Jones act and airlines


#142

You are correct. They shut down early last year and sold it to Puglia Engineering. Evidently they let things run down prior to closing. Puglia is suing them saying they were let to believe the drydocks were ready for immediate use. In actuality they were in need of immediate repair.


#143

If you could ditch your liability for toxic waste with a little re-org magic, every dirty industry would just leave their crap in a pile out back, go bankrupt, and move over one building.


#144

It’s not “branded American”. No one claims the iPhone is “American made” (it would actually be illegal to do so).


#145

It is not stamped with “Made in USA” no, but it is widely seen as an American brand. Some see “IPhone” as synonym with “Smartphone”, although it is only one of many brands on the market.

Likewise, Xiaomi, Huawei etc. is definitely seen as Chinese brands and many assume then “low quality”, although they contain much the same components, manufactured by the same companies around the world (incl. USA) and are assemble in the same facilities as the IPhone.

You don’t hear much about “Chinese made” when Apple introduce a new product with great fanfare, like yesterday.


#146

iphone sure is popular in China


#147

So, what is the problem with that?

BMW cars are made in 5 or 6 different countries including the US and are universally seen as a German brand. That applies to probably a thousand other products and brands.


#148

I did not say that it was anything wrong, just a statement of fact. What I said was:
Vessels with hulls built in Roumania or wherever, but from Norwegian designs with Norwegian equipment and fitted out in Norway is “branded” and seen as being “Norwegian built”, just like IPhones assembled in China from parts from several countries, but designed in California (as it says on the label) is seen as an American brand, or even an American product.

What is wrong with that???


#149

Nothing, I misunderstood your comment. Please accept my apology for “shooting from the hip.”


#150

did a DP audit on a norwegian built STX DP2 PSV, how did it ever get class, oh Norwegian FMEA surveyor and Norwegian class.
I cant decide if its a Korean or Norwegian vessel?
Welding was nice, design was rubbish


#151

I’ll have to take your expert opinion on that.
Bit surprised that you find a vessel designed by STX (now VARD) to be “rubbish”. They have a good reputation and there are vessels of their design being built all over the world and for many different owners. How do they get repeat customers when they operate in an open and competitive market where Owners can go anywhere?


#152

Apple is an American brand but (almost) no one conflates that with “American built”.

Which is wrong, they aren’t Norwegian built. You can brand it as the company that designed and oversaw it but stop saying “Norwegian built”, because they’re not.


#153

So a empty hull is a ship now? Steelwork is labour intensive work that is idiotic to do in a high cost country like Norway.


#154

American shipyards just bring in Polish, Mexican, and other foreign welders.


#155

We do it in Norway also, only the shift supervisor is Norwegian in the yards. So why do it in Norway when heavy freight is dirt cheap?


#156

Politically and economically America is very different from Norway. America is a large country where less than 1% of the population has ever seen a shipyard or been aboard a ship. No one thinks maritime industries and waterbourne transportation are important. Norway is a small maritime nation where almost everyone lives within a few miles of the sea and a large percentage of the population is employed at something maritime related. Norway specializes in maritime.


#157

What was rubbish with the design? The STX designed vessels I have worked on performed excellent.

Takes rough weather with ease, and has good station keeping on DP.


#158

Just about everybody, except for a few stubborn Americans, see them as Norwegian built, so why worry.
You go ahead and pay triple to weld together hulls in US yards from foreign steel (as long as it is not bent or shaped in any manner) using imported foreign workers to do so.

The Norwegian yards will continue to design, equip and building quality ship at competitive rates for both Norwegian and foreign Owners. (Incl. Americans)

If you should need some top modern Maritime or Oil field equipment, you know where to come.


#159

The Jones Act - right now- is an epic fail except for keeping 3rd world tugboats off the Mississippi. Having the high value work done here by finishing hulls would be a BIG improvement over what happens now. IMHO


#160

For ages I believed that removing shipyards from the Jones Act equation would be a bad idea. I am beginning to see now that we have gone so far down the toilet in nearly every aspect of industry that maybe it is time to do away with that US build component, at least the hull component.

I think now that allowing any shipyard that does not have any contracts to do naval work should be permitted to purchase bare hulls from Poland or elsewhere and complete them the same way other nations do.

I believe that prohibiting naval shipyards from the business will go a long way toward financial responsibility and remove the impact of political corruption and obscene cost over-runs that seem to define our DoD focused yards.


#161

The Jones Act is among the most necessary and successful U.S. laws. Without it, there would not be any shipyards or US built vessels, not even yachts or fishing boats. Even all the yacht crew and fishermen in the US would be Indian, Filipino, Eastern European, with some Norwegians and Brits.

A few years later it would be cheaper foreign truck drivers, construction workers, and so. I just can’t wait to buy super cheap tickets to fly between New York and Seattle on Air Bumfukistan