Changing Industry

Is it just me or does it seem like being rewarded for hard work and loyalty is a thing of the past. Can’t help
but notice things changing from being rewarded for your hard work, loyalty and dedication to being rewarded for
kissing ass and brown nosing office personnel. I have never been one to get involved with office personnel unless it was absolutely necessary for me to do so. Always done my job with the greatest intent and care. Always been on time for watch and crew change. Always done what I was told. Always went above and beyond the expectations. Worked hard with my mouth shut and head down. Never been in trouble with write ups and such. Always kept good relations with fellow crewmembers with the exception of a few who were impossible to deal with during my 15 year career. And it seems to do no good. The only way to get noticed in today’s world
is by either being a complete fuck up or breaking out the knee pads. I refuse to do either. Just wish people would
notice the guys out there doing the right thing. And to all the guys out there who think like I do. Just want to let you know your not alone. Your a dying breed and will be missed once you are gone. You are the guys that all the mariners will look up to and respect. Keep on keeping on. And god bless.

[QUOTE=NeedleGunNazi;162293]Is it just me or does it seem like being rewarded for hard work and loyalty is a thing of the past. Can’t help
but notice things changing from being rewarded for your hard work, loyalty and dedication to being rewarded for
kissing ass and brown nosing office personnel. I have never been one to get involved with office personnel unless it was absolutely necessary for me to do so. Always done my job with the greatest intent and care. Always been on time for watch and crew change. Always done what I was told. Always went above and beyond the expectations. Worked hard with my mouth shut and head down. Never been in trouble with write ups and such. Always kept good relations with fellow crewmembers with the exception of a few who were impossible to deal with during my 15 year career. And it seems to do no good. The only way to get noticed in today’s world
is by either being a complete fuck up or breaking out the knee pads. I refuse to do either. Just wish people would
notice the guys out there doing the right thing. And to all the guys out there who think like I do. Just want to let you know your not alone. Your a dying breed and will be missed once you are gone. You are the guys that all the mariners will look up to and respect. Keep on keeping on. And god bless.[/QUOTE]

and God Bless you sir…I too have experienced exactly the same decline in work ethic and increase in political backstabbing in my 35 years. It is getting downright painful to have to work with many of these purely selfserving people who all seem to have started right about the time the offshore started its meteoric rise. Men like you and I are all indeed a dying breed…those of us who remain working on vessels for the love of the craft and not the big bucks to be made.

Sounds like someone needs to join a union it’s the only way you’ll ever be respected. Included in union dues you get your respect and self esteem back. Oh and I work on offshore support vessels for love of the craft and the big bucks.

The back stabbing and the ass-kissing seems to work in the short-term. However, most people eventually get what is coming to them. The back stabber or ass kisser will someday run into someone who sees right through the bullshirt and calls it out. You may not see it in 15 years, it may take 20 or 25 but sooner or later what comes around goes around. It is really amusing see the guy who has been cruising along for years being a douche suddenly have his whole world come crashing down.

Nah! it’s always been that way. If you’ve been able to avoid it for 15 years, you’re darn lucky. There have always needle noses around who have their snout firmly planted in the boss’s pooper chute. If things are bad and people are facing job loss, those needle noses are going to do everything in their power to make sure you go before they do.are bad and people are facing job loss, those needle noses are going to do everything in their power to make sure you go before they do.

It doesn’t matter where you work, what you do, or anything else. You get a new boss who decides he doesn’t like you, for no reason. The bosses at your employer change over. All sorts of stuff.

Generally, you’re safest with small companies, where you interact directly with the management. The down side of that is that those companies often don’t have the resources to pay as much, or offer the benefits that big outfits do.

[QUOTE=Rich Bogad;162300]Generally, you’re safest with small companies, where you interact directly with the management. The down side of that is that those companies often don’t have the resources to pay as much, or offer the benefits that big outfits do.[/QUOTE]

Are you kidding? Crowley is massive and is both one of the most political environments to work in and is also one of the lowest paying. How do they get mariners to work in such world?

[QUOTE=c.captain;162305]Are you kidding? Crowley is massive and is both one of the most political environments to work in and is also one of the lowest paying. How do they get mariners to work in such world?[/QUOTE]

Isn’t it rather foolish to select one company and then use that as if it represents an entire industry?

Sir you have just described all of my Mariners. These men and women are true professionals who take their jobs serious as they are at the pinnacle of the industry. All of them working on state of the art Large OSV’s gladly training the next generation of Mariners. My company is a true meritocracy and we pride ourselves on promoting from within. We have produced some of the finest Master’s of Large OSV you will find in the entire maritime industry.

What’s that smell…hmmm…oh yeah sarcasm at its finest!

When an industry’s job market crashes as hard as financial services has recently, top recruiters see a flood of applications from people eager to get out of a tight market and apply their skills in another.

It’s a good tactic, and one that can enrich and extend your career, according to some veteran industry switchers. Switching industries tends to be easier for more junior people, career experts told TheLadders, and smoother for those who have moved from one industry to another throughout their careers than for those who have worked in only one market.

But it is doable, even for senior executives with a long history in one industry and even in a market in which employers are demanding very specific sets of skills, according to Robert Hawthorne, president of Hawthorne Executive Search, a member of TheLadders’ community of recruiters.

About a quarter to a third of the placements in which Hawthorne is involved will entail a client hiring someone who has little or no experience in the hiring manager’s industry for an executive slot, Hawthorne said.

“I call it the best-athlete scenario,” he said. “If you get a real star, someone with a legacy of accomplishment, who has a passion for what they do, I’ll tell a company they should interview this person anyway.”

“We have seen a lot of career changing over the past 18 months,” according to Michael Neece, chief strategy officer of PongoResume, an automated resume-writing service, and InterviewMastery.com, a job-interview training site. “Upwards of 27 percent of our clients are either changing industries or coming back into the workforce after time away.”


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[QUOTE=Jeaux Bawss;162315]Sir you have just described all of my Mariners. These men and women are true professionals who take their jobs serious as they are at the pinnacle of the industry. All of them working on state of the art Large OSV’s gladly training the next generation of Mariners. My company is a true meritocracy and we pride ourselves on promoting from within. We have produced some of the finest Master’s of Large OSV you will find in the entire maritime industry.[/QUOTE]
I notice this in SE Asia now, the guys retiring who had absolutley No Fn Clue ( PC illiterate) have trained a new batch ( iphone only)

It’s not who you know, it’s who you blow. I’m running into the same thing, plenty of masters giving me recommendation letters for my own boat, telling the office I’m ready, but yet some 25 year old kid is capable of running master on a new, large OSV.

I blame human resource for the current situation in the marine industry. Companies used to take an older captain or engineer and stick them hiring the people aboard the vessels and promoting them. Now some talking head with a degree in management ( Been on a cruise ship on vacation) with no sea time is making the decisions. Salt is what made this industry not some puke who likes a well written resume.