Did somebody lose their ROV?

It just washed up on the beach here in Fort Walton…

http://www.nwfdailynews.com/local/mysteries-of-the-deep-high-tech-submersible-salvaged-photos-1.360708?tc=cr

[B]Mysteries of the deep? High-tech ‘submersible’ salvaged (PHOTOS)[/B]

[I]By Wendy Victora[/I]
[I]Published: Monday, August 18, 2014 at 19:09 PM.[/I]

After 45 years in the marina business, Jim Tucker thought he had seen it all.

Monday, he was proven wrong when a barge delivered what Tucker called a “submersible,” which had apparently been salvaged from the Gulf of Mexico.
The men who found it and had it brought to the Boat Marina declined to speak to the Daily News, saying that their lawyer had advised against it.
Tucker didn’t share their reservations. It was on his property for several hours Monday and his employees helped hoist it from the barge to land and onto the truck that hauled it away.
“We’ve had boats, dead bodies, cocaine and marijuana — what hasn’t washed up on our beaches?” Tucker said. “Everything. But nothing like a submersible.
“That is one bunch of smart dudes that builds those things,” he said.

The piece of equipment is a product of Canyon, “a Helix Energy Solutions Company” and markings indicate it is a ROV (remotely operated vehicle) apparently armed with UHD (ultra high definition) 65 cameras.
Such equipment is used by offshore energy companies, among others.

Tucker wasn’t sure why the men that brought it in didn’t want to share the news of their big find. As far as he’s concerned, they did all the right things and have a legitimate salvage claim on it.
Petty Officer Mike Forbes with the U.S. Coast Guard said his agency had responded to a call about a “partially submerged” floating “barge” on Wednesday, Aug. 13.
The Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office called it in, after a deputy on beach patrol spotted it about one mile east of Beasley Park, according to the OCSO call history record.
Members of the county’s beach patrol unit had paddled out to see if they could identify it.

“We went out there,” Forbes said. “We couldn’t get a great look at it. It was in too shallow of water for us to get our boats in.”
He said the boat crew couldn’t identify the object either.

Since no one appeared to be in distress and the Coast Guard does not do commercial salvage, they did not take any further action, Forbes said.

Dammit. Yes. I’ve been looking all over for that thing.

Cha Ching!

It sounds like the marina crew doesn’t know how salvage law actually works and that it can get a lot more complicated for them.

[QUOTE=LI_Domer;142600]It sounds like the marina crew doesn’t know how salvage law actually works and that it can get a lot more complicated for them.[/QUOTE]

Maybe they understand exactly how salvage law works, and that the ROV might be worth a lot more than any salvage award they stand to get. But yes, collecting an award could be time-consuming and complicated.

There is no such thing as “finders keepers” in salvage. The amount of a salvage award varies, and will be determined by:

  1. Time and labor expended by the salvors in rendering the salvage service;

  2. Promptitude, skill and energy displayed in rendering the service and saving the property;

  3. Value of the property risked or employed by the salvor, and the degree of danger to which this property was exposed;

  4. Value of the property salved; and,

  5. Degree of danger from which lives and property are rescued.

See [I]The Blackwall[/I], 77 U.S. 1 (1869)

Apart from #4, I doubt finding something on the beach scores very highly for any of the salvage award criteria noted above.

[QUOTE=LI_Domer;142600]It sounds like the marina crew doesn’t know how salvage law actually works and that it can get a lot more complicated for them.[/QUOTE]

The marina guys did not salvage the ROV - they only hauled it out. Whoever “salvaged” it is not talking and now it’s gone from the marina. Maybe the parts will bring more $$ on ebay…

      • Updated - - -

I’ve never really looked at the rules in depth but find the below list interesting. No wonder the SeaTow/Boat US guys make such a big deal about towing a boat when it’s rougher then a chop since they certainly don’t hit #2 100%.

[QUOTE=jdcavo;142602]Maybe they understand exactly how salvage law works, and that the ROV might be worth a lot more than any salvage award they stand to get. But yes, collecting an award could be time-consuming and complicated.

There is no such thing as “finders keepers” in salvage. The amount of a salvage award varies, and will be determined by:

  1. Time and labor expended by the salvors in rendering the salvage service;

  2. Promptitude, skill and energy displayed in rendering the service and saving the property;

  3. Value of the property risked or employed by the salvor, and the degree of danger to which this property was exposed;

  4. Value of the property salved; and,

  5. Degree of danger from which lives and property are rescued.

See [I]The Blackwall[/I], 77 U.S. 1 (1869)

Apart from #4, I doubt finding something on the beach scores very highly for any of the salvage award criteria noted above.[/QUOTE]