Singapore Port


#1

Many here are familiar with the Port of Singapore.

With a thousand vessel within port limits at any given time and another few hundreds either at anchor just outside Port Limits (OPL), or passing through Singapore Strait daily without stopping, it is not an easy port to approach, or operate within.

It is also constantly changing due to reclamation and development of new facilities, as well as changing rules and regulations to go with it.

If you are heading there you would be advised to invest in these new Port Guides: http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/ukho-launches-three-new-port-approach-guides-for-singapore/


This is Singapore
#2

If you are in world wide trade I would strongly recommend getting the (currently) 4 volume [I]Guide to Port Entry[/I]. Indispensable! It is also available as an e-book for +/- $500. Just tell your agent in your next arrival message that you require a copy.


#3

Singapore port is the leading bunkering port in the world and has had it’s fair share of cheats operating in the business.
NO MORE!! MPA has taken grip on the problem and now mandate that all bunker deliveries will be utilizing Mass Flow Metering system, which is tamper free: http://www.gard.no/web/updates/content/22097384/gard-alert-singapore-new-bunkering-procedures-

No more cat and mouse game and no more deals to be made between bunker suppliers, surveyors and Chief Engineers on the take.


#4

I feel the tears and hear the weeping and wailing of Greek C/E and Captains all over the world. Stealing bunkers was their 1st world wage adjustment mechanism!


#5

Moved from Only in Norway

[QUOTE=cmakin;192230]The Coffee Shop. . . is that the one that became “very interesting” once the sun went down? I haven’t been to Singapore in many decades, and I believe that it was at or near the foot of the pier. . .[/QUOTE]

Yes that is the one. Now long gone, but Clifford Pier is still there, although no longer a landing point for seafarers.
Here is what it looked like in the mid-1970’s or so:

It is now an up-class Chinese Restaurant:


This picture is a few years old. It has been renovated and changed style since then.
The famous Clock used to hang from the rafters in the middle of the pier. It was the meeting point; “meet me under the clock” was the standard instruction.

The landing steps are still there, but now any bumboat you see is a replica, playing their trade as River Cruise boats on what is now a fresh water reservoir:

The view from Clifford Pier has also changed:

I don’t think you would recognize much if you returned today, although some of the old Singapore have been preserved, like the Fullerton Building, which housed the old General Post Office, the Marine Department and the Tax Office, among others
Here seen together with Clifford Pier back in the 70’s:

It is now the Fullerton Hotel, totally renovated but with the exterior largely preserved:


#6

Yeah, the older pictures are very much the way I remember it. Thanks.


#7

[QUOTE=cmakin;192248]Yeah, the older pictures are very much the way I remember it. Thanks.[/QUOTE]

Those were the days my friends.
Of course you could smell Singapore before you could see it in the 1960’s. Now it is squeaky clean, well organized and among the safest cities of it’s size in the world, but it was more fun then.


#8

The oldtimers on here may remember this one:

I used to get my sunglasses from the stall on the right there.

Or even more likely, this famous street:

Hilton and Ming Court Hotel in Orchard Road was built in early 1970’s:


The first McDonald’s in Singapore came in the basement of the low building on the left sometime later.


#9

This did not happen in Singapore, but a Malay Singaporean mediator solved a problem between an American and some Chinese tourists: http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/singaporean-woman-uses-multilingual-skills-to-resolve-misunderstanding-between-american
Thanks heaven for multiculturalism and multi-lingualism in Singapore.


#10

[QUOTE=ombugge;192249]but it was more fun then.[/QUOTE]

when the whores and drink cost peanuts you mean


#11

[QUOTE=ombugge;192256]This did not happen in Singapore, but a Malay Singaporean mediator solved a problem between an American and some Chinese tourists: http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/singaporean-woman-uses-multilingual-skills-to-resolve-misunderstanding-between-american
Thanks heaven for multiculturalism and multi-lingualism in Singapore.[/QUOTE]

Singapore is easily the most diverse city I have ever spent time in. And not much of a melting pot, either. I stayed near Pearl’s Hill Park, and spent most of my free time in China Town. I miss the food. Some of it. I tried to grab a bowl of peanut porrage from the alley cafe in the mornings to adapt my normal routine. But I just couldn’t learn to like it. So had bao and chysanthemum tea every morning. I have given up on finding chysanthenmum tea here. I’ve been to a couple of “bao” places over here, but its just not right. One place was selling “bao” that turned out to be tacos made with bao dough. How dare they call that bao?! There’s a new place I’m going to try: Bao Down. But I haven’t tried it yet. I don’t want to be disapointed and it looks painfully hipster. The purple ones with the yam inside, the lotus seed paste ones, so good. I’m so hungry.


#12

[QUOTE=seamanstan;192257]when the whores and drink cost peanuts you mean[/QUOTE]

Depends on your interests I presume.


#13

[QUOTE=Emrobu;192259]Singapore is easily the most diverse city I have ever spent time in. And not much of a melting pot, either. I stayed near Pearl’s Hill Park, and spent most of my free time in China Town. I miss the food. Some of it. I tried to grab a bowl of peanut porrage from the alley cafe in the mornings to adapt my normal routine. But I just couldn’t learn to like it. So had bao and chysanthemum tea every morning. I have given up on finding chysanthenmum tea here. I’ve been to a couple of “bao” places over here, but its just not right. One place was selling “bao” that turned out to be tacos made with bao dough. How dare they call that bao?! There’s a new place I’m going to try: Bao Down. But I haven’t tried it yet. I don’t want to be disapointed and it looks painfully hipster. The purple ones with the yam inside, the lotus seed paste ones, so good. I’m so hungry.[/QUOTE]

Next time in Singapore, try the “Century Egg Porridge” and “Char Siew Bao”. The Fried Dumplings in People’s Park Food Center is highly recommended. The stall next to it sells very good Frog Porraifge, if that is more to your liking. Fried Kway Teow with extra helping of cockles in Maxwell Road Market and Chicken Rice in Waterloo Street Food Court is the best in town, but you have to know which stalls to patronize.

If you are the adventurous type visiting Singapore and are looking for authentic Hawker Food in authentic settings, download this site and enjoy your choice:
http://www.cityhawkerfoodhunt.com/ci…-sg50-edition/

If you need specific tips for lunch places in a more central location, who’s better to ask then the Office Ladies working at Raffles Place?:
http://www.todayonline.com/lifestyle…-office-ladies
The famous La Pau Sat is not on this list. Maybe because it is too pricey and on the tourist brochures?

For more exotic food like wild boar, porcupine, fruit bat, barking deer, snake etc. you have to cross the causeway to JB: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4eEXzqNwRuI


#14

I found the brightly lit up, busy durian shop in China Town. I stood on the other side of the dark, quiet street and looked at it for a long time. I considered very carefully, thought about all the homesick Indonesians I had worked with, how often I had listened to them wish for durian. I thought about all the stories I’d heard about it being explicitly banned on public transit, about how everyone agrees that it smells like dirty diaper and garbage on a hot day. My adventure-loving heart beat faster as I considered the risks, considered the glory, wondered when I would every get the chance again. I found out that day a truth about myself: I am a coward.


#15

[QUOTE=Emrobu;192281]I found the brightly lit up, busy durian shop in China Town. I stood on the other side of the dark, quiet street and looked at it for a long time. I considered very carefully, thought about all the homesick Indonesians I had worked with, how often I had listened to them wish for durian. I thought about all the stories I’d heard about it being explicitly banned on public transit, about how everyone agrees that it smells like dirty diaper and garbage on a hot day. My adventure-loving heart beat faster as I considered the risks, considered the glory, wondered when I would every get the chance again. I found out that day a truth about myself: I am a coward.

[/QUOTE]

Next time pluck up your courage and try it.
As the saying goes; “It smells like hell and taste like heaven”

Actually, I don’t mind the smell and like the taste. (It is probably an acquired taste though)


#16

[QUOTE=ombugge;192293]Next time pluck up your courage and try it.
As the saying goes; “It smells like hell and taste like heaven”

Actually, I don’t mind the smell and like the taste. (It is probably an acquired taste though)[/QUOTE]

There’s durian gelato at the local 100’000’001 flavours shop. good enough, or does it have to be fresh?


#17

[QUOTE=Emrobu;192295]There’s durian gelato at the local 100’000’001 flavours shop. good enough, or does it have to be fresh?[/QUOTE]

Maybe a start, but no substitute for the REAL thing.
If you have a problem with the smell, hold your nose and eat it.
That is apparently what a lot of American voters did and it worked. (At least on one side. Too few on the other side)


#18

[QUOTE=ombugge;192300]Maybe a start, but no substitute for the REAL thing.
If you have a problem with the smell, hold your nose and eat it.
That is apparently what a lot of American voters did and it worked. (At least on one side. Too few on the other side)[/QUOTE]

They elected a durian?! I’m so surprised by these election results. Its shocking. what will happen next? How can we trust a stinky foriegn fruit with the nuclear codes? What kind of example will it be for the children? where is its birth certificate? Will it stand up for the rights of American mariners? Will the new VP be a mangosteen? Is Monsanto behind it all?


#19

[QUOTE=Emrobu;192303]They elected a durian?! I’m so surprised by these election results. Its shocking. what will happen next? How can we trust a stinky foriegn fruit with the nuclear codes? What kind of example will it be for the children? where is its birth certificate? Will it stand up for the rights of American mariners? Will the new VP be a mangosteen? Is Monsanto behind it all?[/QUOTE]

No they did NOT elect a durian!! Much worse, they elected the son of an orang utan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=izlS15orhP0


#20

Back to what is happening in Singapore Port. Two new LNG powered tugs will join the fleet of Keppel Smit Towage soon: http://www.maritimejournal.com/news101/tugs,-towing-and-salvage/two-more-lng-fuelled-tugs-on-the-way