The X-Bow LNG Carrier Concept


#1

How do an X-Bow vessel handle in the wind? I’m thinking its going to want to turn off the wind. What about anchoring? Trying to anchor on a windy day as soon as you back down the bow is going to want to swing. And at anchor? Do they jack around on the hook like some car ships do?

K.C.


#2

A combination of tunnel and azimuthing forward thrusters would likely keep the bow right where you want it, but then again, I imagine it’s pretty rare to see one at anchor though unless something was broken.


#3

[QUOTE=Kennebec Captain;84449]How do an X-Bow vessel handle in the wind? I’m thinking its going to want to turn off the wind. What about anchoring? Trying to anchor on a windy day as soon as you back down the bow is going to want to swing. And at anchor? Do they jack around on the hook like some car ships do?

K.C.[/QUOTE]

As long as the pivot point is forward I think you’d still round up into the wind even though you have more sail area forward. Definitely with a deep draft, but not so sure with a supply boat. Going straight into the wind would be difficult though. Lots of adjustments coming into an anchorage I would think. If you lost the bow, it would be a pain recovering.


#4

LNG will not have thrusters, just one propellar and one rudder with possible bow thruster.

Been with shipbuilding for three decades, I witness that finally human being can come up with the bow that make sense.

The conventional bow shaped ship has no advantage over X-Bow ship, period.


#5

[QUOTE=Kennebec Captain;84449]How do an X-Bow vessel handle in the wind? I’m thinking its going to want to turn off the wind. What about anchoring? Trying to anchor on a windy day as soon as you back down the bow is going to want to swing. And at anchor? Do they jack around on the hook like some car ships do?

K.C.[/QUOTE]

On a 120 meter X-Bow, I did not notice an appreciable difference compared to conventional hulls, unless you were making way head into the seas.