Shell could abandon Arctic after this season


#61

http://conspiracywiki.com/articles/haarp/what-is-haarp/

http://uforeview.tripod.com/haarp.html

 http://www.conspiracies.net/the-truth-behind-the-haarp-conspiracy-fact-or-fiction/  

http://www.itsaboutthattime.net/art/devilsHAARP.html

http://www.globaltruth.net/haarp-in-action-and-its-true-purpose/


#62

Maybe HAARP is what has caused my brain to turn into the twisted mess it is today. All those years working in Alaska near the extreme ultralow frequency vibrations did it when all this time I thought it was sniffing diesel oil fumes to get low. Didjya ever sniff diesel? Get’s you so low you end up in a puddle on the floor for days at a time!


#63

Talk about meaningless victories

[B] Ruling means Shell oil rig could return to city[/B]

By Coral Garnick

A city hearing examiner cleared the way for Shell’s Polar Pioneer and other vessels to return to Terminal 5, ruling the city was not justified in demanding new land-use permits.

Royal Dutch Shell has dropped plans to continue exploratory drilling off Alaska’s North Slope, but that doesn’t mean some of its fleet of two dozen vessels won’t return to Seattle.

A city hearing examiner cleared the way for that possibility Wednesday by ruling that using the Port of Seattle’s Terminal 5 to home-port the Polar Pioneer and its support vessels was a permissible cargo-terminal use.

Deputy Hearing Examiner Anne Watanabe said the city’s attempt to require a new land-use permit relied on “inaccurate and incomplete” characterizations of the work to be done.

Foss Maritime, which leased the terminal for two years to service Shell’s huge Polar Pioneer oil rig and related ships, said it is “awaiting decisions on which vessels will be returning to Puget Sound and where they will be moored.”

Shell spokesman Curtis Smith said in a statement the company is “now safely and methodically demobilizing” its fleet after the summer-drilling season in the Chukchi Sea. “How that will impact Seattle in terms of potential future asset staging has yet to be decided.”

The company announced Sunday it is abandoning the drilling effort in Alaska “for the foreseeable future,” citing the disappointing results of an initial well, the high costs of development and the “challenging and unpredictable federal regulatory environment in offshore Alaska.”

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray said he was disappointed in Wednesday’s ruling. But he added in a statement that “Now is the time for us to come together to collaborate on new projects to support the growth of maritime jobs while protecting our natural environment.”

Since January, when Foss announced its plan to lease part of Terminal 5 to Shell, environmentalists and Seattle officials had opposed using Seattle as a home base for Shell’s Arctic-drilling exploration.

The oil rig Polar Pioneer was moored in Seattle for a month and sparked multiple protests.

Murray said in May the Port needed a new land-use permit because the existing permit allowed only for cargo loading and unloading — not for maintaining and supplying oil-drilling rigs. Foss and the Port quickly appealed, and the questions of what is a cargo terminal and what is cargo have been debated ever since.

The examiner heard four days of testimony last month. During the first day of the hearing, city land-use planner supervisor Andrew McKim, the primary author of the department’s decision, was grilled for four hours.

The city, and a coalition of environmental groups that joined the case on the city’s side, argued that Foss’ activities at Terminal 5 did not meet the definition of a cargo terminal and a narrow definition of cargo, goods and containers.

The Port and Foss argued that restricting the use of the terminal according to the city’s rationale “would fundamentally change the operation of cargo terminals and cripple the Port of Seattle as a competitive commercial-cargo enterprise.”

Department of Planning and Development spokesman Bryan Stevens said the department will now retract the notice of violation issued for Terminal 5 in May, which could have fined the Port, Foss and Shell up to $500 a day if the Polar Pioneer or its support ship, the Aiviq, returned to the terminal.

The city considers the hearing examiner’s ruling final and will not appeal.

Earthjustice attorney Patti Goldman, who represents the coalition of environmental groups who joined the case on the city’s side, said she and her clients are still reviewing the ruling, but they are “seriously considering appealing.”

“We thought the city was right … home-porting a massive drill rig is not a use of a cargo terminal,” she said.

Foss, the Port and maritime companies had worried that the city’s ruling would amount to a closed-for-business sign as the Seattle and Tacoma ports are trying to strengthen their global competitiveness by forming The Northwest Seaport Alliance.

“The ruling is an encouraging sign that Seattle will continue to welcome the maritime industry,” Foss spokesman Paul Queary said in a statement.


#64

I heard a Rumor that EXXON / Mobil are thinking of giving it a try next year.

Now, I have know way of proving this and my source has been wrong before but he seems to be pretty sure and he is in a position to know.

As others has said I want to see someone hit it big up there.


#65

didn’t even know that they held any offshore lease blocks in the Arctic…but if they do then I’ll bet they can get one hell of a deal from Shell to use the AIVIQ.

Still, I can’t believe there is anyone at all in this low price environment who would even contemplate trying after witnessing Shell’s slowmotion 7 year long $7B trainwreck.

As others has said I want to see someone hit it big up there.

someday, someone will but we’ll be either very old men by that time (should any of us be so unlucky to live to such an age) or we’ll be nothing more than ashes


#66

No point in anyone going to the Alaskan Arctic (whatever the oil price) without a federal regulatory approach that encourages responsible and efficient exploration.


#67

They could try once more with the Russians maybe but would have to bring in the rig again. Though small chance the sanctions will be lifted by then.

Only other option could be the Canadian Arctic but I thought they pulled out of there with Imperial.


#68

I remember them backing out of their JV with Rosneft in December last year because of the sanctions and cannot see any way they would go back there now? Even if they held blocks in the Alaskan Arctic, there is no way in hell anyone is going to go there now what Shell admitted defeat and is leaving like they are. My thoughts regarding the Alaskan Arctic now would be much more towards continuing with landbased exploration which if significant plays were found could be tied back to Prudhoe Bay for far less than the Chukchi ever could. Even the Beaufort Sea would be easier to put into production but that is again going to be a very long time before we would ever see anything happen there.

Only other option could be the Canadian Arctic but I thought they pulled out of there with Imperial.

again, not with these low prices for crude


#69

hey buddy, you’re right. No sense in continuing to explain your logic. The U.S. Arctic, unfortunately, is done for now.


#70

[QUOTE=z-drive;169778]hey buddy, you’re right. No sense in continuing to explain your logic. The U.S. Arctic, unfortunately, is done for now.[/QUOTE]

and what’s yer pernt?


#71

Sorry, I can’t understand your vermont accent. explain


#72

If MarineTraffic is correct, it looks like the Discoverer has left the Burger Prospect. Along with the other blue asset Aiviq.


#73

Shell’s Arctic rigs will be heading back south. Probably the last time they’ll make this journey.

[B]Shell’s Arctic drill rigs make final Alaska stop
[/B]
ADN - Laurel Andrews
October 12, 2015

Two weeks after announcing the end of its Arctic offshore oil exploration program, Royal Dutch Shell’s Noble Discoverer drillship left Dutch Harbor Monday afternoon, the last planned stop in Alaska as it heads to the Pacific Northwest.

The company’s second drilling rig that had arrived in Alaska this summer, the Transocean Polar Pioneer, is close behind.

The Noble Discoverer arrived in Dutch Harbor Sunday, said Shell Alaska spokesperson Megan Baldino. During the stop, both rigs had a crew change and resupply of fuel and groceries.

The rigs are “the heart of the program,” Baldino said, and with their departure, most of Shell’s 28-vessel fleet that was mobilized for exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea has also left the site.

In late September, Shell announced it was ceasing exploration in Arctic waters after disappointing results from an exploratory well. The company had spent more than $7 billion on Arctic offshore exploration, including $2.1 billion for leases in the Chukchi Sea.

On Monday there were a “half-dozen assets remaining" in the Arctic, Baldino said, “but they’re all winding down.”

While in Dutch Harbor, the Noble Discoverer received an annual inspection and was found to be “free to sail,” said Jon Cotton, chief warrant officer with the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Detachment there.

The Polar Pioneer had previously been inspected in Dutch Harbor before heading up to the Chukchi Sea, Cotton said. That inspection took place in July, according to the Coast Guard’s Port State Information Exchange.

Shell did not request any safety zones – which put a buffer in place around the ships – for the trip to the Pacific Northwest, Cotton said. This summer, protesters in Washington state were detained and issued citations for violating the safety zones around the Polar Pioneer as the rig headed north.

This summer was the first time the Noble Discoverer had returned to Alaska since 2013, after it was found to be liable for environmental and safety violations that led to a $12.2 million plea deal in federal court by its owner-operator Noble Drilling LLC. The plea deal covered violations related to the operation of the Noble Discoverer and the drillship Kulluk, which was wrecked after it broke free from a tow in the Gulf of Alaska during bad weather and ran aground south of Kodiak Island in December 2012.

When asked what route the rigs will be taking to reach the Pacific Northwest, Baldino said “we’re going to take the safest route possible,” and there were no “predetermined timelines” for the vessels’ arrival.

The Noble Discoverer is heading to the Port of Everett, Washington, where it will be offloading equipment. The rig will then continue to another site that “has yet to be determined,” Baldino said.

Once the Polar Pioneer leaves Dutch Harbor, it will head to Port Angeles, Washington, to offload equipment. The rig is expected to leave Dutch Harbor “in the next day or two,” Baldino said.

http://www.adn.com/article/20151012/shell-s-arctic-drill-rigs-make-final-alaska-stop


#74

Anybody know if Shell is committed to a long term contract on Polar Pioneer, or will she be released back to Transocean?
That rig has spent more than a year preparing for this short drilling campaign and nearly circumnavigated the glob in the process.
Although not a newbuilding she is still in good condition and well equipped with modern drilling equipment and fully enclosed piperack, drillfloor and derrick. You could work on the drillfloor in t-shirt and shorts in the arctic, if it wasn’t for HSE rules.

She was the first Offshore rig purpose-built for arctic operation and has spent many winters in the Barents Sea off Northern Norway.
I was involved with planning her first drilling operation near Bear Island back in 1989/90, incl. the Oil Spill Response Plan.
It would be a shame to take her to drill in West Africa or something.


#75

In the meantime, Sea-web reports that the keel has been laid for “LA SHIP 304” (IMO 9788368)…


#76

Is that one of the new “baby Aiviks?” Or the twin to Ulstein Yno 302 “Island Venture?”


#77

[QUOTE=ombugge;171698]Anybody know if Shell is committed to a long term contract on Polar Pioneer, or will she be released back to Transocean?
That rig has spent more than a year preparing for this short drilling campaign and nearly circumnavigated the glob in the process.
Although not a newbuilding she is still in good condition and well equipped with modern drilling equipment and fully enclosed piperack, drillfloor and derrick. You could work on the drillfloor in t-shirt and shorts in the arctic, if it wasn’t for HSE rules.

She was the first Offshore rig purpose-built for arctic operation and has spent many winters in the Barents Sea off Northern Norway.
I was involved with planning her first drilling operation near Bear Island back in 1989/90, incl. the Oil Spill Response Plan.
It would be a shame to take her to drill in West Africa or something.[/QUOTE]

Looking at the fate of Transocean and its rigs I wouldn’t hold my breath. If they don’t find work for her in the short-term I assume she may be coldstacked in a cheap location.


#78

[QUOTE=ombugge;171698]Anybody know if Shell is committed to a long term contract on Polar Pioneer, or will she be released back to Transocean?
That rig has spent more than a year preparing for this short drilling campaign and nearly circumnavigated the glob in the process.
Although not a newbuilding she is still in good condition and well equipped with modern drilling equipment and fully enclosed piperack, drillfloor and derrick. You could work on the drillfloor in t-shirt and shorts in the arctic, if it wasn’t for HSE rules.

She was the first Offshore rig purpose-built for arctic operation and has spent many winters in the Barents Sea off Northern Norway.
I was involved with planning her first drilling operation near Bear Island back in 1989/90, incl. the Oil Spill Response Plan.
It would be a shame to take her to drill in West Africa or something.[/QUOTE]

I think there was something posted earlier that she was only on charter until October of this year. No idea condition of that rig, they did have a rough go of it with their initial USCG COC before heading up to the Arctic, after Shell spent a ton on upgrades to her in Singapore. I agree with DrillBill, most likely fate of those two rigs is coldstack


#79

[QUOTE=The Commodore;171728]I think there was something posted earlier that she was only on charter until October of this year. No idea condition of that rig, they did have a rough go of it with their initial USCG COC before heading up to the Arctic, after Shell spent a ton on upgrades to her in Singapore. I agree with DrillBill, most likely fate of those two rigs is coldstack[/QUOTE]

Wasn’t it the Noble Discoverer that had most problems? The Polar Pioneer was working in Norwegian waters, much of it in the north, all the time since new and until she was taken to Singapore for upgrade. Norwegian requirements are not exactly known to be lacks when it comes to safety.

PS> I saw both rigs here in Singapore during upgrade.


#80

[QUOTE=jbtam99;171720]Is that one of the new “baby Aiviks?” Or the twin to Ulstein Yno 302 “Island Venture?”[/QUOTE]

There wasn’t much information, but with over 20 MW diesel-electric power plant and two azimuth thrusters I’m pretty sure it’s one of the two Polar Class 3 AHTS vessels Edison Chouest is building.

I wouldn’t call it a “baby Aiviq”. In terms of icegoing capability, it’s probably better than the older vessel.