The green and red on some maritime clock faces


#1

I know I am showing my ignorance, can anyone tell me what the purpose of the green and red on the clock faces of the maritime clocks?
Thanks


#2

Christmas colors? Port and Starboard? Do you have a picture as I’m not able to visualize the clocks you refer to


#3

Hang on just took one, I’ll try and upload it


#4

Okay here goes


#5

Oh I just remembered we can’t post pictures anymore unless you have a URL for them…


#6

The green portion extends from the 12 to 3 minutes after the 12 and the same for the 6, and the red portion is corresponding on the 3 and 9,


#7

I may be incorrect, but I think that those times that are in the green & red are observed silence periods. Noe testing of comm equipment allowed.


#8

Isn’t that also when there’s important info sent out over VHF/SSB/SAT-C/etc.? I think Telex messages are sent out at the beginning of the hour.


#9

The Chelsea Timemaster has a silent, high precision quartz

movement specified by the U.S. Military because it meets

standards for vibration, temperature and humidity extremes.

Marked by a red band on the dial, the two 3-minute silent

periods (no signals transmitted) which must be observed by all

radio stations beginning at 15 and 45 minutes past each hour,

for the purpose of listening for any distress calls sent by

radiotelegraph (International Morse Code) at a radio frequency

of 500 kilohertz.

Marked by a green hand on the dial are again two 3-minute

silent periods (no calls transmitted) which must be observed

by all radio stations beginning at each hour and half hour,

for the purpose of listening for any distress calls sent by

radiotelephone (Voice) at a radio frequency of 2182 kilohertz.

The 4 second marks in red around the outside edge of the

minute track over which the sweep-second hand passes, enables

the radio operator to accurately transmit the 4 second alarm

signal provided by the International Telecommunications

Convention and the International Conference of Safety of Life

at Sea (SOLAS).

The dial is arranged with the conventional 12 hour numerals,

plus a secondary row of smaller hour numerals from 13 to 00,

so that direct reading of Greenwich Mean Time is clearly and

easily obtained for logging as required.

The clock has two hour hands. One of them, the black one, is

geared directly to the movement and driven by it. This “main”

hour hand is set on Greenwich Mean Time and thus the clock is

always running on and correctly indicating Greenwich Mean

Time. The other hour hand is white and is not geared directly

to the movement, but is held to and driven by the “main” hour

hand by a positive friction device, and thus is manually

movable to any point on the dial to indicate local zone time.


#10

Thank you for the enlightenment!


#11

[img]http://1.1.1.5/bmi/bellclocks.com/imageschelsea/401001160.jpg" alt=“Here’s a picture.” />


#12

Well, I was close…


#13

The green is good. It is the time I get to take my nap.
The red is bad. This is when the engine alarms go off.
Next question…


#14

“The red is bad. This is when the engine alarms go off.” and he has roll over to grab the phone next to his bunk and find someone to send below to find out why.