Grounding of Yacht Archangel in Penobscot Bay

70 Ft Sailing Yacht Archangel went aground and was dismasted in Penobscot Bay.

Panbo has a post about it here: Summer bummer, please don’t blame charts or electronics

Ledges in Maine are no joke !!

[QUOTE=Flyer69;117321]Ledges in Maine are no joke !![/QUOTE]

From the comments looks like they might have been dodging lobster pots and lost track of their position. I can see that happening. I don’t know how formal navigation is on a yacht like that but I am a believer in “no-go areas” marked on the chart.

Probably not very formal at all.
“Dodging lobster pots” is an excuse, albeit a poor one. Based on what I saw on the chart, he got too close to the ledge and “dodged” towards the hazard when he should have “dodged” away from the hazard …

…or saw a nice open patch of water with no pots…

[QUOTE=Flyer69;117341]Probably not very formal at all.
“Dodging lobster pots” is an excuse, albeit a poor one. Based on what I saw on the chart, he got too close to the ledge and “dodged” towards the hazard when he should have “dodged” away from the hazard …[/QUOTE]

Yes, not an excuse, a factor. What ever “system” was being used it got a 1000 to 1 test on that passage and it failed.

One of the incidents that led to the Crew Resource Management was the crash of Eastern Airlines flight 401 in the Everglades.There were various factors but the main one was human factors- over-focusing or “cognitive tunneling”. In the case of FLT 401 it was a burnt out cockpit light which would have indicated the landing gear was down.

Possibly the crew of the Archangel had several tasks, dealing with the guests, avoiding the pots and safely navigating past the rock ledges. Each task by itself is relativity simple but managing all of the tasks together requires that the captain take a step back, monitor the big picture and ensure that the immediate but less critical task of dodging pots does not replace the less immediate but more critical task of navigation.

On a small vessel planning and executing a safe passage through the ledges is likely considered a single task to be done by a single person… However the planning and executing can be done separately with the planning part shifted to a time when no other tasks interfere.

If the planning is recorded in form of a track-lines, waypoints and no-go areas rather then just in someone’s head it becomes a form of expertise accessible to less experienced crew members.

In that scenario the captain can assign the simple task of monitoring the navigation to a less experienced crew member while the more experienced captain navigates by eye while dealing with the more difficult but less critical task of dodging pots.

That’s how it was done the one time I went sailing here in Maine, a 40(?) foot steel boat with a group of kids aboard. One old-timer didn’t work on deck but stayed below. When we were in confined waters he kept an eye on the electronic display while the owner handled the boat. He never said anything as we managed to stay clear but he was there watching.