ChatGPT

I would have to imagine that one that can also generate a bibliography wouldn’t be too much of a leap at this point.

Yes, the Chinese Room argument is not holding up very well. But it was first made 40 years ago. I do think it’s useful to some degree to understand how GPT can hallucinate.

When using GPT it’s easy to forgot it’s not a person. Often it does better than many of the replies here.

I’ve found GPT to be pretty decent in summarizing the CFRs with reasonable accuracy, but when it comes to COLREGS, I think our jobs are safe for now. After a few attempts, it still sounds like a freshman cadet bullshitting a homework assignment.

Rule 24 of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) and Rule 24 of the Inland Navigation Rules found in 33 CFR Part 83.24 both concern the use of sound signals to indicate a vessel’s intentions or actions, but there are some key differences between the two.

Rule 24 of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) states that a vessel must use sound signals to indicate its intentions or actions in situations where visibility is restricted and the risk of collision is increased. It specifies the types of signals that must be used, such as a prolonged blast to indicate that a vessel is altering its course to starboard, and the situations in which they must be used. It applies to all vessels on the high seas and in coastal waters.

On the other hand, Rule 24 of the Inland Navigation Rules found in 33 CFR Part 83.24 applies specifically to vessels operating on the inland waters of the United States and it also requires the use of sound signals to indicate a vessel’s intentions or actions. However, it includes additional requirements such as the use of a rapid-fire whistle signal (at least four short blasts) to indicate that a vessel is backing and the use of a bell signal to indicate that a vessel is at anchor. It also applies to all vessels operating on the inland waters of the United States including commercial and recreational vessels.

In summary, the main difference between Rule 24 of the International Collision Regulations and Rule 24 of the US Inland Navigation rules found in 33 CFR Part 83.24 is that the latter applies specifically to vessels operating on the inland waters of the United States and includes additional requirements for the use of sound signals in certain situations, such as when a vessel is backing or at anchor.

I find it interesting that every time I try and compare inland and international rules, It picks a different rule to compare with varying degrees of success.

It’s comforting to know the final barrier against enslavement by machines will be COLREGS

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One the one hand …

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-023-00107-z

and on the other …

Cheers,

Earl

Sometimes I think Ombugge might be an AI chatbot programmed to post lots of news stories

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GPT is good for summarizing books and recommending similar ones:

List some books with a theme similar to “Future Shock” but more recent.

  1. “The Fourth Industrial Revolution” by Klaus Schwab
  2. “The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future” by Kevin Kelly
  3. “The Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future” by Martin Ford
  4. “Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think” by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler
  5. “The End of Alchemy: Money, Banking, and the Future of the Global Economy” by Mervyn King
  6. “The Future of Humanity” by Michio Kaku
  7. “The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies” by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee
  8. “The Singularity Trap: Surviving and Thriving in a Smarter, Richer, and More Dangerous World” by Federico Pistono.
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An explanation as to why GPT hallucinates: - A good thread to read to understand how Large Language Models like GPTs work.

Using GPT efficiently requires using a “well engineered prompt.”

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