Where is this school heading to?


#1

This school has changed a lot since Admiral Alfultis is in charge of this school.
Current Student Population in this school is:
60% reg
40% civilian.Seem like our president is trying to make this college into a community college rather than a maritime academy.
I think SUNYMC losing its priority mission which is training future mariners but instead she is heading toward being a liberal art college.

Maybe someday SUNYMC will become “East Tretmont College”:wink:

lol…


#2
Is that true? When I was there, not too long ago, the civilian population was more around 30% maybe less. Of course we also always joked that it was becoming Throggs Neck CC.

#3

[QUOTE=LI_Domer;189852]Is that true? When I was there, not too long ago, the civilian population was more around 30% maybe less. Of course we also always joked that it was becoming Throggs Neck CC.[/QUOTE]

Not Throgs Neck Tech? (Guffaw guffaw)


#4

It will always be Throg’s Neck Tech to me, regaress of what they call it.


#5

I guess nobody give a shit about faith of this college.
Oh well, in another 5-10 yr SUNYMC will East Tretmont Tech College with coast guard license program.

lol


#6

undergraduate students are approximately 35%-40% and forget the graduate students.
I guess nobody give a shit about faith of this college.
Oh well, in another 5-10 yr SUNYMC will East Tretmont Tech College.

lol

      • Updated - - -

This is really sad…TNT(Throgs Neck Tech)


#7

[QUOTE=chieflit0902;189879]undergraduate students are approximately 35%-40% and dont forget the graduate students portion.
I guess nobody give a shit about faith of this college.
Oh well, in another 5-10 yr SUNYMC will become East Tretmont Tech College.

lol

      • Updated - - -

This is really sad…TNT(Throgs Neck Tech)[/QUOTE]

Sorry for typos


#8

From what the college says, they are reducing the size of the mug classes from well over 300 to about 250 so they can go back to 60 day cruises and improve the quality of the license program. Those civilian students serve as a way to provide better funding and facilities for the regimented students. The state provides money based on enrollment and the civilian students add to this exponentially because most don’t require housing (a lot of commuter students) and don’t take resources away from license students. It’s basically a win-win. The MAC (Maritime Academic Center) was built with funding based on this, and many of the ongoing improvements as well. And with a more compact and higher quality license program, there will be less competition when you graduate for jobs. Most of the other state schools offer non-license degrees as well, so I’m struggling to see what the problem is. Is it really that bad? Do you have many classes with those civilian students outside your core gen-ed classes? If you sail on your license these kids are not in competition with you and if you don’t, you still have the advantage.

Were you there for the reign of Wendy Carpenter? She was universally loathed by students and staff alike and was forced to leave. I think Admiral Alfutis has done a tremendous amount for the students and has worked tireless to elevate and promote the reputation of the college.


#9

They need fewer students on the training crusies. I heard this year was a shit show with way too many seniors that were standing around watching each other work.


#10

It is pretty bad!!!
This corrupted college just keep accepting for more civilian students.
And guess what?
There is not enough faculties to teach and we regiment students cant get in to a class due to packed class room.
As a result, we stay have to stay here for an extra year or a semester and paying $9,000 - $18,000.
How lovely!!!
I fking love this school.


#11

What classes would you be taking that are the same as the civvies? They’re not in the license classes, are they?


#12

Didn’t have the same experience at all. Try having the department chair override the course for you if you need to get into a class. If it’s taking you more than 4 years it’s not them, it’s you. If they are core classes, take them at a community college or online during break. I can’t see how the civvies could possibly be taking license classes.


#13

I wonder how long before they lose the campus…


#14

This is just a nonsense thread. The school is doing better than it ever has. Enrollment is up and there is a lot of infrastructure improvements. The civilian kids don’t take license classes so there isn’t a problem with them taking spots, it’s just that some of the kids don’t bother studying enough to pass the classes. The small handful that can’t graduate in four years is due to academics, not class closeouts. The department chair can always override to get them in the class. The only real reason you would graduate late is if you missed cruise because you didn’t pass the prerequisite classes. The overwhelming majority of students are still in the regiment, and the mission remains the same. So what’s the real issue?


#15

60/40… very overwhelming! The school should say “We’re going to accept X number of students” and if X isn’t reached with reg students, the non reg can fill them few spots. This shift has been happening for a number of years.


#16

[QUOTE=saltyseamen;190644]This is just a nonsense thread. The school is doing better than it ever has. Enrollment is up and there is a lot of infrastructure improvements. The civilian kids don’t take license classes so there isn’t a problem with them taking spots, it’s just that some of the kids don’t bother studying enough to pass the classes. The small handful that can’t graduate in four years is due to academics, not class closeouts. The department chair can always override to get them in the class. The only real reason you would graduate late is if you missed cruise because you didn’t pass the prerequisite classes. The overwhelming majority of students are still in the regiment, and the mission remains the same. So what’s the real issue?[/QUOTE]

The school has issues. Most of the seniors here know it.

The dorms are over crowded, not enough classes are offered for either deck or engine, 1/c cruise is no longer a good learning experience, the engineer program under utilizes its labs.

Basically the school needs to refocus on what is important but SUNY pushes for more students.


#17

I think most of our graduates probably doesnt even know what is happening in this school.
They kick shit tons of 1/c out of new dorm because they accept shit tons of civilian student which is good… and I happy about it because it is becoming a Throggs Neck Tech. Also, the class room is quite crowded, approximately 30-50 ppl and I really like because you get know more people.
Also, registration is going perfect right now because freshman get to registrar first…which is good as well because we need to be nice to the freshman. If you didnt get in to a class then u have to fight through the whole campus to get into one class.
Yeah, this college is way better than it use to be.


#18

“civilian” students, you mean everyone not in ROTC?

I’m sure you’ll be a joy to sail with. Everyone who isn’t ROTC is a civilian, I’m sorry you’re perceived superiority because at 19 you got to be the leader of the bed time inspections is being eroded.


#19

No, SUNY (and most of the other state academies too) have what’s normally called “non-reg” (non-regiment or not in the license program) students too. At Texas, where I went, they were 90% of the student body in the late 90’s. There’s been a lot of teeth gnashing from some of the purists that unrightfully feel this erodes the regimental/license program. I didn’t see that as the case even now in hindsight, and don’t understand why some think it’s such a bad thing.

Calling them civilians is kinda snooty and not really the right terminology, since most of the regimental guys are not even in SIP, much less ROTC.


#20

[QUOTE=jbtam99;190853]No, SUNY (and most of the other state academies too) have what’s normally called “non-reg” (non-regiment or not in the license program) students too. At Texas, where I went, they were 90% of the student body in the late 90’s. There’s been a lot of teeth gnashing from some of the purists that unrightfully feel this erodes the regimental/license program. I didn’t see that as the case even now in hindsight, and don’t understand why some think it’s such a bad thing.

Calling them civilians is kinda snooty and not really the right terminology, since most of the regimental guys are not even in SIP, much less ROTC.[/QUOTE]

Yeah I’m familiar with how the schools work, I went to one. I was calling him an asshole in other words because the kind of person that bitches about the “civilians” ruining the school is exactly the kind of couldn’t get into Kings Point or Annapolis asshole that should have just joined the navy.