Sitting for 1600 GT Masters AND 3rd Mates?


#1

Well I will take my 3rds in two years now, but I’ve heard its useful to have a 1600GT Masters license as well. What other segments would I need so I could take both at once? What types of jobs should I expect to find with a 1600 masters? Thank you.


#2

Just about anything on the gulf, all your tug and ATB’s.

Granted you could sail on those vessels on your 3rd mate, but only as a mate, not as a master. In a lot of cases that can mean the difference of $100 a day.

Funny side story. I was on a 100 ton utility boats, but because we were duel classes as a utility boat and an oil recovery vessel out COI stated that we had to have two captains on board. We were in dry dock doing coast guard inspection and and only had one officer on board, so the company sent over another guy from an anchor boat that was also on dry dock. The CG looked at his license and it only said 3rd mate. The CG said no good and the paper work would not get signed untill another captain was on board, not a mate. So the company had to find somebody else to come over and sit so the the paper work could be signed and we could get back in the water. So you never know.


#3

46 CFR 15.901(a) allows a Mate 500 GRT and up to serve as Master on a vessel less than 100 GRT. Sounds like this guy was short by 1 ton (or some infintiely small portion of one ton).

As far as exams, if you have the service for Master 1600 GRT, you only take a one module “partial” exam in addition to the 3rd Mate exams. You have to take and apss all the 3rd Mate exams before you can get the partial.


#4

If you can get that 1600t you should! Get every piece of paper you can as fast as you can. You will not be able to walk out of school and into a Captain’s position, but that license will open up doors, you may end up in the right place at the right time; however you have a moral obligation to your shipmates not to command a vessel until you have the proper experience and knowledge. Remember always, A peace of paper that says captain on it doesn’t make you a captain! Good luck!


#5

[B]Title 46: Shipping
[/B]PART 15—MANNING REQUIREMENTS
Subpart H—Equivalents

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[B]§ 15.901 Inspected vessels of less than 100 gross tons.[/B]

(a) An individual holding a license as mate or pilot of inspected, self-propelled vessels of over 200 gross tons is authorized to serve as master on inspected vessels of less than 100 gross tons within any restrictions on the individual’s license.
(b) An individual holding a license authorizing service as master or mate of inspected, self-propelled vessels is authorized to serve as master or mate, respectively, of non-self-propelled vessels other than sail vessels, within any restrictions on the individual’s license.
© An individual holding a license authorizing service as master or mate of inspected, sail vessels is authorized to serve as master or mate, respectively, of other non-self-propelled vessels, within any restrictions on the individual’s license.
(d) An individual holding a license authorizing service as master or mate of inspected, auxiliary sail vessels, is authorized to serve as master or mate, respectively, of self-propelled and non-self-propelled vessels, within any restrictions on the individual’s license.
[CGD 81–059, 54 FR 150, Jan. 4, 1989]


#6

That’s what we all thought, but I’ve always been told and follow the rule that when the inspectors walk on the boat it belongs to them. You do what ever they say just to get the paper work signed so you can get back in the water. You say yes sir and call the company and let them deal with it.

The boat was classed really wired. Although we could only carry 20, we had 120 life jackets on board. I was told previously that the CG had questioned that and the office had to be called and they were on the phone for hours explaining how the boat when classed such and such could carry that many people. Like for 12 hours in an emergency situation when responding to an oil spill to take personal out to the work site.