GMDSS Sub-Forum


#41

[QUOTE=rbc;140116]I’ll be operating some HF gear in the morning.[/QUOTE]
Tomorrow is field day.


#42

Exactly :wink:


#43

Ham radio amateurs…same as band geeks


#44

[QUOTE=c.captain;140123]Ham radio amateurs…same as band geeks[/QUOTE]
I never heard any complaints from the crews when they were getting phone patches home. Many were free calls.


#45

[ATTACH]3976[/ATTACH]
Still available at Amazon.com.


#46

Did you guys listen to this weeks gCaptain radio. It was all abt modern coms. Pretty good discussion.


#47

The future is sat service but local cell network on board
Dial 911 on your cell phone and the local kits adds the gmdss data and inmarsat routes it to the correct place.
Job done, very simple.
Ok we keep the vhf…
Ps i am sure if greenpeace knew how much paper is wasted on board on a gmdss/dp vessel it would stop…


#48

[QUOTE=powerabout;140144]The future is sat service but local cell network on board
Dial 911 on your cell phone and the local kits adds the gmdss data and inmarsat routes it to the correct place.
Job done, very simple.
Ok we keep the vhf…
Ps i am sure if greenpeace knew how much paper is wasted on board on a gmdss/dp vessel it would stop…[/QUOTE]

I think it’s only a matter of time before the GMDSS consoles get replaced by an application on some kind of slate computer. I bet the only hardware will be the radios and some shipboard gateway for the slates to connect to. I’ve seen some passenger ships advertising full time cell phone access, albeit with roaming. I bet we’ll see a lot more of that too.

There will be a cost though. The Internet is the wild west, with all kinds of security problems. If ships use the Internet as a backhaul, that will need to be addressed.

      • Updated - - -

[QUOTE=LI_Domer;140138]Did you guys listen to this weeks gCaptain radio. It was all abt modern coms. Pretty good discussion.[/QUOTE]

I really enjoyed that podcast. It was a good conversation.


#49

[QUOTE=rbc;140159]There will be a cost though. The Internet is the wild west, with all kinds of security problems. If ships use the Internet as a backhaul, that will need to be addressed.[/QUOTE]

WTF are you talking about? Every GODDAMNED offshore vessel and many in other sectors of the maritime industry are fitted with fulltime satellite internet links and almost all business with the shore is conducted over VOIP lines. A person can pick up a phone and call a USCG duty officer in a fraction of the time to try to reach them by radio in case of an emergency and drillrigs are sending realtime streaming data from the driller’s cabin to shore managers constantly to be monitored. I would not be surprised if automation exists to take over emergency functions on a rig or platform from ashore even today if there is a breakdown in the human element offshore.

I have no clue whatsoever you are talking of when you speak of security problems with the system or what you mean by “backhaul”?

Don’t come on here pontificating if you are not in the industry today and haven’t been in the industry in over 20 years (or worse were in the Navee 20 years ago) You are not on the same planet as the rest of us here! Now, go back to your pointy pencil neck geek word of ham radio and cloud computing…I am growing weary of you!


#50

[QUOTE=c.captain;140160]WTF are you talking about? Every GODDAMNED offshore vessel and many in other sectors of the maritime industry are fitted with fulltime satellite internet links and almost all business with the shore is conducted over VOIP lines. A person can pick up a phone and call a USCG duty officer in a fraction of the time to try to reach them by radio in case of an emergency and drillrigs are sending realtime streaming data from the driller’s cabin to shore managers constantly to be monitored. I would not be surprised if automation exists to take over emergency functions on a rig or platform from ashore even today if there is a breakdown in the human element offshore.

I have no clue whatsoever you are talking of when you speak of security problems with the system or what you mean by “backhaul”?

Don’t come on here pontificating if you are not in the industry today and haven’t been in the industry in over 20 years (or worse were in the Navee 20 years ago) You are not on the same planet as the rest of us here! Now, go back to your pointy pencil neck geek word of ham radio and cloud computing…I am growing weary of you![/QUOTE]

Wow, you must have been really bugged to type all that. If you think I was pontificating, then I apologize for not being more clear. That was not my intent.

You’re right. I haven’t been to sea in 20 years. I’ve been running Internet systems for 20 years. I’m on a team that runs about 2000 servers, plus the networks to support them.

As for Internet security, there are problems out there. If you think that your encrypted connections with your web browser are perfectly safe, you should try a google search for “openssl heartbleed” sometime. It’s a bit of a scandal. There are still lots of web sites that aren’t patched. There are lots of servers on the Internet that were setup, and are not carefully managed.

I know that people are holding Skype conferences on the ships. We do the same in my current company every day. I just meant to say that the promise and problems of the Internet are coming to the ship.

Yea, I love the HF stuff, but it’s a hobby. I recognize that it’s a backup on the ships these days at most.

In any case, sorry to make you weary.


#51

It should be a real treat when the first DP vessel is hijacked over the Internet connection and slammed into a oil rig. All that’s in the way is someone forgetting to pull the plug after a update or remote service of the DP system.


#52

MT can be accessed in real time 24/7


#53

[QUOTE=Traitor Yankee;140168]MT can be accessed in real time 24/7[/QUOTE]
And k-pos runs on Windows xp. Talk about risk.


#54

[QUOTE=rbc;140166]In any case, sorry to make you weary.[/QUOTE]

just don’t keep going Rah, Rah…GMDSS when the rest of us loathe it like an open sore that won’t heal and go away.

most professional mariners today hate the damned station and curse it daily after endless nonsense alarms go off forcing us to silence them.

the system is about as an big of a failure as TWIC!


#55

And distracting the mate on watch from looking for real potential dangers.


#56

The GMDSS system at the IMO originally was not going to get rid of the radio operator/technician (RO). Once the shipping companies figure out they would not require the RO they dropped that billet. The Mates thought they would pick up some money as GMDSS operators but that did not happen. The system with all of its faults does work well for sending distress. Recently there is an effort at the IMO to modernize the GMDSS, but the effort to bring on new equipment is hindered by any increase in costs. Inmarsat-C terminals are archaic by todays standards, but they provide Maritime Safety Information (MSI) when beyond the range of NAVTEX. They also are useful but you have to learn how to operate them. I have sailed as an RO/Technican and also worked as a shore tech and found that most Mates do not know how to operate the GMDSS equipment. They do not like the system because they do not understand how to use it. With the demise of the HF shore stations throughout the world HF is relegated to sending distress. The NBDP telex is a required for MSI in Polar regions but is not otherwise useful for comms. I have taught GMDSS and I tell the students the alarms are annoying but you have to understand the false distress alerts are sent by people. When ROs were on the ships I never heard a false distress SOS. Satellite will evetually replace all of HF in the future and with that will come the modernization of equipment. Cyber security is the buzz word at the IMO, CIRM, and IALA. This is a real concern because of the automation on modern ships. So where is GMDSS headed? As long as the Red button gets a response it will remain. The best hope to reduce annoying false alarms is for folks to learn the equipment and also penalties for sending a false distress. Sun is rising so gotta get my coffee on the port bridge wing.


#57

[QUOTE=LNG Gemini;163979]The GMDSS system at the IMO originally was not going to get rid of the radio operator/technician (RO). Once the shipping companies figure out they would not require the RO they dropped that billet. The Mates thought they would pick up some money as GMDSS operators but that did not happen. The system with all of its faults does work well for sending distress. Recently there is an effort at the IMO to modernize the GMDSS, but the effort to bring on new equipment is hindered by any increase in costs. Inmarsat-C terminals are archaic by todays standards, but they provide Maritime Safety Information (MSI) when beyond the range of NAVTEX. They also are useful but you have to learn how to operate them. I have sailed as an RO/Technican and also worked as a shore tech and found that most Mates do not know how to operate the GMDSS equipment. They do not like the system because they do not understand how to use it. With the demise of the HF shore stations throughout the world HF is relegated to sending distress. The NBDP telex is a required for MSI in Polar regions but is not otherwise useful for comms. I have taught GMDSS and I tell the students the alarms are annoying but you have to understand the false distress alerts are sent by people. When ROs were on the ships I never heard a false distress SOS. Satellite will evetually replace all of HF in the future and with that will come the modernization of equipment. Cyber security is the buzz word at the IMO, CIRM, and IALA. This is a real concern because of the automation on modern ships. So where is GMDSS headed? As long as the Red button gets a response it will remain. The best hope to reduce annoying false alarms is for folks to learn the equipment and also penalties for sending a false distress. Sun is rising so gotta get my coffee on the port bridge wing.[/QUOTE]

Things may have changed but on the ships I use to sail on the (MM&P) mates got a GMDSS stipend.


#58

A lot of the equipment is still useful but the system needs revising. MF/HF DSC for emergencies is nice because it calls other ships directly.

Inmarsat could be useful but they should make the nav areas smaller. The GOM doesn’t need ice reports for the north Atlantic. Also, make the weather forecasts optional since most ships have internet and can just check the weather online.

I like the possibility of long range radio contact if the sat phone goes out. Same for Inmarsat email.

      • Updated - - -

[QUOTE=LNG Gemini;163979]I have taught GMDSS and I tell the students the alarms are annoying but you have to understand the false distress alerts are sent by people. When ROs were on the ships I never heard a false distress SOS.[/QUOTE]

I don’t think anyone in this thread has complained about false distress signals. The GMDSS alarms go off constantly for routine shit, like weather forecasts, ice warnings 40° of latitude north of you, adrift vessels on the other side of the ocean, etc.

Go read more carefully everything people have been complaining about because you don’t seem to understand.


#59

I was just thinking about this. For anyone interested the Summer '15 edition of CG Proceedings is themed, “21st Century Waterways”. Article on pg. 39 didn’t go into much detail, but hinted on upgrades/modernization to GMDSS. I was curious as to what might change. Advances in AIS? Integrated satellite technology to get a better picture of what assets are around you in case of distress? I thought maybe an integrated ECDIS/AIS/Inmarsat display, so you can look up a coast station/mobile station quicker and send messages. Getting rid of NBDP or integrating that function with other types of equipment? Thought it was interesting anyway.

http://uscgproceedings.epubxp.com/t/11313-proceedings-of-the-marine


#60

Can anyone tell me approximately how long it usually takes to get your FCC Radio Operator License (or whatever it’s called) from the time the school mails it off to the FCC. I just finished the GMDSS class and I was disgusted that I was required to waste so much time, money and effort memorizing that sh**t.

Thanx!