Seriously...what could a person do with an old US Coast Guard icebreaker?


#1

USCGC STORIS (WMEC-38) on the block at GSA Auctions

I mean is there any conceivable use for such a vessel? I guess the folks who wanted her to be a museum were not able to get their plan together? I know for the government to donate a vessel to a non for profit, they have to see so much cash in the bank first. I think in the case for STORIS it was $200k which should have been doable one would think but we know that the group trying to save GLACIER fell on their face and the ship went to Brownsville.


#2

Maybe sea Shepard will snatch her up!


#3

Go broke, quickly.


#4

now there’s a 120’ Torpedo Retriever in San Diego

Now there’s a vessel somebody could put to a good use…too bad I am broke!


#5

[QUOTE=c.captain;112255]USCGC STORIS (WMEC-38) on the block at GSA Auctions

I mean is there any conceivable use for such a vessel?[/QUOTE]

Ask Gilette; bet they could find a great use!

The CG is notorious for not taking care of their own vessels. I don’t think I’d chance it regardless of price.


#6

Do you get to keep her 25mm Bushmaster? :wink:


#7

About 15 years ago there were a few USCG bouy tenders up for sale / govt transfer ). I went aboard one (buttonwood?) I thought it was in pretty good shape. Anyone know of one privately owned?


#8

[QUOTE=salt’n steel;112602]About 15 years ago there were a few USCG bouy tenders up for sale / govt transfer ). I went aboard one (buttonwood?) I thought it was in pretty good shape. Anyone know of one privately owned?[/QUOTE]

The Job Corp school at Tongue Point in Astoria has one and my recollection of it before they got it was that it was immaculate. I remember is sitting at Coastal Transportation’s dock for awhile.

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[QUOTE=john;112584]Do you get to keep her 25mm Bushmaster? ;)[/QUOTE]

…must be the STORIS you’re referring to and she probably had several along with 50cal Brownings as well.


#9

[QUOTE=salt’n steel;112602]About 15 years ago there were a few USCG bouy tenders up for sale / govt transfer ). I went aboard one (buttonwood?) I thought it was in pretty good shape. Anyone know of one privately owned?[/QUOTE]

A couple years ago a restaurant guy in Wisconsin bought an ice breaker that was too big to take out through the locks. He bought it from a museum that could not afford to keep her for just $100,000. The say she was in excellent condition.

About five years ago a bouy tender was sold in Baltimore to guy that planned to use it as a fuel station in the Bahamas. I think it sold for around $300,000.


#10

for a long time Marcon had a 180 bouytender for sale which was in Lake Huron I believe and had been in fresh water its whole life. Price was only $200k.


#11

[QUOTE=salt’n steel;112602]Anyone know of one privately owned?[/QUOTE]

Jeff Foster of Jeff Foster Trucking, Superior, WI, ended up purchasing the 180’ USCGC Sundew, and it is in the Duluth/Superior harbor. Interesting that it is there, as it was built in Duluth, MN.

They have a Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sundew-US-Coast-Guard-Cutter-WLB-404/174843601019

And an article: http://www.northlandsnewscenter.com/news/education/Retired-Cutter-Sundew-Still-Trains-New-Sailors-In-Duluth-125725133.html

Similar class USCGCs Sweetbrier and Woodrush are now part of the Ghana navy.


#12

[QUOTE=salt’n steel;112602]About 15 years ago there were a few USCG bouy tenders up for sale / govt transfer ). I went aboard one (buttonwood?) I thought it was in pretty good shape. Anyone know of one privately owned?[/QUOTE]

Maybe, but you should have been around for all the lulz when the Philippine Navy bought ex-DALLAS. A gazillion yuks a minute


#13

The CG has an interesting history of donating the things.

I remember seeing one docked at Colon around 2000 waiting for a convoy. Story is it had been donated to a non-profit in California.


#14

I’ve always liked the look of the RELIANCE class medium endurance cutters but when I ever see one up close the shell plating always appears to be badly washboarded like they are built of some very thin steel. Anyone here have any direct experience serving on these vessels?

One thing for sure is that with budgets being what they are, the USCG won’t be disposing of any more of these anytime soon.


#15

[QUOTE=Steamer;112622]The CG has an interesting history of donating the things.

I remember seeing one docked at Colon around 2000 waiting for a convoy. Story is it had been donated to a non-profit in California.[/QUOTE]

Friendships in Lake Charles has two of the ex 180’ers which they use for humanitarian missions.

They changed their website and it doesn’t highlight their vessels but they used to have one of my old ships, the very antique MV PEMBINA but sadly something happened where they couldn’t use her anymore and sold her for scrap. She got cut up at ESCO about two years ago very sadly because to my knowledge she as the last all original C1-M-AV1 still surviving.

I see they also have a cadet program now which is interesting but I imagine very heavily steeped in religion which is unfortunate yet I wonder if the graduates get valid seatime for completing the program?


#16

I turned down a job on the Pembina many years ago. They were hauling old ammo as I recall. A friend took the job and said it was truly an experience.

The last time I saw the thing it was sitting at the Coastal dock waiting to be called for a higher (and tax exempt) cause … I think you are right about the last uncut example, it still had the gun tubs. I took a bunch of photos, will have to look for them.


#17

I believe she and the Evergreen were used extensively for oceanographic research. That can be a bit of challenge in this day and age. I’m pretty sure she’s single screw, and diesel electric at that. Spare parts for the drive might be problematic.


#18

[QUOTE=Steamer;112635]I turned down a job on the Pembina many years ago. They were hauling old ammo as I recall. A friend took the job and said it was truly an experience.

The last time I saw the thing it was sitting at the Coastal dock waiting to be called for a higher (and tax exempt) cause … I think you are right about the last uncut example, it still had the gun tubs. I took a bunch of photos, will have to look for them.[/QUOTE]

Hell she was a blast to work on (pun intended!) Pay abysmally low, living conditions appalling, machinery which barely ran but getting to spend weeks on end in West Loch watching the Navee load and unload bombs at a slug’s pace. Once I have 5 weeks there so bought a $300 Ford Fairmont up at Waipahu that was more rust than steel and drank heavily the whole time from the Kona side of Oahu to the Ewa. Nobody gave a shit about anything on there. Loaded the car on the #3 hatch when it was time to leave in a ratty old cargo net and then used it to drink heavily in Alameda and Oakland. Ester’s Orbit Lounge was a favorite of ours! Ah memories of seafaring long past and gone into the mists of happier, albeit much lower paying times.


#19

Never sailed on 'em, but I am intimately familiar with them. The Reliance class underwent a major service life extension in the late '80s-early '90s. The hull plating was replaced to meet original mil-spec. The entire interior was completely stripped out, right down to the keel. The engine room, electrical, piping, quarters, everything was replaced brand new. They used to have stern exhaust, but as you can see in the picture, that too was replaced. One of the reasons they always looked stoved in, was that they were regularly sent out on search and rescue in the shittiest sea conditions… but always came back.


#20

[QUOTE=c.captain;112638]Hell she was a blast to work on (pun intended!)…[/QUOTE]

I sometimes get a little twinge and wonder about not taking that job. I kind of look at it like sailing on the OP, one of those things you just have to do because there isn’t anything else like it in the world and no matter how miserable it might have been I wouldn’t trade the experience for anything … not that I care to repeat it anytime soon.