Log Books


#1

Can any of you fine gentlemen (and I use that term loosely) cite the CFR, or International Equivalent that pertains to the keeping of an Engine Room Logbook (rough, smooth, or otherwise)?

Other than it being good standard practice to keep up with what happens in the E/R, I haven’t been able to find anything to refer to.

Any help would be appreciated…and thanks ahead of time…


#2

46CFR 78.17

46CFR 78.37-1 through 78.37-5

Hopefully, this helps you out.

Brian

[quote=El Capitan;10167]Can any of you fine gentlemen (and I use that term loosely) cite the CFR, or International Equivalent that pertains to the keeping of an Engine Room Logbook (rough, smooth, or otherwise)?

Other than it being good standard practice to keep up with what happens in the E/R, I haven’t been able to find anything to refer to.

Any help would be appreciated…and thanks ahead of time…
[/quote]


#3

[quote=Capt Brian;10189]46CFR 78.17

46CFR 78.37-1 through 78.37-5

Hopefully, this helps you out.

Brian[/quote]

Brian - Thanks for the input.

The problem is, that I’ve found plenty of these references within the CFR’s, but nothing concrete that say’s “The Chief Engineer will keep a Rough Log, and make the following entries within it”. As I said, short of just being good practice, where does the law stipulate that he even has to keep “a” log?

Obviously the owners want him to keep record of maintenance issues, overhauls, and oil changes, but what about the day to day activities?

Thanks again everyone…


#4

El Captain - I understand the “frustration”. I have looked for information about what should be documented in the wheelhouse log book, but have found nothing there either. My belief is the day starts at 0000 and ends at 2400. I also believe that entries in the log book should be actual times and not rounded to the quarter hour. But, as I say “when in Rome, do as the Romans do”. I have to do what has been done on the boat as implemented by the Master.


#5

I’ve never seen a CFR that states engineers must keep a log of routine operations which doesn’t mean such a CFR doesn’t exist. However, most insurance companies and classification societies do expect machinery log to be kept. Not having a log book would raise suspicion.
A question arose recently regarding the log included within one companies ISM program. They had a daily ‘boat log’ which was on the computer, a copy of which was printed each day and put into a binder. They actually thought this would suffice for an official log.


#6

In the course of my work as an adjuster and surveyor, you wouldn’t believe what I run across as “logs”. Often the deck log of a tug (working offshore) will state something to the effect of: “0000 to 2400: Working as directed”. And that is often difficult to decipher, since neither penmanship or spelling seem to be high on the qualifications of the watch keepers. Engine logs, if they are kept, are a whole other issue. Often, on the short haul tugs that work up and down Bayou LaFourche, there is no engineer. Just a captain, co-captain and two deckhands.