Crew fighting on shore

Things are so pussified these days. I agree no fighting on company time…BUT…I seriously think that if there are 2 wanna be bad asses, that as soon as the hitch is over they should be taken straight to the nearest MMA or boxing gym…made to sign waivers…put in the cage/ring…handle their business…then put it in the past.

I was in the Navy and saw it all. Fights and even suicides. Usually booze was a factor in the former equation (and in the latter? A broken heart). A fight on shore is often the result of a long simmering resentment that came to a head. In a typical Navy crew of hundreds or thousands, resentments can be diffused to a certain degree because the offended parties have peers to lean on. Navy ships also carry a chaplain and others who will sit with troubled personnel and counsel them.
In a small, professional merchant crew that option is not always available. Resentments, gripes and beefs need to be dealt with as soon as they arise lest they be allowed to fester. If a relief is not available, you could end up with a loose cannon.
Men and women with a habitual inability to get along, even for the sake of the ship and the job, should be let go.
I have seen different levels of tolerance amongst the companies I have dealt with so far. I think it’s still a misunderstood subject, in this industry anyway, which is torn between modern management and age-old traditions.

[QUOTE=catherder;87945]I was in the Navy and saw it all. Fights and even suicides. Usually booze was a factor in the former equation (and in the latter? A broken heart). A fight on shore is often the result of a long simmering resentment that came to a head. In a typical Navy crew of hundreds or thousands, resentments can be diffused to a certain degree because the offended parties have peers to lean on. Navy ships also carry a chaplain and others who will sit with troubled personnel and counsel them.
In a small, professional merchant crew that option is not always available. Resentments, gripes and beefs need to be dealt with as soon as they arise lest they be allowed to fester. If a relief is not available, you could end up with a loose cannon.
Men and women with a habitual inability to get along, even for the sake of the ship and the job, should be let go.
I have seen different levels of tolerance amongst the companies I have dealt with so far. I think it’s still a misunderstood subject, in this industry anyway, which is torn between modern management and age-old traditions.[/QUOTE]

I couldn’t agree more with your post. Australia has a significantly smaller navy but the problems are consistent. It is always a challenge to overcome the problems onboard when the everyday duties usually take precedence. This is when I found the lesser known gripes to slip through the cracks and they are the ones that sometimes are the more severe.