Seamanship and Work Ethic in the GOM


#1

<br>My experience has been in deep sea shipping and the navy. <br> I have known what it is to work with some sharp, knowledgeable sailors.<br> Now I am working for the first time in the GOM. And I’m suffering from culture shock.<br><br>Where I work, nobody gives a rat’s butt about professional <br>seamanship, and work avoidance is given the highest priority.<br><br>So tell me, where in the GOM are the motivated, squared-away sailors working? <br>On anchor handling vessels, large OSVs, ROV vessels, tugs? <br> With Chouest, Hornbeck, Oceaneering? <br> <br>Please pass the word. I’d like to work with the best.<br><br>


#2

Come join the Bridge Team on drillship or self-propelled semi. I came from an OSV to a rig. I miss the boat handling but as a mate I have a lot more responsibility on here. My paint budget alone is $550k and


#3

mate on watch - Unfortunately, I found that many, not all look at this as a job and not a career. Big difference between the 2. It is amazing that these indiviuals are making $250+ and they get “bent” out of shape when you expect them to do their job.
Orniphobe - Any leads on employment on a drillship or semi with a 1600t Master NC license & DPO Unlimited?


#4

Capt Brian, after 13 years at ECO, I am heading toward the drillships. I have been in the Gov’t divison the wole time here. I have been offered and accepted a Master’s position with a drilling company on one of their drillships. There are a few of us long timers here that have/will be departing soon.
I recently read that Diamond Offshore was looking for a DPO.
I know next year, Noble has a Semi Submersible that is coming out that will be a DP rig. They will be looking for DPO’s then, if not before.
I don’t know if those company’s want you to have an U/L licenses or just having the DPO certificate is enough.
Good Luck


#5

Capt Rob - Why the apparent mass exodus at ECO? How was the Gov’t Div? Thank you for the info, I realize that I need to get off my wallet and upgrade ASAP.


#6

I’m still trying to correlate more responsibility being relative to the paint budget on a drillship versus an OSV.?! New one on me.


#7

Equal time off without losing any income.
I worked 300 days last year take this boat out (OPDS). I was offered the same money (really more) I made last year, working only 6 months (28 and 28). Better benefits (401K is better) and better hospitalzation. I know the people who left, it was basically the same (equal or more money and time off).
I have been in the Gov’t Division all my time. Started off on the MSC side (Cory Chouest) and then went to ice breakers for 10 years (NB Palmler and LM Gould), and then I been on here since the shipyard (last March).
Gov’t Division is nice. When you’re at the dock, you can get off the boat, go to town and have dinner as that. It is not the same as the oil patch as working out of Fourchon. Normally when people transfer to the Gov’t Division, they don’t transfer back to the oilfield side.
Getting in this division is pretty much the same as everywhere else, “timing”. Right time, right place. You got guys who have been waiting to get here, that are still waiting, and then all of a sudden, you get a dipsh%t new hire that shows up, who you are ready to run off after 2 days on the boat.


#8

Capt Brain,
Absolutely! Visit www.deepwater.com . The DP training plus supply boat experience is huge. DP is is team sport, it takes a good mix of experience, big ship mates, supply boat mates, drill floor types, and hawsepipers. On a semi you’ll be moving water, barite, and cement around which you’re used to.
I know of at least one 1600gt master that Transocean paid for his Third Mate classes. That going to depend on the rig manager though, each one is it’s own business entity.


#9

If you find it please let me know. Last year after serving for 3 years as a master of a large offshore tug with a petroleum barge at a very large company. I was terminated along with a few others. We had the audacity to ask to have repairs made to our vessels. Little things like steering and fire alarms. I blame myself, if I would have followed the norm and not said a thing I would still have that job. But with any sea story there is always more that meets the eye. Myself along with another captain had the nasty habit of filling out all the required forms and e-mailing them to the appropriate person(s). The Peter Principal is at work today. (“in every hierarchy each individual rises to their own level of incompetence and then remains there” if you buck it you will lose.
So I find this nice little Relief Captains spot at a small company in the GOM and I thought I had it made. I could go on and on about the stupid, lazy, incompetence that I have observed but I’m sure you have been there. So I try to find humor where I can. Such as this.
Yesterday I was asked to put the grocery order into the computer for the head “Captain”. I get to a item numbered #64 Saltine Crackers and written in a somewhat legible script is P-L-A-C-E.
Not knowing what is meant here I ask “Hey Capt. these crackers here that you want, Yeah, the saltines, Is this a brand name?” He says "No I was askin fo them nice"
Still not sure what he means I ask again “Capt. I don’t know what you mean”. He gets all upset and says "Man you stupit or sumthin can’t you read, I askin nice you know PLEASE,juno, P-L-A-C-E.
I am going to start looking for a new job today.


#10

What your Daddy does?