Thoughts and concerns of the new Regimental Administrators at SUNY Maritime


#261

[QUOTE=SUNYcadet;107317]If Hanft keeps doing what she is doing, she will bring the school down one way or another. Talk about cadet’s putting money together for a class action law suit against what Hanft is doing, sounds justified, but will essentially end up being a law suit against SUNY Maritime, not Hanft herself. If SUNY Maritime wants to keep their reputation, customers (students), and funding, Hanft needs to leave. Upon her termination/resignation, I’d say about 80% or her ‘rulings’ should be over turned. She has personally gotten cadets kicked off of cruise and out of the regiment, single-handed, by unfairly changing the number of demerits for a certain offense just to put a certain cadet over their demerit cap. Cadets are starting to realize there are real monetary damages that occur based on Hanfts actions and decisions. MONETARY DAMAGES = LAW SUIT. There has been a loss of Due Process as Hanft’s decisions are final.

I really hope someone puts together an anonymous survey that would gather the effects of Hanfts actions on an individual basis, analyze, and pursue justice. Once it comes to that, and in the hands of a lawyer, the institution of SUNY Maritime will be at risk.[/QUOTE]

The cadets who have the most to lose at this point are the ones who have completed all 3 cruises and are nearing CG license exam. They’re being kicked out left and right. They’re being targeted for minor infractions so that the point cap and get thrown out.


#262

[QUOTE=Sweat-n-Grease;107367]If it takes demerits, and a regiment, to weed-out such students perhaps SUNY needs to be more circumspect with the applicants accepted.
Also, maintaining a spotless boiler suit in the ER is way off the charts. In no manner what so ever is this close to the real world.[/QUOTE]

I am suspicious of engineers and surveyors with spotless coveralls. . . . .


#263

[QUOTE=Sweat-n-Grease;107405]I certainly could.
Everything I read about GLMA I like, when asked what I recommend as the best maritime training institution available I reply Great Lakes. GLMA is by far the most mature of them all,[/QUOTE]

You may be right.

The only caution is it’s so small - 150 cadets total, that I’d question how good their funding is for some fairly expensive captial equipment associated with the maritme trades. A simulator can cost $2 Million. Maybe.because of their small size, they can say screw the simulator, we’ll take the class on a real ship out on Lake Michigan.

If I was looking for a maritime school, GLMA would definately be on the list to check out.


#264

[QUOTE=SomalianRoadCorporation;107385]Get ready for leagues of frat boys with third mate licenses handling multi-million dollar ships. When you make access and requirements so easy, then the quantity goes up and the quality goes down. More mariners = less demand = less pay. The regiments are just enough to repel those who aren’t serious about obtaining the license. The airline industry is a great example of how an industry is flooded when you make publicity, accessibility, and availability so relaxed.[/QUOTE]

No. No. A thousand times no. Narrow-minded nincompoopery. Sheer, unadulterated horse manure, as a high school teacher of mine used to say. As already previously discussed in this thread there are at least 3 people commenting on here right now, that is to say TraitorYankee, Z-Drive, and myself, who are PROUD members of the First Civ-Div of Maine Maritime Academy. We participated in no man’s regiment and we are NO frat-boys, but we are merchant mariners, and damn good ones, nonetheless. The careers of hundreds of MMA VOT/SVO (non-regimented deck) grads speaks volumes about the fact that your regiment means peanuts.


#265

[QUOTE=“PaddyWest2012;107422”]

No. No. A thousand times no. Narrow-minded nincompoopery. Sheer, unadulterated horse manure, as a high school teacher of mine used to say. As already previously discussed in this thread there are at least 3 people commenting on here right now, that is to say TraitorYankee, Z-Drive, and myself, who are PROUD members of the First Civ-Div of Maine Maritime Academy. We participated in no man’s regiment and we are NO frat-boys, but we are merchant mariners, and damn good ones, nonetheless. The careers of hundreds of MMA VOT/SVO (non-regimented deck) grads speaks volumes about the fact that your regiment means peanuts.[/QUOTE]

I’m not at all saying that the regiment makes the mariner.

However, if the academies are made into a typical 4-year college, you will see a drastic increase in both applicants and graduates. High paying jobs are not the easiest to come by nowadays, especially with most college degrees. This country is still in a “I need college paper to make my parents and friends proud” mood. When word gets around about the new non regimented maritime colleges and the promised jobs afterwards, the potential hard working mariner will be stampeded by new academic snobs. There will be no filter or thinning of the herd done by the academies with the exception of sea terms.

MaineMA is certainly not frat boy country. However most of the other academies are located in tourist spots and traps.

I’m no TMAcadet, I just think that getting rid of the regiments may sound like a good idea now, but beware of the long term consequences.


#266

You’re wrong. The academy size is a finite value. They can only accommodate so many students at a time. Regiment or not that wont change. Really cannot either. The size is also limited by career options and opportunities. For the most part, liberal arts excluded, people don’t go to school for things that there isn’t a supply/demand relationship to support. Two brothers in law are pharmacists with doctoral degrees; they didn’t go through 6 years of nonsense if there wasn’t demand. Same goes for nurses, engineers, etc where there is a supply/demand chain.

You are 18-20 from what I recall and do not/have not gone to an academy nor sailed in the industry for any length of time if at all, so my advice is to just consider what we are all saying in contrast to what you think.


#267

I agree that if they made the academies non regimented that it would increase applicants, but in the long run would that not hurt everyone because the amount of people trying to find work out in the field? The schools could no longer say 100% employed after 6 months…


#268

[QUOTE=Whiplasher;107429]I agree that if they made the academies non regimented that it would increase applicants, but in the long run would that not hurt everyone because the amount of people trying to find work out in the field? The schools could no longer say 100% employed after 6 months…[/QUOTE]

Increased applicants does not have to translate into increased enrollment into any program.


#269

[QUOTE=Robert;107430]Increased applicants does not have to translate into increased enrollment into any program.[/QUOTE]
You are correct. I was meaning by increased applicants that it would also increase enrollment. However someone just made a point that the size of the school will restrict the enrollment. I agree with that, just look at SUNY’s campus. That school has absolutely no where to go.


#270

[QUOTE=Whiplasher;107432]You are correct. I was meaning by increased applicants that it would also increase enrollment. However someone just made a point that the size of the school will restrict the enrollment. I agree with that, just look at SUNY’s campus. That school has absolutely no where to go.[/QUOTE]

None of them have any room to expand, not even Maine, which is in the middle of no where! We are all maxed-out. As long as the academies maintain highly discerning acceptance policies, which is a problem entirely unto itself, the presence or lack of a regiment would not make one single iota of difference in the quality of merchant mariner at graduation. As for those “highly discerning acceptance policies” we all know these schools should be doing a bit more vetting ahead of time, but they’ll just have to work on that…


#271

If they got rid of the regiments (or toned them down to the minimal CMA level) the number of applications would go way up, and the academic quality of incoming students (notice I didn’t say “cadets”) would go way up. The schools would no longer have to accept 85% of all applicants, they could probably fill each class from the top 50% of applicants. Attrition rates would drop. The quality of graduates would also go up (better raw materials in, better product coming out).

No matter what field of study, no college kid wants to wear a uniform, be told how to wear his hair, be told he can’t go to parties, be told how late he can stay up, when he can leave campus, or that his girlfriend can’t come visit for the weekend. All that regimental crap might be beneficial at a school for juvenile delinquents, but it has no place at college for paying young adults.


#272

[QUOTE=“z-drive;107428”]
You are 18-20 from what I recall and do not/have not gone to an academy nor sailed in the industry for any length of time if at all, so my advice is to just consider what we are all saying in contrast to what you think.[/QUOTE]

True. I was just pointing out that many industries have been flooded. Your example of two pharmacists is actually an example of an industry thats been flooded in most of the country. I was almost set on going to a pre-pharmacy program a year ago. Again, there just arent as many opportunities in 90% of the shoreside economy as there is offshore.

The academies have quite a few applicants but only a fraction show up for O-Week. I just think it would be beneficial for mariners and their pocketbooks to keep the status quo, considering the shortage.


#273

[QUOTE=tugsailor;107438] The schools would no longer have to accept 85% of all applicants, they could probably fill each class from the top 50% of applicants. Attrition rates would drop. The quality of graduates would also go up (better raw materials in, better product coming out).

.[/QUOTE]

That didn’t sound right so I looked up the acceptance rate for each school.

USMMA - 20% (Free is a motivator)
GLMA - 25% (Surprise!)
SUNY - 46%
Mass - 63%
Maine - 64%
CA & Texas - 69%


#274

[QUOTE=“Jetryder223;107445”]

That didn’t sound right so I looked the acceptance rate for each school.

USMMA - 20% (Free is a motivator)
GLMA - 25% (Surprise!)[/QUOTE]

GLMA has alot of applicants that already have 4 year degrees.


#275

Another thing is GLMA probably only has 40 spaces per year.

If 160 apply, there’s your 25%.


#276

It’s funny because she actually sent cadet rates around the other night to warn us to refrain from writing stuff about her and how it’s harassment. The way I see it, it’s not harassment if it’s the truth. I personally have issues with this woman as she fucked me over and I got placed on a crazy amount of restriction for something that was barely even defined as an offense in the rules and regs. I feel as if she made up her own shit. This woman needs to go. I feel as if I am wasting my money here to be treated like a prisoner. A good guy once told me that it’s not the rates who get the jobs, it’s the people who challenge the way things are. I don’t want to challenge the authority when I get hired, but I definitely challenge this shit here because I am seriously contemplating transferring to another maritime academy. Get this brig commander out of a state school, where education is supposed to be the first priority. Viva la revolucion!


#277

Imagine how perfect college would have been if there wasn’t a regiment?

You go to class with your best friends, live on or around a cool water sport focused campus. Maybe closer to 40% female… Sailing, surfing, fishing, tubing, waterskiing!

Spring break on houseboats on Lake Havasu. Semester At Sea exchange program aboard cruise ship Explorer from University of Pittsburg for pre-requisite liberal art courses…

The Quad reserved for frisbee, BBQ competitions and Jimmy Buffett tribute band concerts.

No demerits… But if you are not punctual for class you get your grade affected. Simple.

One can only dream … :slight_smile:


#278

[QUOTE=Starboard Ten;107462]Imagine how perfect college would have been if there wasn’t a regiment?

You go to class with your best friends, live on or around a cool water sport focused campus. Maybe closer to 40% female… Sailing, surfing, fishing, tubing, waterskiing!

Spring break on houseboats on Lake Havasu. Semester At Sea exchange program aboard cruise ship Explorer from University of Pittsburg for pre-requisite liberal art courses…

The Quad reserved for frisbee, BBQ competitions and Jimmy Buffett tribute band concerts.

No demerits… But if you are not punctual for class you get your grade affected. Simple.

One can only dream … :)[/QUOTE]

How it should be for the paying customers. I can understand it for the MMR (SSO) guys, but not for everyone else.


#279

[QUOTE=NYSeaMan94;107454]It’s funny because she actually sent cadet rates around the other night to warn us to refrain from writing stuff about her and how it’s harassment.[/QUOTE]

Wow, She clearly has no idea how the internet works!

[QUOTE=NYSeaMan94;107454]A good guy once told me that it’s not the rates who get the jobs, it’s the people who challenge the way things are.[/QUOTE]

Well said and I think John is clear proof of the truth of this statement!


#280

[QUOTE=Jetryder223;107448]Another thing is GLMA probably only has 40 spaces per year.

If 160 apply, there’s your 25%.[/QUOTE]

The Cadet Body at GLMA is150, only 60 applicants are admitted each year.
Attention Vets, GLMA recognizes the GI Bill.
FYI ~

https://www.nmc.edu/maritime/

https://www.nmc.edu/maritime/cadet-life/faqs.html

IMO, GLMA is the most mature of all the maritime academies, and the only one I recommend.
I wish the Academy was around back in 1958 when I was searching, but it was founded in 1969.