Books in your library


#21

I don’t have a copy onboard with me but I recall Duttons covering some of the more advanced (and basic) celestial problems with greater scope and clarity than Bowditch. (circles of equal altitude, ex-meridian sights, etc)


#22

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;115187]I mean things like back sights and ex meridians of the sun. You can’t even figure out what exactly an ex meridian is from Bowditch, let alone how to do one.[/QUOTE]

Dutton’s explanations are a little bit easier to understand, it’s a good book.

Noon sights are nice because you get a latitude and the computation is very easy.

An ex meridian is when you want a LAN (meridian passage) but miss taking a sight at exactly apparent noon by a few minutes (ex meridian passage) because of clouds or whatever, you enter the tables and apply a correction to your sight to make it a LAN.

An ex-meridian has a couple more steps then a straight noon sight but easier then reducing a non-LAN sight.

If you get hung up anywhere put up a post here somewhere.


#23

I was able to figure it out by Google via satellite, but I’d still like a thorough book on the theory, not just a textbook on basics.

Has anyone read Celestial Navigation in the GPS Age by John Karl


#24

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;115199]I was able to figure it out by Google via satellite, but I’d still like a thorough book on the theory, not just a textbook on basics.

Has anyone read Celestial Navigation in the GPS Age by John Karl[/QUOTE]

I read that book two years ago before I had ever taken a sight or a celestial class. I found it to be an alright book. If your looking for a Celestial book get Crawfords. They come up on ebay or Amazon every now and then and it is an excellent book.


#25

Theres a manual or book out there from a captain that used to teach C-nav in the 90s at TAMUG.

I dont know his name, but I know he used to be a KP. Legend says that the guy was so smart that to avoid people copying fron him he used to write everything in Latin.

Last name was something like Bouergouis or something like that.

I used his manual to pass all my c-nav. In my opinion the best info out there and cheap.


#26

[QUOTE=MFOWelectrician;115171]How to Win Friends.

I second that. It’s the greatest book I’ve ever read. I would encourage anyone to read it. When it was first recommended to me I was offended, like I never had any friends! But in retrospect, it was one of the best things that ever happened to me. I’ve read it 3 times since then.[/QUOTE]

It’s helped a lot of people, it turned Charles Manson from “a low-level pimp” to the “frighteningly effective sociopath”

The article is here;Charles Manson’s tuning point.


#27

Kind of freaky. Thanks for sharing.


#28

[QUOTE=MFOWelectrician;115287]Kind of freaky. Thanks for sharing.[/QUOTE]

The key word is “effective” - we all have things we want to get done. The Germans had to work as a team to conquer France in WW II.


#29

[QUOTE=“john;114207”]My new favorite book by far - which is saying a lot considering I wrote one of them :wink: - is “the tankship tromedy” by jack devanney!!

It’s out of print but the pdf version is available for free from Jack’s website: http://www.c4tx.org/ctx/pub/tromedy2.pdf[/QUOTE]

Excellent book, highly recommended.


#30

If you read “The Captain” by Jaan da hartog… you must have read the sequel “The Commodore”.

“Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors”, “Serpents Coil”, “The Old Man and the Sea”, “Sea wolf”, “Ship of Gold”, “Dead Men Tapping”, “Voyage”, & “Until the sea shall free them” are all great reads!


#31

I’d have to agree, really breaks down class etc. it does however approve of the coulombe egg, which I know we all hate. One of the better things I have read in a while as far as technical crap goes.


#32

Just read “on seas of glory”… another great read!


#33

I don’t know how I missed this thread before. I’ve got just about all the Patrick O’Brien series about Jack Aubrey and Stephen Mathurin. Plus a cookbook done by a couple of ladies who were big fans of the series and decided to historically research what exactly went into making “drowned baby”, spotted dick", “lobsouse”. and of course, “soused hog’s face”. Yum!
Another nautical author that I have just about everything by would be Joseph Conrad. I periodically reread them and gain something from them as well. I wish I could find a copy of Steaming to Bamboola. That was a great read. Also someone mentioned “Grey Seas Under” by Farley Mowatt. Very exciting.
When it comes to textbooks, no deck library is complete without Formulae for the Mariner, a two volume edition of Bowditch and a Dutton’s, American Merchant Seaman Manual and American Officer’s manual. I also have a classic (circa 1950?) Knights Modern Seamanship.


#34

[QUOTE=seadog6608;125483]I don’t know how I missed this thread before. I’ve got just about all the Patrick O’Brien series about Jack Aubrey and Stephen Mathurin. Plus a cookbook done by a couple of ladies who were big fans of the series and decided to historically research what exactly went into making “drowned baby”, spotted dick", “lobsouse”. and of course, “soused hog’s face”. Yum!
Another nautical author that I have just about everything by would be Joseph Conrad. I periodically reread them and gain something from them as well. I wish I could find a copy of Steaming to Bamboola. That was a great read. Also someone mentioned “Grey Seas Under” by Farley Mowatt. Very exciting.
When it comes to textbooks, no deck library is complete without Formulae for the Mariner, a two volume edition of Bowditch and a Dutton’s, American Merchant Seaman Manual and American Officer’s manual. I also have a classic (circa 1950?) Knights Modern Seamanship.[/QUOTE]

Chris Buckley’s Bamboola long out of print but pick one up here,

Which I did when I lost the copy I lifted from my brother. In my opinion this book would’ve made a better and much more realistic movie than Capt Phillips.


#35

Until the sea shall set them free by Robert frump


#36

I just started The Fall of Berlin 1945 by Antony Beevor.

I’ve read a lot of books on WWII, but this one is a chilling account of the last days of the Third Reich.


#37

Lord Jim by Conrad. And in the heart of the sea by Nathaniel Philbrick. Favorite fiction and non fiction so far. Primer of towing by George Reid is the most practically useful for me at this time as far as manuals or strictly informative type publications.


#38

Don’t forget any of the Colin Glencannon stories by Guy Kilpatrick. Classic stuff.


#39

[QUOTE=0rion;115206]Theres a manual or book out there from a captain that used to teach C-nav in the 90s at TAMUG.

I dont know his name, but I know he used to be a KP. Legend says that the guy was so smart that to avoid people copying fron him he used to write everything in Latin.

Last name was something like Bouergouis or something like that.

I used his manual to pass all my c-nav. In my opinion the best info out there and cheap.[/QUOTE]

Jaime Bourgeois! When he retired from teaching, he went back to sea with MSC for a while as 2/O. I think he was in his early 70’s! It was a pleasure to watch him work out morning or evening stars. True pinwheels!


#40

[I]Seaspray and Whiskey[/I] by Norman Freeman is a great read.

Whenever someone expresses an interest in obtaining a deck license to me, I have 4 books I recommend; [I]Celestial Navigation in a Nutshell[I] by Hewitt Schlereth, [I]Mariner’s Celestial Navigation[I] by William P Crawford, [I]Piloting and Dead Reckoning[I] by H H Shufeldt and [I]Navigation Rules: International - Inland[I] USCG.[/I][/I][/I][/I][/I][/I][/I][/I]