million €)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/liikennevirasto/sets/72157640959525874/ (123 million €)

In the meantime, I wonder how many icebreakers are under construction in the US and Canada and how much do they cost… :/[/QUOTE]

I was wondering this too. Are Russia building another icebreaker to get into the Arctic race? It seems like Canada and the U.S. are particularly behind on this.


#11

Havyard bags two more orders for discount offshore icebreakers:

http://www.ihsmaritime360.com/article/15534/havyard-gets-double-icebreaker-order

Just a hair under $75 million per vessel. However, don’t expect fancy azimuth thrusters or other advanced features.


#12

[QUOTE=Tups;148409]Havyard bags two more orders for discount offshore icebreakers:

http://www.ihsmaritime360.com/article/15534/havyard-gets-double-icebreaker-order

Just a hair under $75 million per vessel. However, don’t expect fancy azimuth thrusters or other advanced features.[/QUOTE]

The hull will be built in Turkey and outfitted in Norway.

http://www.tu.no/industri/2014/11/21/havyard-bygger-isbrytere-for-offshoreoppdrag (use Google Chrome translate)

It will be built to DNV Ice-10, it will have a bollard pull of 185 tonn and will be used as a AHTS in the summer months.