Best Advanced Celestial Navigation Book

What is the best book that covers the more advanced celestial techniques (as opposed to a text book for beginners)? One with a good discussion of all the theory too.

Any opinions on Celestial Navigation in the GPS Age by John Karl?

A forum member recommended a website a couple of weeks ago…mmts.com (Merchant Mariner Training Services)
They have a couple of cel nav books on the site and one of them is Cel-Nav 2nd mate to Master. Hope this helps.

Mariner’s Celestial Navigation by William P. Crawfordis outstanding, but out of print.

If you can find a good deal on a copy or perhaps find on in a library it is well worth it. Also, if it’s theory you’re looking for what’s wrong with Bowditch’s American Practical Navigator?

Ditto, Bowditch still in print and the bible of modern celestial navigation. Served me well all these years, why reinvent the wheel?

I just ordered that book through Amazon Prime. It’ll be at the house tomorrow. Looking forward to reading it.

[QUOTE=“Capnklump;115382”]
I just ordered that book through Amazon Prime. It’ll be at the house tomorrow. Looking forward to reading it.[/QUOTE]

It’s waiting for me at C-Port…

[QUOTE=“captobie;115323”]Mariner’s Celestial Navigation by William P. Crawford is outstanding, but out of print.

http://www.amazon.com/Mariners-Celestial-Navigation-William-Crawford/dp/0393600033

If you can find a good deal on a copy or perhaps find on in a library it is well worth it. Also, if it’s theory you’re looking for what’s wrong with Bowditch?[/QUOTE]

That cover looks very familiar. Hopefully it’s because it is on my bookshelf at home. I’ll check in a few weeks.

[QUOTE=“Xmsccapt(ret);115329”]

Ditto, Bowditch still in print and the bible of modern celestial navigation. Served me well all these years, why reinvent the wheel?[/QUOTE]

Bowditch doesn’t cover Chief Mate level celestial, like backsights, ex-meridians, or meridian transit of bodies other than the sun.

Odd, seems that’s where I studied for my license exams. I know ex-meridians are in Bowditch, as well as meridian transit. If one can work one type then other bodies are not that much different really. Had no trouble… To each his own I suppose. I don’t recall using any other exam prep material.

Start studying and soon celestial will “click”. Once you understand LHA, declination, and assumed position really are the rest is really a snap.

[QUOTE=Bloodyshitcakes;115552]Start studying and soon celestial will “click”. Once you understand LHA, declination, and assumed position really are the rest is really a snap.[/QUOTE]

Or you can do one perfect sight reduction backwards… finish to start. It will click you find your last mistake and “finish” your first one.

Of course I should note that the first time I did one entirely backwards it took an entire week of very late nights :wink:

I found a used copy in good condition here:

http://www.alibris.com/Mariner-s-celestial-navigation-William-P-Crawford/book/4188727?qsort=p&matches=17&cm_sp=workslistingbuyused

[QUOTE=“Xmsccapt(ret);115534”]

Odd, seems that’s where I studied for my license exams. I know ex-meridians are in Bowditch, as well as meridian transit. If one can work one type then other bodies are not that much different really. Had no trouble… To each his own I suppose. I don’t recall using any other exam prep material.[/QUOTE]

Please provide a page number where Bowditch explains how to do ex-meridians…

[QUOTE=captobie;115323]Mariner’s Celestial Navigation by William P. Crawford is outstanding, but out of print.

If you can find a good deal on a copy or perhaps find on in a library it is well worth it. Also, if it’s theory you’re looking for what’s wrong with Bowditch?[/QUOTE]

Mitsubishi available at Captain nautical in Seattle. It’s probably available directly from Crawford Nautical school in Seattle.
MBA

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;115579]Please provide a page number where Bowditch explains how to do ex-meridians…[/QUOTE]

Which edition? The latest edition on-line there is an explanation on page 562, Explanation of Navigation Tables.

Here is the link

It’s table 24 and 25

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Volume II, edition 1981. Page 540. Using tables 29 and 30. Seems pretty clear cut in the explanation. I remember working a few practice for the test, and doing it at sea a few times for practice. But not something that is normally required.

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[QUOTE=“Kennebec Captain;115582”]

Which edition? The latest edition on-line there is an explanation on page 562, Explanation of Navigation Tables.

Here is the link

It’s table 24 and 25[/QUOTE]

By Jove, you found it. I searched for any mention of ex-meridian and barely found a definition. Thanks for the information.

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;115611]By Jove, you found it. I searched for any mention of ex-meridian and barely found a definition. Thanks for the information.[/QUOTE]

It was easier to find in the older editions, there used to be a longer explanation in the chapter on Sight Reduction and could be found by using the index.

Maybe navigators using a calculator or computer for sight reduction have less need for ex-meridians.

[QUOTE=“Kennebec Captain;115628”]It was easier to find in the older editions, there used to be a longer explanation in the chapter on Sight Reduction and could be found by using the index. [/QUOTE]

I wish they would go back to two full volumes. I think they cut out a lot of good info when they consolidated them into one.

[QUOTE=“Kennebec Captain;115628”]Maybe navigators using a calculator or computer for sight reduction have less need for ex-meridians.[/QUOTE]

Or GPS systems…

[QUOTE=captobie;115323]Mariner’s Celestial Navigation by William P. Crawford is outstanding, but out of print.

If you can find a good deal on a copy or perhaps find on in a library it is well worth it. Also, if it’s theory you’re looking for what’s wrong with Bowditch?[/QUOTE]

Another vote for Crawford Nautical Mariner’s Celestial Navigation by William P. Crawford. I have a plastic tub full of C-Nav books. This book made it easy!