Drillship fishing

Hey guys pretty new to the forum but I’ve been working at sea for a few years at this point on a couple oil tankers and sea going vessels, Im going to be changing career path slightly and start working on a drill ship. This post may be obvious for a lot of guys - I just don’t know the climate of the work environment on these ships.

Does anybody do any fishing on these ships?? (or is it against policy) I know that the fishery is unbelievable in the gulf of mexico and people pay top dollar to do a charter.

Chances are the company has some policy against it for liability reasons. But let me know - as I would love to set the hook on a yellowfin out there.

Thanks,
Just another disgruntled seafarer

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Leave your rods at home.

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My policy albeit on different types of ships is to let you have at it but if you leave fish blood or guts on my deck, your fishing permit is revoked.

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Really depends on the company and the operator. When I started it was allowed, banned by company policy briefly a few years later, then allowed again. The good oil companies would pay for the fishing license. The good captains would buy the vacuum sealer and deep freezer.

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Since the Drillships in the GoM are all foreign flag fishing would be against the law.
They operate inside the US EEZ and no foreign fishing is allowed.

PS> Even if you are NOT within the US EEZ the company probably prohibit fishing from any Drilling rig since hooks may get stuck on the BOP or control hoses, representing a danger to divers.

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You must be a blast at parties…

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Thanks!!!

100% not true, but thanks for commenting.

This American in American waters on an American permit using an American fishing license had no issues on every foreign flag drillship I’ve ever been on in the GOM.

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Sweet guys, thanks for the responses! I’ve fished on all the ships i’ve worked on - but ill keep my gear at home this next hitch.

Stay safe on the waters.

Don’t give up. Bring fresh fish to the cook to prepare and serve to the crew. They’ll appreciate it.

Done it plenty of times man. Would gladly do it again - but not in the mood to get terminated over putting a line in the water (new vessel). Work first, play second. Thanks for the comments.

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When you arrive you’ll be given a lengthy orientation in the helo meeting room. If the amount of newcomers are small, you’ll get the new arrival meeting in a smaller room near by. At the end of the meeting, the safety officer, company rep or person-on-board coordinator will ask if there’s any questions. Ask any fishing questions at this time to give everyone a good laugh & let everyone know how green you are. It will be a hoot. Seriously, just casually ask, “Where’s the best fishing spot on board” & you’ll lighten the mood for any other newbies. Good luck & congratulations on the new adventure.

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I guess rigs are a world unto themselves.

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Every rig/drillship is different & the only way to know what bait is best for the current location is to ask during orientation. The steward depts have nearly unlimited budgets & must cook in industrial settings for hundreds of people several meals a day but love it when someone brings in 3 or 4 snappers fresh off the bottom of the drill site to throw on the line in a tiny try that wouldn’t last 2 minutes & might get people sick.

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I can’t speak for foreign vessels. We nailed anything and everything that was out there,using heavy nylon “kite” line, inner tubes and or bungee to take the shock off our hook pulling out when they hit. Guys rigged big mono up and fairly large hooks with the lures the last 50-75’ we bought lures and hooks from the various tackle shops in Lauderdale .Miami. and other assorted shops along the coasts we served. The two cranes were our outriggers with a heavy ball that helped with observing from the bridge when they hit… Outboard stern bits on the barge gave us a nice spread while pushing… Towing, the bits on the stern caught fish. We dragged them on top untill they were tired, then pulled them by hand as they skipped on the top. The crew that kept the grass off the hooks did much better than the crews that didn’t. Love and miss that part of it. The crew was happy for the distraction and fresh fish. Never used a fishing pole.Took the engines out of gear due to wheel wash, but never lost too much way.

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Fishing license?!?!? What, DEP is coming 300 miles offshore to check your paperwork??

Just ask around on the rig. There’s company policy, and then there’s “company policy.”

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No shit 3M. Agree, who looks that far offshore?

They don’t have to, Ive had them meet the crew change chopper at the heliport for bag checks. As long as the installation name, operator, and license number was on the the fish you were good to go.

Who brings it home?? Every fish I’ve ever seen caught was instantly dinner.

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We were catching 100+ pound tuna and mahi regularly, and the galley wouldn’t cook it as mentioned by someone else for safety reasons.

We might sear up a little fresh cut in the welding shop but otherwise guys would filet it, freeze it, and fly home with 10-20 lbs per hitch.

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