Oil Record Book


#1

This question is for any engineers working in the Gulf of Mexico onboard an OSV(Offshore Supply Vessel).

How do you log fuel transfers in your Oil Record Book?

Specifically, how do you log bunkering fuel and how do you log fuel pumped to a rig, drillship, vessel, or shoreside facility?

Thanks for any responses.


#2

Oh, this ought to be good.


#3

Use “I”, incidental. To vessel/rig, dates, times, location, amounts and [U]from[/U] which tanks.

Recently audited and passed with flying colors.

Time starts when PICs first meet and ends when paperwork is completed, not pumping times.


#4

I use P for platform, S for shrimp boat. East as that


#5

I use P for platform and VC for shrimp boats


#6

Thanks for the info, guys.
Are you logging it in Book I or Book II, and what are the specific codes you are using?
Do you ever use Part II coding?
Do you use Part I -“H” for bunkering?

here is an Oil Record book:
http://74.125.113.132/search?q=cache:qyAm9XbYVN4J:209.183.230.59/forms/upload/ORB_Instructions1.doc+oil+record+book+partI&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us


#7

500 ton ATB.

Book l…Machinery space operations (circle that on each page).

H 26.1 +.2 + .3 (+.4 for lube oil) for bunkering. Instructions say be consistent in measurements (I use gallons).

Use “I” for transfers to vessel or rig with same info.

We are required to make weekly entries for Dirty Oil tank, use C.1 +.2 +.3

We have an OWS and test it monthly, also listed under “I” if there are no problems.

Captain signs only/all those operations conducted while he was aboard, not the Chief. Line through blank lines and put “No More Entries This Page”.

The examples in the front of the book have some mistakes, be careful and go by the instructions, not the examples.

Hope this helps.


#8

[quote=seadog!;19309]500 ton ATB.

Book l…Machinery space operations (circle that on each page).

H 26.1 +.2 + .3 (+.4 for lube oil) for bunkering. Instructions say be consistent in measurements (I use gallons).

Use “I” for transfers to vessel or rig with same info.

We are required to make weekly entries for Dirty Oil tank, use C.1 +.2 +.3

We have an OWS and test it monthly, also listed under “I” if there are no problems.

Captain signs only/all those operations conducted while he was aboard, not the Chief. Line through blank lines and put “No More Entries This Page”.

The examples in the front of the book have some mistakes, be careful and go by the instructions, not the examples.

Hope this helps.[/quote]

The only constant in the pre-audits and audits I’ve endured the last 7 years is the lack of consistancy. This CYA paperwork was a motivation for my early retirement.

Our op and entrys were similar except all bunkers received and xfered were under H. All auditors agreed amounts could be any standard unit of measure, gal, liters, tons, ect as long as they were consistant.

The person in charge of the transfer signed off on the op. The Master signed the bottom of the page when filled. At the end of the hitch, the Master crossed off the unused page and signed the bottom of the page.

Slops were logged weekly under C and any OCM and OWS tests, failures and inspections are logged under I.


#9

“The person in charge of the transfer signed off on the op. The Master signed the bottom of the page when filled. At the end of the hitch, the Master crossed off the unused page and signed the bottom of the page.”

That’s what I meant. Only you said it more clearly!

The ORB clearly says bunkering (H) is “adding” fuel or lube.


#10

[quote=seadog!;19309]500 ton ATB.

Book l…Machinery space operations (circle that on each page).

H 26.1 +.2 + .3 (+.4 for lube oil) for bunkering. Instructions say be consistent in measurements (I use gallons).

Use “I” for transfers to vessel or rig with same info.

We are required to make weekly entries for Dirty Oil tank, use C.1 +.2 +.3

We have an OWS and test it monthly, also listed under “I” if there are no problems.

Captain signs only/all those operations conducted while he was aboard, not the Chief. Line through blank lines and put “No More Entries This Page”.

The examples in the front of the book have some mistakes, be careful and go by the instructions, not the examples.

Hope this helps.[/quote]
This sounds reasonable, Seadog.

I was recently in conflict with our company’s ISM manager who changed the way all the company’s vessels were operating. We had always used Book II, and logged fuel transfers using codes A(loading), B(internal transfer), and C(unloading) for fuel and lube oil, and Book I for OWS, dirty oil, etc. We had been through many USCG inspections with this. The only thing they had ever told us was that we were not required to log daily fuel transfers to the Day Tanks using Part II “B”(internal transfer), .

The change ordered by the ISM guy was for us to stop using Book II altogether, and to log fuel [B]loading[/B] under Book I “H”, but to also log fuel [B]O[B]FFLOADING[/B][/B] under code “H”. I did not agree with that, and was only told that an unnamed ABS guy had said it was OK. I was not given any reason why the change was instituted, only that we “are not a tanker”.

As you mentioned, Seadog, “H” is coding which only applies to “adding” fuel(bunkering).

After I was terminated, I went to the USCG and asked them what they required for a new OSV.

Here is what they told me:

The USCG man also told me verbally that he was [U][B]not[/B][/U] in agreement with my former company’s request to log fuel [B]offloading[/B] using code H(bunkering). He also mentioned that in case of a marine incident, the USCG would be looking to discover exactly how much fuel was onboard.

In a subsequent job interview, I was told by the E-Chouest ISM man that they do not require logging of fuel unloading at all.

Your method of logging fuel transfers off the vessel under “I” seems reasonable. It does create an auditable record of fuel which came onboard, and where it went when pumped off. The only exception is that it doesn’t account for what was consumed.

Our prior method, using Book II, “A”, “B” and “C”, accounted for all fuel transfers on/off/consumed to create a complete and auditable record of all fuel movements and a final amount held onboard. Whenever we made a sounding, we also would record that on the day’s internal transfer and say “corrected by sounding”.

So, I am curious how other companies are doing things.


#11

Bluejay-
At the end of every bunkering op “H”, or transfer “I”, I put Total ROB (Remaining On Board). Simple math gives you what was consumed in the interim.


#12

When I was with Chouest we didn’t use Book II because “We aren’t a tanker”. We logged it in the ORB as negative bunkering with the receipt from the meter stapled in the book.


#13

I’m taking a Transport Canada simulator exam tomorrow. Correct entries in the ORB are part of it. We have time after the simulation ends to do the paperwork. So I came up with a note-taking scheme to use: quick and simple during the simulation that should capture the relevant data. I was thinking about the struggles that my First Engineers have faced trying to maintain an accurate record when some of the events are happening when they are not on watch and by other people throughout the day. Seems like they are always haranguing us to get them the data that they need. But since most of us have never had to do the ORB ourselves, we (I) don’t always have a clear understanding of what is needed. I went through the Canadian guidelines, to prepare my data sheet, and this is what I came up with:

I reckon that something like this could be put up on a whiteboard or on a laminated sheet for people to write over the course of the watch so that the person who writes the book gets all the data captured in one place.

Time, tank, level, method, position, and speed are self explanatory, T/R/A/M is Transferred, Retained, Automatic, Manual; Fa/Fi/Fu is Failed, Fixed, or Fuckup; and Comment is a place to say type of oil, reason, or what-have-you.

question is: do you all think this is useful in a real situation? Do you use something like this?


#14

any info could be useful… or a liability !!, I strictly conformed to the orb entries and unless it’s been changed probably never used more than 3 designators with fuel xfer to ship alongside being the more rare.


#15

Why do you think this could be a liability?


#16

a erroneous entry could be.


#17

Usually it is the person doing the process that makes the entry and signs for it. as chief, I won’t make an entry or sign an entry that I didn’t perform. I will help the person make the entry but that is all.


#18

That’s not been my experience. We have just the one responsible adult who makes the entries and the rest of us do the stuff that requires reporting. Except the OWS, that’s the same responsible adult.


#19

Didn’t know such individuals were allowed on board. . . .


#20

How common is it to get into legal trouble with with ORB? That is the ORB alone without related problems such as illegal pumping, magic pipe or the like?