Why so many Chief Mates quitting MSC?


#14

[QUOTE=LauHalaLana;91278]Just got a note from an MSC Chief Mate who was finally relieved 114 days AFTER their due date. Any wonder why they are leaving in droves? Perhaps if MSC sent all of their shoreside personnel with licenses out as relief mates/engineers they could slow the hemmorhage.[/QUOTE]

Bet THAT was popular. Exactly why I quit years ago.


#15

[QUOTE=Xmsccapt(ret);92421]Don’t kid yourself. None of the bozos in the officer have licenses. Oh sure, the port officers do, like PC and PE, but they are going back anyway. Taylor " was" a third engineer, McKenna is a retired USN 06 nothing and never had a license. I doubt any of the class managers maintained a license and if they did they had zero experience. [/QUOTE]

MSC requires the DCOs to maintain current licenses. They are in general a burden on the system, and should be sent back to sea for a couple of months every year. And I wonder which PC/PE you know that willingly go back to sea. I can think of a number of them who have successfully avoided sea duty for several years.


#16

All true, DCO’s do maintain a license, but seldom do they use it except to upgrade when sea time is needed. While a few C/E and "special assistants " with a masters license were able to spent years in the office the majority of them go back to sea after a two - three year shoreside tour. Even if you could get all the shore side to sea that possesses a current license it would be a drop in the bucket and not make much difference anyway. Not when you are 18 chief mates short. A novel idea would be to treat the employees better in the first place…


#17

[QUOTE=PDCMATE;91499]Noble will hire anyone with a license and throw them into a position they are not qualified to do! I am sure some of them are great sailors and understand ship operations, but to go from a Chief Mate at MSC to a CM on a Drillship is absurd. I personally also think it would be the same for someone from drilling to go box boat or tanker in the same capacity as a slap in the face to all that have worked in that area of expertise, just to have someone thrown in there because they have a qualification, but not the experience.[/QUOTE]

There are plenty of people at MSC that are qualified and have little experience. I road the salvage boats for a while and watched plenty of mates sign on to do [B]1[/B] tow and get their TOAR signed off. It used to piss me off to hear the young mates say they were “just checking the boxes” in their meteoric rise to MSC superstardom.


#18

A DCO relieved a Chief Mate on an east coast oiler for during Nov-Dec. Another DCO is serving on a west coast oiler right now as Chief Mate. I’ll admit there are some DCO’s who will never relieve a seagoing mariner but there aren’t that many to go around in the first place. In general I can place the blame on “the office”. As a group they care little about the well being of mariners. I’m not implying that mariners need babying but the callousness of the crewing branch is unbelieveable. I believe a few of the recent escapees will be back as soon as they find out working in the oil patch is not all its cracked up to be.


#19

True, Msc cannot manage people, never could, never has and never will. One big problem is that the office is filled with people that never went to sea for a living or if they did not for long. The office sees the sea going personnel as the enemy. More than once it’s been said by the shore staff " this would be a good job if it were not for those mariners". The gulf has changed. Once one could get by with little professional knowledge and a 200 ton license. With the larger vessels coming, DP and heading out to other shores the companies now enjoy unlimited license and are willing to pay for them. Making $800 - $1200 a day with a 28/28 routine could be a job that last an entire career. I know if this had been the case 15 - 20 years ago during my Msc career I would have been gone like a shot! Why anyone would stay with Msc these days is well beyond my comprehension.


#20

Did you know that MSC is now hiring Port Engineers right out of college with no previous sea experience? True fact. Met one recently. Not sure what the crew thought of him. He was all of 23… I guess anything to justify crappy pay…


#21

Why didn’t they quit years ago?


#22

Not sure what your asking, many did quit years ago,many of the recent departures were not chief mates years ago, years ago there were fewer opportunities in the marine field, years ago msc had better management shore side. It’s all about supply, demand, flow ebb and need. A lot of dynamics. The bottom line is that today Msc has more trouble with retention than it did years ago, smart managers would seek to find the reason why. Of course that would a useless study as nothing is ever the fault of shoreside management, or so they think.


#23

[QUOTE=Xmsccapt(ret);94080]The bottom line is that today Msc has more trouble with retention than it did years ago, smart managers would seek to find the reason why. Of course that would a useless study as nothing is ever the fault of shoreside management, or so they think.[/QUOTE]

If they even recognize that they have a retention problem, they must be SHOCKED that the prospect of someday soon wearing their silly “command at sea” pin would not be a sufficient counterbalance to being relieved four months late.


#24

I worked for MSCPAC 1981-1985. I left because 10 months at sea a year is no picnic. One second engineer I knew had 10 months on a ship (6 months was a tour back then) and asked to be set adrift in the shipping lane on a raft with 6 other shipmates who all signed the letter absolving MSC of any responsibility for their lives after that. MSC relieved all them off the carrier in the group they were in. Probably what bothered me the most at that time was the office pukes. I was looking for a 2nds job and showed the port engineer a recommendation from a chief engineer that said “Mr. ------------ did the 2nd engineers job while sailing 3rd, I need a good 2nd engineer sent him out here to me.” The port engineer told me “We don’t look at those, if you happen to be in the office and an opening comes up whoever here gets it.” I quit 4 months later and got a 30% pay raise with 6 months a year work.

The Shoreside Morons at MSC SUCKED 30 YEARS AGO AND STILL SUCK. Blowin off some built up steam.


#25

100 percent correct! Shame, as Msc could have been a decent place to work. The shore side indeed is the problem and a cancer to the well being of msc. I also agree that " too bad steam is gone". I loved those old steam ships!


#26

[QUOTE=Xmsccapt(ret);94811]100 percent correct! Shame, as Msc could have been a decent place to work. The shore side indeed is the problem and a cancer to the well being of msc. I also agree that " too bad steam is gone". I loved those old steam ships![/QUOTE]

That’s sad to read. It wasn’t like that in the 70’s or was I blind. I have wonderful memories of my time with MSTS, later to morph into MSC. One Chief Engineer, one Captain, I sailed with, was the the very best in any world. So were many of the crew. This thread is an education for me.


#27

There are good people there, lots of them as odd as that fact is its true. In fact a rather amazing fact given the way msc treats people. For that matter there are good people ashore in support functions. Management and leadership from the shoreside is what’s missing. Basically, the higher up you go ashore the worse the problem gets. Add the USN and all their baggage ( shore side and afloat) and you have a first rate cluster F&: ch . In the making.


#28

[QUOTE=Xmsccapt(ret);94826]There are good people there, lots of them as odd as that fact is its true. In fact a rather amazing fact given the way msc treats people. For that matter there are good people ashore in support functions. Management and leadership from the shoreside is what’s missing. Basically, the higher up you go ashore the worse the problem gets. Add the USN and all their baggage ( shore side and afloat) and you have a first rate cluster F&: ch . In the making.[/QUOTE]

I suppose so, but the old adage sill rules, “when the going gets tuff, the tuff get going.”


#29

Does not apply, not when you hands are tied and you don’t get backing from the shore side. That quote works well for high school football or the USMC, but not with msc. a better slogan for msc would be " you can’t fight city hall". I know many a good man that tried to change Msc for the better, all failed.


#30

How about, “If you don’t stir the pot, all of the shit will rise to the top”.


#31

Good one !


#32

[QUOTE=Xmsccapt(ret);94838]Does not apply, not when you hands are tied and you don’t get backing from the shore side. That quote works well for high school football or the USMC, but not with msc. a better slogan for msc would be " you can’t fight city hall". I know many a good man that tried to change Msc for the better, all failed.[/QUOTE]

It’s sad for me to read this. I suppose the shit has hit the fan with MSC and no one can pull the plug.


#33

Indeed, or perhaps put the plug back in?