USS Fitzgerald collides with ACX Crystal off coast of Japan


#588

I think someone is off his meds … that Cost Concordia post cinches it.


#589

Au contraire, appreciate your explanation, sketches and clear demonstration of most probable sequence - in terms of the resulting damage that is. Thank you.

Looks like one hell of an impact. The plating fwd (and apparently aft as well) of the patch appears displaced inward from the next forward frame as well. Witness the contoured webs on the strongbacks.


#590

Keep in mind I only said “closer to 90°” (than your assumed 45°). Do you think that outcome would still be the same at 65-70°?


#591

What do you mean when you keep saying “crop”? Do you think they cut out damage to put that patch on? They very obviously just took a rectangular piece of steel, reinforced it with beams, and welded it into the hull over the hole.


#592

Nah dude its clearly a conspiracy!


#593

This is like listening to brietbart.

Next thing we know he’ll claim the GPS was hacked on the crystal and some black hat hacker steered it into the Fitzgerald.


#594

Crop is used when discussing ship steel repairs. It means to cut away damaged or corroded steel back to sound, undamaged material, so that you can insert pieces of original thickness to restore the original structure. I have done it many times. Such jobs cannot be left to the Master or the Chief Engineer to carry out … they are not trained for it … and such jobs are not done underwater.

The reinforcements of hull plates are called frames, stiffeners, beams, etc, and are fitted on the inside.

The job shown on the photo looks like a Mickey Mouse job.


#595

No. The job was a temporary patch to stabilize the vessel and pump water out of damaged spaces so it could safely enter dry-dock.


#596

Then obviously this doesn’t qualify as such because it WAS done underwater.

No duh dumbfuck, this was a temp job to get it into drydock for real repairs. How dense are you?


#597

Micky Mouse is a stud to get it done as quick as he did.


#598

Easy - MM had help from Donald Duck and Sponge Bob SquarePatch! :laughing:


#599

When I was in the Navy, I learnt how to stop hull leakages from the inside with water flowing in through a leakage (due to enemy fire).

That knowledge has come in handy later as also merchant marine vessels are subject to leaks. I was pretty good at making cement boxes and similar devices during my long career in ship operations and repairs.

However cropping away hull plates under water and then fitting a big, heavy patch and beams over the hole, I never did. That patch must have weighed >1 000 kgs and could only have been handled using a crane.

Anyway, it would have been nice to see a photo of the damages before the patch was fitted.


#602

Right…“small” hull contact.

Running into a rock pinnacle and having a 80 tons of it wind up lodged in your hull sure is a minor inconvenience.

I don’t post here often, but this is the most asinine thing I’ve read in this forum. Not only was her tow to Genoa, partial scrapping while still afloat and subsequent move to drydock heavily covered on THIS VERY WEBSITE, but just YESTERDAY there was an article covering the completion of the scrapping.

Just stop. You clearly have zero idea what you are talking about.


#603

Careful what you say, the same poster has posted some other things that take the cake (you know, like Schettino does not deserve the 16 years he got, little gems like that) and others of a more competitive bent may try and outdo the post.


#604

From the end of last month. I highlighted a few points.


"USS Fitzgerald is preparing to enter drydock on Fleet Activities Yokosuka early next month to conduct follow on inspections and repairs,” Doss said. “An ammo offload was completed June 25. Additional preparations include dewatering, defueling and temporary patch installation on the hull. Once the ship is docked, technical assessments will commence that will inform options to conduct long term repairs in the United States.”

Yeah, I’m really glad they took the time to do the job right.


#605

Sorry, I know what I am talking about. Only criminal, irresponsible shipowners blame their employed officers and crew members for incidents at sea, which are always stupid accidents. Shore based administrations and authorities are happy to assist.

I describe the Costa Concordia incident in detail at http://heiwaco.com/news8.htm and why the not seaworthy ship sank.

Regarding the disappearance of the wreck and all its toxic waste I describe it at http://heiwaco.com.news811.htm

There is no evidence that the 17 000 tons light ship wreck was cut up in drydock February-May 2017.and disposed of for recycling. I think it was simply towed out to sea again and sunk.

But if you can show me some photos of the wreck in drydock March and April 2017 I am happy to see them. It also applies to Fitz in DD July 2017.

But why not scrap the ship or, simpler, just tow it out to sea and sink it? A ship that is completely destroyed by a little 14x17’ hole in the side below waterline upflooding three (?) compartments, destroying the machinery, communications equipment and crew accommodation cannot be worth repairing.


#606

Sorry, to me it does not sound like you know what your ranting about. Now, I will agree that there are serious issues in many companies on the shoreside part, but that does not excuse what the captain did. Yes, some of the shoreside management should probably be flogged to allow a company culture with Schettino as a captain. No, it still does not remove his responsibility.

[quote=“Heiwa, post:605, topic:45129”]
A ship that is completely destroyed by a little 14x17’ hole in the side below waterline upflooding three (?) compartments, destroying the machinery, communications equipment and crew accommodation cannot be worth repairing.
[/quote] It was not completely destroyed. It was major damage that could have sank the ship had the crew not reacted well at that point. I would hope people here, even if critical about the watchstanders allowing themselves to be struck by a container ship to consider that the follow-up efforts were certainly admirable. There can be plenty worth repairing, for old times sake research just how many major ships actually sunk at Pearl Harbor ended up fighting another day.


#607

I wonder if those clown is making any money off ad traffic from his certain uptick in site visits for posting his delusions of grandeur and conspiracy theories.


#608

Mr. Robot?


#609

Come on. This is Max Turdberger. Fess up!