Maybe we can go on the other tack here

[QUOTE=c.captain;60851]Hey KP be a shipmate and make it offical by hittin the thanks button…I’m working at pumpin up my numbers here ;-)[/QUOTE]Already done

[QUOTE=c.captain;60851]1. be phyically fit (or at least reasonable healthy). I don’t want to have to pull your ass to a lifeboat station if you have a coronary as soon as the bells start ringin.

  1. have courage (or at least not be a panicer). I want you to be able to not freeze in an emergency or worse start screaming[/QUOTE]

Two more good ones. I don’t care if you want to panic, just save it for later when we are all safely ashore again. I’ve seen a Capt on another boat with my old Company who was so large and out of shape that he could barely get up and down the steps to the upper wheelhouse and he couldn’t fit in the wheelhouse chair. He had to sit in the settee instead. No one could figure out how he passed his USCG physical. Best guess was that he, or his wife, was paying off his doctor. To make a short story long, everyone agreed that he was going down with the ship since no one could possibly move him if he was unconscious.

[QUOTE=KPEngineer;60858]Two more good ones. I don’t care if you want to panic, just save it for later when we are all safely ashore again. I’ve seen a Capt on another boat with my old Company who was so large and out of shape that he could barely get up and down the steps to the upper wheelhouse and he couldn’t fit in the wheelhouse chair. He had to sit in the settee instead. No one could figure out how he passed his USCG physical. Best guess was that he, or his wife, was paying off his doctor. To make a short story long, everyone agreed that he was going down with the ship since no one could possibly move him if he was unconscious.[/QUOTE]

Interesting!
I was First on a LASH vessel (when the First was a day worker), got a call from the the Second at 0430, seems his Oiler didn’t show-up for watch (we were at sea). The Second sent the the 00-04 Oiler up to see what was going-on and reported back that the door was locked and no response to knocks on the door. I had keys in my office so I got the right key, knocked on the door, no response, opened the door and found the Oiler we called “Tiny” on the floor, naked and dead. I called the Captain, Chief, and Chief Mate. We four could barely move poor Tiny, he was about 6 and a half feet tall, he had to weight in at over 400 pounds. How in the world was this seaman allowed to sail? A work party was gathered and with great effort we were able to move Tiny to a reefer, Bos’n fabricated a canvas covering. Messages were sent.
Sad, but it happens.