Offshore Wind Farms


#61

I fully expect Offshore Wind Farms will be developed on a greater scale in the future but not until the building of land based farms/fields has run it course. As long as it is easier and cheaper to construct prime land based Wind Generation, Offshore development will lag.


#62

[QUOTE=Chief Seadog;196063]I fully expect Offshore Wind Farms will be developed on a greater scale in the future but not until the building of land based farms/fields has run it course. As long as it is easier and cheaper to construct prime land based Wind Generation, Offshore development will lag.[/QUOTE]

It’s logical to follow the path of least resistance in financial terms; the same pattern as drilling for oil. As long as fracking on land is cheaper and more easily accessible areas are being discovered…


#63

[QUOTE=Chief Seadog;196063]I fully expect Offshore Wind Farms will be developed on a greater scale in the future but not until the building of land based farms/fields has run it course. As long as it is easier and cheaper to construct prime land based Wind Generation, Offshore development will lag.[/QUOTE]

Easier to construct but not as efficient in operation = less income over the 20-30 years life of the Wind farm.


#64

The main reason they are looking at offshore wind in the US is that there is too much opposition to onshore wind locations from the NIMBYs (Not In My Backyard).


#65

[QUOTE=Chief Seadog;196063]I fully expect Offshore Wind Farms will be developed on a greater scale in the future but not until the building of land based farms/fields has run it course. As long as it is easier and cheaper to construct prime land based Wind Generation, Offshore development will lag.[/QUOTE]

The companies that has shown interest in Offshore Wind Farms in the US has experience from developing such facilities in NW Europe and even in deep waters. The cost of offshore construction is coming down and the efficiency of the turbines are increasing, thus making the better regularity and higher average wind force offshore a major factor in deciding where to build.
Saving some on construction, but loosing efficiency throughout the life of the Wind Farm is “penny wise but $$$ foolish”.

Besides, the cost of land, the amount of permits, local regulations and the NIMBY problem, is a major factor in the decision.


#66

[QUOTE=ombugge;196049]The wind is blowing, the technology to build and install wind mills in deeper and deeper waters is there and the money to do so is available: http://gcaptain.com/wind-power-blows-through-nuclear-coal-as-costs-drop-at-sea/

What is holding the US back from joining the club??
One answer to that may be; There is no American technology, equipment and know-how available yet.
Besides, Trump don’t like Offshore wind mills that can be seen from his golf courses.[/QUOTE]

Well, considering the lead times in getting any offshore installations going, putting this on Trump is a bit lame. . . .


#67

[QUOTE=cmakin;196126]Well, considering the lead times in getting any offshore installations going, putting this on Trump is a bit lame. . . .[/QUOTE]

Are you talking about the time to get the necessary permits to install, or the time from permit is granted until “first wind”? to put it that way?
Trump will definitely have an influence, directly or indirectly, on the first one already. He has no influence on the last.
Question is if he will remain in power long enough to make any real difference?

BTW the lead time for wind farm construction is a lot shorter than for oil & gas installations in most cases.


#68

[QUOTE=ombugge;196151]Are you talking about the time to get the necessary permits to install, or the time from permit is granted until “first wind”? to put it that way?
Trump will definitely have an influence, directly or indirectly, on the first one already. He has no influence on the last.
Question is if he will remain in power long enough to make any real difference?

BTW the lead time for wind farm construction is a lot shorter than for oil & gas installations in most cases.[/QUOTE]

But certainly longer than 90 days. . .


#69

[QUOTE=cmakin;196158]But certainly longer than 90 days. . .[/QUOTE]

Wishful thinking!! He is likely to last out his first 100 days. How much longer is anybodies guess.


#70

[QUOTE=ombugge;196090]The companies that has shown interest in Offshore Wind Farms in the US has experience from developing such facilities in NW Europe and even in deep waters. The cost of offshore construction is coming down and the efficiency of the turbines are increasing, thus making the better regularity and higher average wind force offshore a major factor in deciding where to build.
Saving some on construction, but loosing efficiency throughout the life of the Wind Farm is “penny wise but $$$ foolish”.

Besides, the cost of land, the amount of permits, local regulations and the NIMBY problem, is a major factor in the decision.[/QUOTE]

Texas has the most wind farms in the U.S. The coastal plains and northern plains have the most constant winds. The windmills are on farms and pasture. The average life of the windmill is 20 years and break-even is 24 years with the current subsidies.


#71

A new Cable Layer for the Offshore Wind Farm industry worldwide is doing her trials before delivery to her Owners and Charterers soon: http://www.smp.no/naeringsliv/2017/03/20/Milliardskip-på-prøvetur-med-nye-farger-14474877.ece#cxrecs_s

Here is more details on this vessels: https://www.google.com.sg/search?q=306+CLV-design+fra+Salt+Ship+Design&rlz=1C1DIMA_enNO726NO726&tbm=isch&imgil=z4FzQgpN2i9toM%3A%3BpazI4n76iWGb1M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.ship-technology.com%252Fprojects%252Fabbs-140m-advanced-cable-laying-vessel%252F&source=iu&pf=m&fir=z4FzQgpN2i9toM%3A%2CpazI4n76iWGb1M%2C_&usg=__vdIaYr4u192cuiikCj-IHDSqdxA%3D&biw=1189&bih=599&ved=0ahUKEwj1_qbPjOfSAhUHq48KHbF3DJ0QyjcIPQ&ei=cdnQWLWCFYfWvgSx77HoCQ#imgrc=bRnaMWwMFC7OCM:

Maybe she will show up at an Offshore Wind Farm near you sometime in the future???


#72

Offshore Tidal power generation has been mentioned earlier. Here is another concept being tested off Scotland. It has hit peak power: http://www.scotrenewables.com/news/100-press-release-the-world-s-most-powerful-tidal-turbine-hits-peak-power
Something for Main, or Alaska?


#73

What about Wave Power Buoys off Hawaii, or for small villages in the Aleutians?: https://www.waves4power.com/
The prototype is ready to go back on location near Runde, Norway after repairs and upgrading at Ulstein Shipyard: http://www.smp.no/pluss/2017/04/16/Gjer-nytt-forsøk-med-bølgjekraftverket-på-Runde-14596646.ece?cx_front_click=baseline_test&cx_front_click_place=5&cx_front_click_articles=4


#74

I was on a relief job in Hawaii in 1980. I remember a wave riding buoy on the Kona Coast they were experimenting with.The technology today would be a little more promising.


#75

First Unsubsidised offshore wind farm. Onshore wind cheaper than coal, now, and the price is locked in for 20 years…

Easy, there Fraq, there’s a new invention called electricity. Test drive a Tesla, I did. Burning stuff is So 1800’s.


#76

When I can buy my own windmill that powers my whole house 24 hours a day I’ll be sold. Not having to pay a power bill because it’s free in my back yard will be worth the initial cost. Until there is an AFFORDABLE combo of wind and solar along with the batteries to run a 5 ton AC unit off grid in the Alabama heat 24/7 it’s all a pipe dream.


#77

That is all available. Just a question of how big windmill, how many solar panels and how large battery bank you need to power your 5 ton A/C.


#78

The payback on grid-tied rooftop solar and current heat pump technology for heating and cooling is only about 7 years in states that have net metering. It only adds about $10,000 to the cost of a new $200,000 house considering that there is no need to install a boiler and an AC unit. There are no moving parts and cost is continually dropping.

I doubt that mass backyard wind will ever be feasible. First, you’d have to live in a windy place, and then there are too many moving parts.


#79

Are you offgrid? If not, how much are you paying per KW? I’m seeing grade A UL panels with a 25 year warranty for .25 cents a watt…

That’s $2,500 for 10Kw of panels. Google’s “project sunroof” will tell you the suitability of your roof for solar. Guessing average 8 hrs sun… gives you 80 KWH per day. I reminder some pics you posted a few years ago on a newbuild, I’m guessing you’re not too scared of a little wiring project…

Do the math, it’s not a pipe dream, it’s real,


#80

I’m not off grid but I need to run a 4 ton AC year around. Where I live from April to October its 100 degrees in the shade with 90% humidity and doesn’t get much better at night. My AC kicks on at around 0700 and runs almost continuously until about 2000. I would probably need to cover my house and all available yard space with panels. Then I would probably need a garage and back yard full of batteries to run the AC all day.

My solution is saying to hell with solar panels and moving to Washington state next year. I’m gonna upgrade my location and wx situation.