Well this is a big coup for Dakota Creek


#1

hearing more and more talk about their being a new generation of factory trawlers coming to fish the Bering Sea. Nice to know they are all going to be American built this time!

[B]U.S.-built trawler will be most environmental friendly yet[/B]


Newbuild will be named America’s Finest

NOVEMBER 24, 2014 — Norwegian ship designer Skipsteknisk AS says the new 261.8 ft freezer trawler ordered from shipbuilder Dakota Creek Industries, Anacortes, WA, by Fisherman’s Finest, Kirkland, WA, will be its “most environmental and carbon footprint friendly vessel to date.”

The ship, to be named America’s Finest, has been designed to operate within the parameters set byAmendment 80 to the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Fishery Management Plan which allocates several Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) non-pollock trawl groundfish species among trawl fishery sectors.

As we reported earlier, the vessel will have an MAN Diesel & Turbo main engine and propulsion package.

The U.S.-flag stern trawler is being built to produce frozen-at-sea white fish products and groundfish, including yellow- and rock sole species.

Its operating area will be the North Pacific, Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea inside the U.S. EEZ. Its super efficient capabilities in towing, processing and freezing of catch will set a new standard for the entire Bering Sea fleet, says Skipsteknisk.

The new ST-116XL design has following main dimensions:

Overall length: 79.80 m
Length bp: 70.80 m
Breadth molded:15.40 m
Depth main deck midship: 6.15 m
Depth trawl deck midship: 9.10 m
Depth 1st deck midships: 11.70 m
Depth 2nd deck midships: 14.3 m

The new vessel will be built to class DNV GL rules for fishing vessels including clean class, and will have the hull notation +1A1, Ice 1B

The vessel design has a highly efficient hull shape which reduces hull resistance when sailing in ice or at open sea.

The accommodations and interior outfitting is designed for 49 persons, includes a hospital, and is completely insulated for the harsh working environment.

The vessel is fully rigged for pelagic - and bottom trawling. The winches are to be electrically driven and are designed for regeneration of power. The vessel will be outfitted with three working cranes for various operations.

The deck machinery will be supplied by Ibercisa of Spain,

“This machinery is undoubtedly a new departure for fishing vessels towards electrical drive,” says Ramon Carreira, Ibercisa’s General Manager of Ibercisa, adding that this type of equipment allows improved operational performance on board the vessel, with less power installed, ; lower installation costs, elimination of pipes and onboard oils, simplification of on board systems, improved noise levels, and savings in fuel costs.

On the main deck, there are arrangements for high capacity processing- and automatic freezing lines comprising graders, cutting machines, plate freezers, palletizing systems, conveyors and elevators.

The design intention in the process deck lay-out and selection of equipment for transport and handling has been to obtain a system with the largest amount of automation, assisting the employees working in the processing area. This arrangement is designed to achieve very high throughput with minimum damage, improve employee efficiency, all in a clean and safe work area.

FISHERMEN’S FINEST

Fishermen’s Finest has a rich tradition of pioneering in the fishing industry of the North Pacific and Bering Sea that dates back to 1967. CEO/COO Helena Park, pioneer of the U.S. Head and Gut (“H&G”) fisheries, has led the FFI team since 1986 and is an integral force in the establishment of the H&G fishing business, expanding product sales on a global basis, utilizing all fish products, overseeing stewardship of the resources and vessel operations.

Ms. Park is the sole director, managing officer and shareholder of Fishermen’s Finest, Inc. Ms. Park was born in South Korea and came to the United States as a high school exchange student in 1973. She holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Food and Nutritional Science from the University of California Berkeley and a Master’s of Business Administration from Pepperdine University. She began working in the fishing industry in 1982 and focused on the sales of product into Japanese, Korean and Chinese markets and has owned and operated longline catcher processors and continues to own and operate trawl catcher processors.

I wonder what is driving this? I also thought there was a moratorium in place prohibiting new vessels entering any of the Alaskan Federal fisheries. I guess the quota shares from existing vessels will be rationalized into this new ship?


National Academies say U.S. research fleet needs rebuilding
#2

"American Fisheries Act was modified in 2010 to allow Bering Sea vessel owners to replace or rebuild their fleets. "


#3

Ohara has a similar Norwegian design under construction in Florida. It must be pretty well along by now.


#4

Sweet. Would love to see machinery and accommodations layout.


#5

[QUOTE=c.captain;148669]hearing more and more talk about their being a new generation of factory trawlers coming to fish the Bering Sea. Nice to know they are all going to be American built this time!

I wonder what is driving this? I also thought there was a moratorium in place prohibiting new vessels entering any of the Alaskan Federal fisheries. I guess the quota shares from existing vessels will be rationalized into this new ship?[/QUOTE]

Both of this companies existing vessels are American Built. One being a converted mud boat, the other being the American No. 1, built at Marco Seattle in '79 as the first American built C/P being sent to the north pacific to displace the foreign fleet ( hence the name…) . Obviously the rest of the Alaskan fleet is a different story. As for the quota, boats are still changing hands throughout the fleet, as well as their quota. Not sure whether they are going to fish all 3 vessels or move quota around and tie something up, but there are options out there. Its very exciting to see a few companies venturing out to build modern equipment.


#6

[QUOTE=snacktray;148745]Both of this companies existing vessels are American Built. One being a converted mud boat, the other being the American No. 1, built at Marco Seattle in '79 as the first American built C/P being sent to the north pacific to displace the foreign fleet ( hence the name…) . Obviously the rest of the Alaskan fleet is a different story. As for the quota, boats are still changing hands throughout the fleet, as well as their quota. Not sure whether they are going to fish all 3 vessels or move quota around and tie something up, but there are options out there. Its very exciting to see a few companies venturing out to build modern equipment.[/QUOTE]

I didn’t know this company has the AMERICA NO. 1…very interesting indeed. What’s this Ms. Park like? Anything like the “Dragon Lady” from Bayonne?


#7

Put simply, she is good at what she does. She knows whats going on throughout the entire company, fisheries, vessels, crew, everything. Being the sole shareholder, she has an advantage few companies have; She doesn’t have to compromise on things, and from the looks of this new build there really will be no compromises. Lots of people have built very nice boats, but few (fishing) boats come to mind when I try to think of builds that have embraced [I]all[/I] the best technologies from their era( American No. 1, Starbound… ). I think this will be another one of those boats. It will be very interesting watching this come together.


#8

[QUOTE=snacktray;148763]Put simply, she is good at what she does. She knows whats going on throughout the entire company, fisheries, vessels, crew, everything. Being the sole shareholder, she has an advantage few companies have; She doesn’t have to compromise on things, and from the looks of this new build there really will be no compromises. Lots of people have built very nice boats, but few (fishing) boats come to mind when I try to think of builds that have embraced [I]all[/I] the best technologies from their era( American No. 1, Starbound… ). I think this will be another one of those boats. It will be very interesting watching this come together.[/QUOTE]

sounds like a woman who knows how to be a winner all around. you gonna be part of this new ship?


#9

ME? nah. Sounds fun, but Ive got other plans. Somewhere warm

( not to say that it was an option or anything )


#10

I operate one Dakota Creek boat. I have never been on anything that comes close in terms of quality of construction and functionality.


#11

[QUOTE=87cr250r;148818]I operate one Dakota Creek boat. I have never been on anything that comes close in terms of quality of construction and functionality.[/QUOTE]
I’ve done several drydockings and many repairs and mods there. The best I’ve ever worked with.


#12

I know that there had been a thread started about this sad debacle but can’t find it so posting this news here…

USCG: U.S.-Built Trawler is Not Jones Act-Qualified


America’s Finest (file image via social media)

By Sandra L. Knapp 2017-09-05 20:26:49

The U.S. Coast Guard has issued another letter ruling on U.S.-built vessels with foreign-made components. The latest case involves a factory trawler named America’s Finest under construction in the state of Washington. Certain “cold-formed” steel plates were already installed as part of the hull and the cold-forming process was conducted overseas. A U.S. shipyard requested coastwise and fisheries trade status for the vessel, and was just denied by the U.S. Coast Guard.

The U.S. Coast Guard regulatory limitation provides that only 1.5 percent of a vessel’s steel weight may consist of foreign fabricated components. Steel plates sourced overseas but not “fabricated” overseas may be used without such a limitation. But in this case, the U.S. Coast Guard relied on precedent and numerous past determinations that “cold-forming” is considered fabrication of steel and is therefore subject to the 1.5 percent standard. The foreign fabricated steel weight in this case exceeds 1.5 percent.

America’s Finest is, therefore, not eligible for coastwise or fisheries trade status under the U.S. Coast Guard regulations and interpretation. The U.S. shipyard in this case is also seeking a waiver of U.S. build requirements through a legislative process, and will presumably continue to pursue it.

I mean back in the 80’s and 90’s the USCG was giving fisheries endorsements to any vessel coming from Norway with a tiny piece of an old US vessel in their hulls and now they can’t overlook what was an obvious oversight on the builder’s part?


#13

A one time exception is certainly warranted in this case. They will get it one way or another.

I hope this fiasco doesn’t bankrupt both Dakota Creek and Fisherman’s Finest. Who is financing this vessel?

I had heard someone claim that Aker Philly used prefab modules from Korea in the Jones Act tankers it built. That must not be true.

After a year of set backs, O’Hara’s new Norwegian designed and Florida built factory trawler, ARAHO, started fishing this summer. I believe that they bought quota from FCA and retired an existing boat.


#14

I’ve been in and out of the Schuykill enough the last few years to say it would have been awful stealthy if they brought modules in from Korea at Aker Philly. Not to mention they always have sections in various stages of construction in the yard.


#15

So a few bent plates can force this vessel to be sold to a foreign buyer, if one can be found.
Being built in USA that may be hard, unless the price match what a similar vessel built elsewhere would cost. (Being the 6th vessel of the same design fair price would be easy to determine)

Looking at the main equipment list it is all of foreign origin and from reputable manufactures well known in the industry, so that would not be a hindrance: http://www.fishermensfinest.com/index.php/ships-blog/180-americas-finest

Even if the entire steel used in the construction was foreign supplied, that would be OK, but if a few plates are bent abroad it can stop this vessel from being registered in USA??

Maybe time to look at what is rational and what is not in the Jones Act, or whatever other Acts that gets into play here.


#16

I thought congress gave this vessel a waiver, like a few months ago.


#17

So the steel hull, the cheapest part on a new build has to be manufactured in the US, but all the expensive equipment inside the hull can be foreign?

You played yourself.


#18

Our politicians have been playing (with) themselves using our money for decades.


#19

I suppose the worst case scenario would be that Dakota Creek would have to replace enough of the rolled plates to get below the 1.5% threshold, but that will never happen.

Congress will pass an exemption for this vessel. As it should.


#20

I thought this had already been fixed by the Congress…what a DISASTER for the yard!

why doesn’t Dakota Creek remove the plates in question and replace them with US sourced ones but more importantly, why won’t Congress allow a waiver?