Ciudad del Carmen

I just spent a week here in a what if risk assessment with Pemex. This is one of the most boring towns I have ever been to. Can anyone offer any advice or information on things to do here for when I come back?

[QUOTE=Capt. Lee;52573]I just spent a week here in a what if risk assessment with Pemex. This is one of the most boring towns I have ever been to. Can anyone offer an advice or information on things to do here for when I come back?[/QUOTE]
It’s been the early '80s since I was there but the snook fishing was fantastic.

Is that old DC3 still abandoned at the end of the runway?? That’s a whole 'nother story!

This post sounds like a set-up. I’ll have to plead the fifth. Thar be touble to be fount thar - I promise.

[QUOTE=Tiredmariner;52591]This post sounds like a set-up. I’ll have to plead the fifth. Thar be touble to be fount thar - I promise.[/QUOTE]

Sounds like someone has a guilty conscious.

[QUOTE=injunear;52578]

Is that old DC3 still abandoned at the end of the runway?? That’s a whole 'nother story![/QUOTE]

Wow, talk about a flashback! I think I have some pics somewhere taken in the cockpit of that thing. It was a whole 'nother world there during the IXTOC blowout.

What do you know about the plane?

[QUOTE=Steamer;52604]Wow, talk about a flashback! I think I have some pics somewhere taken in the cockpit of that thing. It was a whole 'nother world there during the IXTOC blowout.

What do you know about the plane?[/QUOTE]
That plane was the last DC3 in comercial service as far as i know. I flew out of Merida to Ciudad del Carmen in the earley '80s. There were 8 cartriges expended starting one engine. In mid flight, we lost one engine. On landing, we lost the other. They sent a bus to retreive us like it happened every day. 5 years later, I was on a consulting job and the plane was still sitting at the end of the runway.

It was not that last DC3 in Commercial service as they are still flying today. If it took a cartridge to start the engine it wasn’t a DC3. I would love to see a picture of it to see what it really is.

[QUOTE=skycowboy;52614]It was not that last DC3 in Commercial service as they are still flying today. If it took a cartridge to start the engine it wasn’t a DC3. I would love to see a picture of it to see what it really is.[/QUOTE]
The stbd engine “popped” each time they tried to start it. I assumed it was cartridges. On the flight out, they “upgraded” to a Convair 240.

I’ve flown in much scarier looking equipment into various “resort” areas like Banana Zaire and Riohacha Colombia.

[QUOTE=injunear;52634]The stbd engine “popped” each time they tried to start it. I assumed it was cartridges.[/QUOTE]

If it was a cartridge starter you would have had no doubts whatsoever about it!

The direlect sitting on the field at Carmen was definitely a C-47. I’ve got pictures of it somewhere if I can rummage through the stacks from those days.

That was those Old Pratt and Whittney 1830 radial engines backfiring. When you start them you turn the engine for about 7 rotations to pre oil the engine, then you add fuel for about 7 turns and then you turn on the Magnetos which activate the spark plugs. So some times you can have a lot of gas in the cylinders when you lite the match… Those engines do everything slow. Even when it starts to come apart it will throw parts out for a long time before it finally stops turning. I was flying one up until 3 years ago and would go back to flying one again if the opportunity every presented itself again.

Alway nice to run into a taildragger pilot… great stories!

[QUOTE=skycowboy;52614]It was not that last DC3 in Commercial service as they are still flying today. If it took a cartridge to start the engine it wasn’t a DC3. I would love to see a picture of it to see what it really is.[/QUOTE]

While not a commercial service the outfit Missionary Flights International still flies a DC-3. I saw it a year or so ago, brought back memories. That DC-3 design is a classic.

What most people don;t know about the DC3 is that the control surfaces are make of fabric. If you go up to the Rudder, Elevator or Ailerons you can play them like a drum. I once flew one that had 86 thousand hours on it. That was back in the 80’s and I know it is still flying today. Thats like 16 years of non stop flying.

I spent 10 years there and could find plenty to do. However if don’t speak any Spanish about your only salvation is hang out at Pelicanos and drinking with the other people that are bored. Certainly, Playa Dorada, Tavares, Skorpions, and Jardines should get your interest up.

The bar in the Holiday Inn isn’t too bad. . . . Much better that the Lobby bar. 4th floor. Opens at 1800, I believe. Loud with music videos and/or futbol. There can be lots of locals at times.