Thermo texts


#1

I’m buying the books for my thermodynamics course. The required text is Reeds Vol 3. There’s also an optional text called Applied Thermodynamics For Engineering Technologists by Eastop and McConkey. Its not a really really expensive book. Has anyone looked at it? Is it worth getting, or is Reeds good enough?


#2

Hi Emrobu,

Hope all is well. This link is for the optional textbook you spoke about it’s free. You might have to scroll slowly because it’s 593 pages. I hope this helps. Please keep us posted when you start different sections of your class. I would like to study along with you on my own. If you look at the table contents, there is plenty to discuss and learn. Have they provided you a course outline?

https://www.scribd.com/doc/140828329/Applied-Thermodynamics-and-Engineering-by-T-D-Eastop-and-a-McConkey#


#3

If you can understand thermodynamics concepts and theory without the math, you’ll have a much better grasp of it. Then add the math. Too many people teach thermo with only math, not concepts.


#4

Just for the record: I’m not providing free online tutoring for people who are paid to post on forums or have a whimsical passing interest in math-intensive technical subjects, or who really need a friend or what-ever the deal is. I support myself and my studies by working nights and I’m in a classroom for 30 hours a week. I don’t have the time, I’m not charitable enough, and I’m not interested in hand-holding tar-babies.


#5

Hi Embrobu - Good luck with your class. I hope the link to the book you asked about helps you out. Sounds like your just getting started. Been there done that years ago. Keep a positive attitude.

DSD


#6

Emrobu - Keep me posted if they talk about partition function’s in your class.


#7

Some folks just don’t get it. . . .


#8

0th law: self explanitory
1st law: what goes in, must come out (energy conservation)
2nd law: heat flows from hot to cold (just like water flows downhill)
3rd law: at absolute zero, shit stops

You are now an expert.


#9

[QUOTE=johnny.dollar;195784]0th law: self explanitory
1st law: what goes in, must come out (energy conservation)
2nd law: heat flows from hot to cold (just like water flows downhill)
3rd law: at absolute zero, shit stops

You are now an expert.[/QUOTE]

Oh, great. . . where were you 36 years ago. . . .


#10

[QUOTE=cmakin;195867]Oh, great. . . where were you 36 years ago. . . .[/QUOTE]

Not alive.


#11

[QUOTE=johnny.dollar;195889]Not alive.[/QUOTE]

Oh, like THAT will make me feel better. . . .


#12

The new edition of Reeds (5th, 2016) has a lot of errors. If you need this text try to get the 4th edition (1996), which doesn’t. Here is the list of corrections I have found so far. Next year when I have this topic again, I will update the list.

Chapter 1 Solutions

pg. 263: 1090 W = 1.09 kW, not 109kW
pg 264: 5.6 kN/m^2 = 0.056 bar, not 0056 bar

Chapter 2

pg. 23: [1/s] should be [l/s], litres per second, not hertz
2.985 = (0.27 kg/s)(2 kJ/kg K)(Temp. Rise), not 0.7 kg/s
pg. 24: m(W) = (m(A))(c(A)/c(w)), not m(W) = (m(A))(C(A)/C(w))
pg 26: Specific heat of ice = 2.04 kJ/kg K, not 204 kJ/kg K
pg 27: Sensible heat = (2 kg)(2.04 kJ/kg K)(15 K), not 204 kJ/kg K

Chapter 2 Solutions

pg 265: (6 m)(2π)(0.23kN) = 8.6708 kJ not (6 )(2π)(0.23kNm)= kJ
pg 266: Q[kJ] = (m[kg])(c[kJ/kg K])(T(2)[K] – T(1)[K]), not Q[kJ] = (m[kg])(A[kJ/kg K])(T(2) – T(1)) [K]

Chapter 3

pg. 36: Total axial force = (3.09 x10^8 N/m^2)(0.7854 m)(0.052 m), not 3.09x108 N/m^2

Chapter 3 Solutions

pg. 269: 4.684 x 10^8 N/m^2 = 468.4 MN/m^2, not 4684 MN/m^2
pg. 270: Initial tensile stress = 468.4 MN/m^2 – 350 MN/m^2, not 4684 MN/m^2 – 350 MN/m^2
pg. 270: Initial tensile stress = 118.4 MN/m^2, not 1184 MN/m^2

Chapter 4

pg. 42: Q = 508.2 x 10^5 J, not 508.2 x 105 J
pg 49: S§/k§ = (0.012 m)/(48 W/m K), not (0.125 m)/(48 W/m K)

Chapter 4 Solutions

pg. 271: T(1)^4 – T(2)^4 = 4.649 x 10^10, not 4.647 x 10^10

Chapter 5

pg 57: “Charles’ law states that the volume of a fixed mass of a perfect gas varies directly as its absolute temperature if the absolute pressure remains unchanged”; not “if the pressure remains unchanged.”
pg 72: Question 2: “0.2 m^3 of a gas…” not “02 m^3 of a gas…”

Chapter 5 Solutions

pg 276: ii) p(1)V(1) = p(2)V(2) , not 2. p(1)V(1) = p(2)V(2)
pg 276: 2. (p(1)V(1)/T(1)) = (p(2)V(2)/T(2))
pg 278: Increase in internal energy = 417.8 kJ, not 417 – 8 kJ
pg 279: 417.8 kJ Ans. (ii)©, not (ii)(b)
pg 279: 167 kJ Ans. (ii)(b), not (ii)©

Chapter 6

pg 78: pV^n = Constant, not pVn = Constant
pg 88: “Example 6.10. 7.08 litres of air…”, not “Example 6.10. A7.08 litres of air…”

Chapter 6 Solutions

pg 283: V(1) = 0.0679 m^3, not 0.1142 m^3
pg 283: V(2) = 0.1142 m^3, not 00679 m^3
pg 284: Change in enthalpy = -75.375 kJ, not -75 – 375 kJ

Chapter 7, 8, 9 not checked

Chapter 10

pg 160: h = h(f) + (x)(h(fg)), not h = h(f+) h(fg)
pg 162: h = h(f) + (x)(h(fg)), not h = hf + xhf(g)

Chapter 11-14 not checked

Selection of Examination Questions – Second Engineer

pg. 344: “3. (i) A refrigerated hold of 580 m^2 surface area is lined with a 100 mm thick layer of insulation of thermal conductivity 0.17 W/m K.” not “017 W/m K.”

Solutions to Examination Questions – Second Engineer

pg 355: V(2) = (0.2592)(1.3√(7/3.5)), not 1.3√(7)/3.5
pg 362: T(i) – T(o) = 100 – 15, not 100 - 85