Shell Knows what Aiviq's Captain had for Breakfast

Article from Blomeberg: Inside Shell’s Extreme Plan to Drill in the Arctic.

Not to say there will be a blowout. “It’s not going to happen on my watch,” Pickard maintains. She has hired new talent, including a retired Navy admiral and several ex-Coast Guard officers. She’s “flattened the organization a lot.” Her predecessor and his inner circle in Anchorage perched several floors above the operations people; Pickard and her aides-de-camp mingle with the rank and file.
Ninety percent of the hands-on crew on an offshore project work for contractors. Pickard acknowledges that in 2012, Shell didn’t supervise the hired help adequately. “The contract management side has entirely changed,” she says. She has designated senior Shell employees as “contract holders” who each supervise one or two outside companies to the exclusion of other duties. “I expect our contract holder to know what the captain of the [I]Aiviq[/I] had for breakfast yesterday.”

Famous last words. “Not on my watch”. Hope they are knocking wood. “Mingle with the rank and file” that doesn’t come off too arrogant. “Mingling” or “perched above” matters little in and of itself. Braggadocio is not a substitute for experience and skilled leadership. I hope for all’s sake it is just the tone the reporter took.

“She has hired new talent, including a retired Navy admiral and several ex-Coast Guard officers.”

Oh yeah … she picked them for their offshore oil field experience. Geez if that woman actually thinks, much less brags, that hiring some double dipping lobbyists, insiders and ring knockers is helping to ensure Shell doesn’t repeat its incredible display of incompetence, I think she has already failed.

How can anyone take those clowns seriously?

Steamer, you beat me to it and you said it perfectly. Ring knockers admirals and uscg cats will be spouting constantly " I must reiterate, that is not how we did things on the aircraft carrier, office or Washington,DC."

I don’t think big companies can change this fast.

Pickard acknowledges that in 2012, Shell didn’t supervise the hired help adequately. “The contract management side has entirely changed,” she says.

If Shell didn’t have it together in 2012 I doubt it has it together now. I’ve worked for a few very good companies but they’ve been good at what they do for long time. Same thing on a ship for that matter. To change the culture on a ship takes time and is very difficult.

“Shell didn’t supervise the hired help adequately” ??
Hired help? Sounds like Pickard is referring to a lower class of people. The “hired help” was vetted and hired by Shell. Did Shell not check out the expertise of the “hired help” before they hired them? Casting blame upon the lowest common denominator is the last defense of the indefensible.

Well I for one will sleep better knowing that the master’s breakfast log is being maintained to a higher standard.

They hired ex-navy and coasties? I thought they were going to hire people with maritime experience.

[QUOTE=z-drive;167107]Well I for one will sleep better knowing that the master’s breakfast log is being maintained to a higher standard.[/QUOTE]

Gotta track the important stuff. I wonder if they know what he drank last night?

Someone needs to send this thread to the moron writer at Bloomberg. The only one in the story more idiotic than that stupid woman is the writer.

[QUOTE=Steamer;167117]Someone needs to send this thread to the moron writer at Bloomberg. The only one in the story more idiotic than that stupid woman is the writer.[/QUOTE]
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There is something odd about the article. LIke KPChief said, can’t tell if the tone of the article is based on Shell’s words, the writer’s impression of Shell’s culture or just the writer being snarky.

I suppose it is possible Shell has hired the right people. Sometimes a few people in key roles can make a big difference.

I am back folks!

Anyway, I wonder if Shell monitors the bowel movements of the AIVIQ’s master? Now point knowing what he had for breakfast if you don’t know if he in constipated or not.

Since there is already a 99.9% probability that the Captain will have eggs, bacon, and a cup of coffee every morning, I would have hoped after several billion dollars they would up the ante to know what’s for lunch. I guess those odds were a little too much.

Just like with credit bureaus. If an institution can claim a valid reason, they can look at your credit record, and add to it. It the Gummit proclaims a need to see “metadata” and all of its associated branchings, there’s no reason that the Captain’s breakfast isn’t in a data bank somewhere, just gotta look harder for it. Phone, internet, what’s the difference? Didn’t stop any terror, yet. What sort of blow-out will knowing the Captains breakfast help to prevent?

This is from the same Bloomberg article.

But past failure doesn’t guarantee future failure, Pickard points out. “The perception was that the weather is far worse [in the Arctic] than anywhere else we operate,” she continues. Not so. Off the U.K., she says, “North Sea conditions are actually worse.” Before taking over in Anchorage, she oversaw the construction of Prelude, a mammoth floating liquefied natural gas plant off northwestern Australia. It’s designed to withstand Category 5 cyclones, she explains, and those don’t happen in the Arctic. [U]“We know how to operate in places where there’s challenging weather,” she says. “Alaska is no worse, and in many ways better than some other places.[/U]”

Pickard here is claming that Shell knows how to operate in places with challenging weather but this is the same organization that developed a plan to tow the Kulluk across the Gluf of Alaska in December with the surge gear comprised of a single shot of 3 in chain, and then towed into 30+ foot seas.

the prelude was\is in a shipyard I guess thats where shell people get bad weather experience?

kings point/Annapolis

It’s intresting that Pickard is saying that “to know how to operate”, in challenging weather, that is to say “knowledge” is something that is embedded in the design of the Prelude rather then somthing that the people operating it have.

He had corn flakes this morning. and 2% milk cup of coffee

[QUOTE=Louis;167531]He had corn flakes this morning. and 2% milk cup of coffee[/QUOTE]

It almost goes without saying of course but Shell presumably does not want or need to know about anyone’s diet. What was meant was that the process of monitoring the performance of the contractors was going to be so intense that they would know, they didn’t say they would care.

A vessel auditor is going to inadvertently learn many inconsequential details during an audit.