Thoughts and concerns of the new Regimental Administrators at SUNY Maritime


#321

[QUOTE=domer;107660]Schuyler also has the best Master’s degree program run by Jeff Weiss, who is excellent! And Weiss does a good job at keeping the grad students pretty well insulated from the likes of Hanft! While this may not seem to matter to undergrads it, in fact, has a profound impact on the school. The grad program attracts people from some of the best Wall Street firms and places them in the same license classes as the undergrads. This, in effect, gives students interested in high salary finance jobs in-house mentoring and access to high level contacts outside the industry.[/QUOTE]

You make some good points but this one in particular I would have to contest. I’m sure SUNY Maritime’s master’s program is very good but I would be hesitant to call it “the best”. While I cannot comment on any statistics what I do know is that Maine’s master’s program (International Business and Logistics) has been very competitive over the last decade across an array of industries and as a result has raked in loads of cash both for the graduates of the program and for the school itself. The proximity to Wall Street, and Manhattan in general, is an obvious advantage for SUNY but I would argue that SUNY’s master’s program and Maine’s master’s program are very close to on par.


#322

[QUOTE=PaddyWest2012;107667]You make some good points but this one in particular I would have to contest. I’m sure SUNY Maritime’s master’s program is very good but I would be hesitant to call it “the best”. While I cannot comment on any statistics what I do know is that Maine’s master’s program (International Business and Logistics) has been very competitive over the last decade across an array of industries and as a result has raked in loads of cash both for the graduates of the program and for the school itself. [/QUOTE]

I have heard very good things about Maine’s grad program and, to be honest I don’t know enough about it to compare the two. What I am saying is that Weiss is excellent and has my full vote of confidence. Maine may be just as good but I can’t imagine it being any better, not while Weiss is still involved.

[QUOTE=PaddyWest2012;107667]The proximity to Wall Street, and Manhattan in general, is an obvious advantage for SUNY but I would argue that SUNY’s master’s program and Maine’s master’s program are very close to on par.[/QUOTE]

Don’t forget I also mentioned Stamford, Connecticut which some call the ship finance capital of the world. While I personally doubt it’s in the same league as London or Oslo it certainly has more ship owners, brokers and ops managers with VERY DEEP pockets than any other city in this country. And the CMA is a big supporter of the school.


#323

[QUOTE=domer;107660]What you are all forgetting is that a decent portion of graduates at all the academies take shoreside jobs and, due to its location between Manhattan and Stamford Connecticut, the shoreside job opportunities for SUNY graduates far exceeds that of Maine or even Mass. More than a few cadets walk into 6figure jobs on Wall Street or at a marine brokerage house in Stamford. This, not the quality of education, is the reason why Schuyler outranks the other schools in terms of ROI.
.[/QUOTE]

I’ll agree with that BUT $100,000/year in Manhattan or Stamford will not be a ticket to living the high life. Cost of living in those areas is stupid expensive.


#324

You don’t have to live in manhattan or Stamford. Ideally you would live in an inexpensive apartment in Westchester and take the Metro-North to get downtown or drive to Stamford.

With a 100k salary there’s plenty of housing available.


#325

[QUOTE=Jetryder223;107588]Cadetmom -

I agree with the above. You probably have more power to effect change than any one else posting on these threads. You are the customer paying SUNY Maritimes bills. You have every right to expect good value for dollars spent.

I believe SUNY M has a parents association with an email network. You should use your voice there to raise your concerns. A vocal group of unhappy parents is something no school administration can ignore.

Regarding the term “sabotage”. Please know we are not talking about physical damage to persons or property. It’s a term borne out of bravado and testostorone. The sabotage we are refering to involves the take down of arrogance and some over inflated egos. The objective is to return SUNY Maritime to a great school of higher learning free of over-the-top harrassment and intimidation.

The reorientation or removal of Hanft will achieve this objective.[/QUOTE]

In 2001, the graduating class of '01 was not going to get STCW training (BST, ARPA, BRM) because it wasn’t yet required (the class of '02 was the first that were required to meet STCW). However, all the other academies had the training putting Maritime cadets at a serious disadvantage when competing for jobs with cadets from the other academies. After strong outcry from parents, the classes were hurriedly added to the curriculum.


#326

[QUOTE=domer;107660]This is correct. SUNY has a humanities degree but very few cadets are enrolled. They also have a Marine Environmental Science degree which is slightly more popular but starting salaries are equally terrible. There has been some talk about changing these programs to something that offers better opportunities after graduation but the school is slow to accept change. Neither is as popular as some of the similar low pay degrees offered at the other schools.

[/QUOTE]

Marine Environmental Science is the dumbed-down replacement for the Meteorology and Oceanography degrees that used to be offered (limited calculus, and no Diff EQs or fluid and thermo dynamics). In the late 70’s there were as many as 14 undergraduate different degree options that included a 3rd Mate or 3rd AE program. The regiment was as minimal as it’s ever been, and enrollment and applications were at record levels. In the 80s they began eliminating degree options, and increasing the presence of the regiment.

Maine has a good graduate program (I’m a graduate of it). Their modular format allows them to bring in guest instructors from top schools like MIT, Wharton, Dartmouth, etc. (it takes more than one good instructor to make a good program)


#327

Gentlemen I have to agree. After seeing both sides of the story I as both a mariner and a Marine find that the two do not mix for a Myriad of reasons. But the most compelling reason is that this woman in charge is creating a caustic and dangerous environment for her future endeavours leading the academy. May I remind you mam…the true passion of command steams from knowing your warriors, (cadets), living next to them and getting out of that AC. I hear your complaints and wish I could have a frank discussion as one officer to another. But lady… You must understand, we are US citizens we are dealing with. And queite frankly I induced more humanity in my day to da dealings with people than yo’re sorry effort.


#328

Sweatcn great was I interced?


#329

Absolutely it will. These Maritime Academies all shine upon graduation. They are truly unbreakable no matter how many “Admiral’s” come and go at the top.

No soft majors. USCG licenses create perfect barriers to outside competition for technology driven skilled jobs. I think the reason SUNY came out higher than Mass or any others is our close proximity to Wall Street. My era had many grads shift into the financial sector. I don’t think it had anything at all to do with the quality of the school or which Admiral was in the President’s chair.


#330

About the regiments at maritime academies:

The student population has evolved to unrecognizable levels nowadays thanks to the GI Bill and the Iraq/Afgani wars. And kids are simply growing up slower.

With Uncle Sam hyper funding all the military folks separating out of the services, the academies are gorging on the feast of older, more mature new students. Also transfers from normal colleges are at all time highs (including my son transferring from University of California, Davis to CMA).

My son’s Freshman class at CMA is expected to be over 40% transfers and older students. This changes the dynamic greatly from back in my day at SUNY.

Cadets right out of high school now not only have to adjust to typical first year challenges, but are also out maneuvered in maturity and educational background. (My kid will enter with all Calculus, Physics and Chemistry completed plus another 20 transferable credits or so).

Some right out of high schoolers I saw on campus looked weaker, less confident, and emotionally regressed compared to the older students coming in.

How can a single regiment serve all these types fairly? The veterans just shake their heads at the teenager trying to lead. The transfers from fraternities, college weight rooms and threesomes on the beach can strut around focused on being top dogs at deck and engine courses.

I met a female cadet with a rate, I asked her what there is to do on weekends. She said she likes to make forts in her dorm room with sheets, blankets and pillows. Almost scared my son from applying to CMA… Until he met a bunch of transfers and more worldly people.

Anyway, point is, that back in the day we were all green behind the ear as we collectively learned from and resisted the regimental systems. It was a right of passage. Now it seems like the student body has evolved.

I met another third class cadet at CMA’s open house. This guy loved the place. HE WAS 68 YEARS OLD! Lived in the dorms, his roommate was 19. His wife lives in SF and they Skype every night. He plans on sailing on his third mate’s license when he graduates… At 71.


#331

And the fairy tale story just keeps getting better.

Our newest Regimental Officer…[B]A U.S. Airmen![/B]

“Oh you flew planes? They’re kinda like boats! Welcome aboard!”


#332

[QUOTE=Starboard Ten;107731]I met another third class cadet at CMA’s open house. This guy loved the place. HE WAS 68 YEARS OLD! Lived in the dorms, his roommate was 19. His wife lives in SF and they Skype every night. He plans on sailing on his third mate’s license when he graduates… At 71.[/QUOTE]

WOW !!
This is indeed different and some folks think of us geezers as a mentally challenged lot, well, I’m here to tell you I’m just as nuts at 72 as I was at 22. No change ~

Your post about the changing dynamic of a given class is interesting. I never thought about it but you are correct. In my day we all were basically on the same page. I got to give this some thought but at the moment I question my ability as a 17 year old boy-man (yes, I was 17 when I entered KP in Aug, 1958) to compete in a class largely composed of older students with good educational backgrounds plus some being in the military, possible in combat also. Talk about a game changer.


#333

I am assuming you are talking about SUNY. Who is this guy? Can’t find an email about him in the last few they have sent out.


#334

[QUOTE=flyboy14295;107746]And the fairy tale story just keeps getting better.

Our newest Regimental Officer…[B]A U.S. Airmen![/B]

“Oh you flew planes? They’re kinda like boats! Welcome aboard!”[/QUOTE]

I am assuming you are talking about SUNY. What is this person? Haven’t seen an email mentioning anything like that, could have missed it though.


#335

[QUOTE=jdcavo;107712]Marine Environmental Science is the dumbed-down replacement for the Meteorology and Oceanography degrees that used to be offered (limited calculus, and no Diff EQs or fluid and thermo dynamics). In the late 70’s there were as many as 14 undergraduate different degree options that included a 3rd Mate or 3rd AE program. The regiment was as minimal as it’s ever been, and enrollment and applications were at record levels. In the 80s they began eliminating degree options, and increasing the presence of the regiment.

Maine has a good graduate program (I’m a graduate of it). Their modular format allows them to bring in guest instructors from top schools like MIT, Wharton, Dartmouth, etc. (it takes more than one good instructor to make a good program)[/QUOTE]

Maine — very foolishly, in my opinion — did away with the modular format for the graduate program. The grad school has abandoned its original mission to provide a graduate education for working mariners.


#336

[QUOTE=jdcavo;107712]Maine has a good graduate program (I’m a graduate of it). Their modular format allows them to bring in guest instructors from top schools like MIT, Wharton, Dartmouth, etc. (it takes more than one good instructor to make a good program)[/QUOTE]

Good point!

Does Maine offer a license program for grad students? Do they take some of the same classes as undergrads?

The point I am making is that Schuyler’s graduate license program integrates young wall street professionals with undergraduates. This gives the undergrad cadets looking for shoreside jobs access to high quality mentors and really helps widen their options post-graduation.


#337

[QUOTE=Whiplasher;107753]I am assuming you are talking about SUNY. What is this person? Haven’t seen an email mentioning anything like that, could have missed it though.[/QUOTE]

Yes, SUNY. He was the gentleman that was walking around at afternoon formation a few weeks ago. He has been shadowing the Chief around, and learning how to rip assholes for people that aren’t wearing their panties the right way.


#338

[QUOTE=Jetryder223;107532]Love it. But Hanft would probably push back with something like ‘That was then, this is now BS’. [/QUOTE]

Are Schuyler cadets still required to memorize the Sally Port saying?

“But Men and Officer’s must obey no matter at what cost to their feelings. For obedience to Orders- Instant and Unhesitating, is not only the lifeblood of armies, but the security of states…”


#339

[QUOTE=domer;107758]Are Schuyler cadets still required to memorize the Sally Port saying?

“But Men and Officer’s must obey no matter at what cost to their feelings. For obedience to Orders- Instant and Unhesitating, is not only the lifeblood of armies, but the security of states…”[/QUOTE]

During INDOC, yes. But the day graduation comes, it’s gone…

This saying holds true for many reasons, and nobody will deny that fact. But there is a point at which “obedience to orders” must be questioned, especially if the orders are just made up by some tyrannical leader on a power-trip.

If people are no longer able to question as a free-thinking society…you might as well call it communism.


#340

[QUOTE=domer;107758]Are Schuyler cadets still required to memorize the Sally Port saying?

“But Men and Officer’s must obey no matter at what cost to their feelings. For obedience to Orders- Instant and Unhesitating, is not only the lifeblood of armies, but the security of states…”[/QUOTE]

The one in the gym from Riesenberg would be a better choice to memorize…