CPR Standards - 2011

Had coast guard inspection on one of our boats last spring and during man overboard drill the coast guard informed us that the guidelines now only call for continuous chest compressions (100 per minute). However last night I got recertified at the red cross and the instructor said this was wrong, that it’s still 30:2. My question is: what would the correct answer be on a coast guard examination?

The old answer. They don’t update questions much it seems.

[QUOTE=DeckApe;55041]The old answer. They don’t update questions much it seems.[/QUOTE]

There is no way to know that with certitude, since the questions are no longer published.

[QUOTE=Alex13;55040]Had coast guard inspection on one of our boats last spring and during man overboard drill the coast guard informed us that the guidelines now only call for continuous chest compressions (100 per minute). However last night I got recertified at the red cross and the instructor said this was wrong, that it’s still 30:2. My question is: what would the correct answer be on a coast guard examination?[/QUOTE]

I don’t know what the current questions call for, but I can be very certain that you won’t get a question that has the new protocol and the recently changed protocol as possible answer choices.

I would answer with what you can document as the correct, current protocol, and if that is considered incorrect, then challenge the question and cite your authority. If the current protocol is not among the answer choices, then pick the best answer. A recently changed protocol would be the best answer.

Thank you!

[QUOTE=Alex13;55040]Had coast guard inspection on one of our boats last spring and during man overboard drill the coast guard informed us that the guidelines now only call for continuous chest compressions (100 per minute). However last night I got recertified at the red cross and the instructor said this was wrong, that it’s still 30:2. My question is: what would the correct answer be on a coast guard examination?[/QUOTE]

I had this discussion recently in the CPR/First Aid class. Not in the context of an examination but the old vs. new CPR methods being taught. The explanation that was given sounded logical… the continuous chest compressions without breaths is meant for the average joe on the street that will most likely not be trained as well, and would expect help to arrive in a shorter time than what we would face offshore, in that offshore there will be no help before everyone is exausted and you want as much benefit from your efforts as possible. This would include the breaths. Now, each and every situation is different, and you can only do what you can do, and your call within your training and experience is the right thing to do. I would also pressure everyone that works on a vessel to ask their company for a difibrillator, cause if you are suffering cardiac arrest CPR (with or without breaths) is not going to save you.

As far as the exam question… Mr. Cavo has it right in my opinion, and hopefully you will never suffer a pop quiz in the middle of the ocean cause life don’t grade on the curve.

good series of videos…utilize for safety meetings??

The new CPR protocols are for layperson CPR and is based on 1) the reality that many laypeople who are without equipment are rightfully unwilling to do mouth to mouth, 2) in a sudden cardiac arrest, there is (in a shoreside scenario where EMS response is timely) plenty of O2 still in the lungs. In drownings, hangings and other oxygen deprivation cause arrest, this O2 reserve is NOT present and must be provided.

Professional Rescuer CPR (which all mariners should be trained to) is still 30:2. Unless an AED is IMMEDIATELY available, 2 minutes of quality CPR is best to prime the heart for defibrillation, assuming the victim’s heart is in a shockable rhythm.

Unforunately, the USCG inspector, like a lot of people have been confused by the new standards.

Most tugs don’t have barriers for safely giving mouth-to-mouth either.

Our company provided cpr is regular adult cpr, not professional rescuer cpr. Last time the instructor was here the rule was no breaths. The year before that the standard had changed but they were not teaching it yet. He taught us to do 30:2 as well if we chose to but the official policy was no breaths.

IMHO tug companies (all shipping companies, actually) should equip their vessels with AEDs. Crowley and Harley have them. Others do as well, I’m sure. We have one at PMI and it has so far saved one precious life. There is no excuse in this day and age not to carry this equipment. CPR success rates are abysmal. AED success rates are amazing. http://ohsonline.com/articles/2006/12/lifesaving-success-results-in-updated-aedcpr-guidelines.aspx

Bouchard has them

Agreed. Even places on land where EMTs are near by should have them but vessels, no matter how close to land they operate, need them. It should be required.

Thank you for all the responses! We recently got AED’s on all of our boats. Definitely feel more prepared now in the event of an emergency.

[QUOTE=Alex13;55142]Thank you for all the responses! We recently got AED’s on all of our boats. Definitely feel more prepared now in the event of an emergency.[/QUOTE]

Did you also get the training that goes with them? Just curious.

[QUOTE=dougpine;55148]Did you also get the training that goes with them? Just curious.[/QUOTE]

Well, we’ve got a guy on our crew that also works as an EMT, and he went through it with us. Then we watched the “training” video that came with it. Most of us also got the AED training with our first aid training as well.

When i was on the American Integrity they had AED’s and you were instructed on use as well as Standard CPR and complete procedure…you had to pass both to be certified.

I took Med PIC at MITAGS in February and they taught 30 compressions and two breaths. Wait a while, they’ll change it again.

I took my American Heart cert for CPR Professional Rescuer and it’s 30 and 2. For the untrained layperson, just straight chest compressions.

And if you ever forget what to do, every recent model AED has a card inside which explains CPR with pictures, and what to do.