Large OSV Master to Master Inland AGT


#82

They didn’t change the wording.

This is from the 2008:
46 CFR 10.104
"Chief mate means the deck officer next in seniority to the master and upon whom the command of the vessel will fall in the event of the incapacity of the master."


#83

§14.307 Entries on certificate of discharge.
(a) Each master or individual in charge of a vessel must, for each merchant mariner being discharged from the vessel, prepare a certificate of discharge and two copies…


#84

Maybe Mr. Cavo can explain why it’s not done in the Gulf.


#85

Incorrect, they must hold a management level STCW to gain credit for the service.


#86

They added wording to cover vessels that had no provision for Chief Mate in their COI.


#87

Citation please.


#88

Here’s the current 46 CFR 10.107

“Chief mate means the deck officer next in rank to the master and upon whom the command of the vessel will fall in the event of incapacity of the master.”


#89

This is how.

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§ 10.232 Sea service.
(a)Documenting sea service.

(1) Sea service may be documented in various forms such as certificates of discharge, pilotage service and billing forms, and service letters or other official documents from marine companies signed by the owner, operator, master, or chief engineer of the vessel. The Coast Guard must be satisfied as to the authenticity and acceptability of all evidence of experience or training presented.


#90

Since when? You can (and could) go straight from second mate to Master Unlimited with 12 months of sea time as Chief Mate.


#91

§14.307 Entries on certificate of discharge.
(a) Each master or individual in charge of a vessel must, for each merchant mariner being discharged from the vessel, prepare a certificate of discharge and two copies…


#92

BTW, we’ve had this discussion on this forum before and no one can conclusively say how OSVs aren’t required to issue discharges. Everything points to the fact that they’re supposed to and the USCG just doesn’t give a shit.


#93

Okay found it. In the December 2013 Federal Register, directly prior to the CFR revisions.

Where the mariner holds a management-level
credential, and fills the position as
mate, and the position meets the
definition of chief mate found in
§ 10.107, then that service will be
credited as chief mate.

Maybe JD Cavo can weigh in on how it panned out in implementation. The wording is also found in the preamble to the CFR’S, I knew I wasn’t taking crazy pills. Way I read it, if you want CM time you need a Management Level STCW


#94

it appears the CFR’s are contradictory.

The one I can’t figure out is Articles. Any vessel over 50 tons…going to a non adjoining state…is supposed to sign articles…unless fishing or some other such where you share out.
Fourchon to Tampa, Articles…Fourchon to Brazil, Articles


#95

Don’t they mean state as defined in the dictionary: a sovereign nation, not a US State.


#96

Nope,it’s spelled out, and differentiates foreign ports,fromsm states.

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/46/14.201


#97

“between a port in one State and a port in another State other than an adjoining State”.
OK, that’s a bit more precise than “…going to an adjoining state…” .and makes more sense as I wasn’t thinking tugs.


#98

:man_shrugging:


#99

Every vessel of any significant size and value should have an MMC reader which reads the MMC when a mariner signs on and reports the rank signed on as to the USCG. The software should then compares the mariners’s endorsements with the requirements specified in the vessel’s COI. This system confirms that the mariner is serving legally, and that the vessel is legally manned. The USCG immediately gets a record. Same with sign off. The mariner’s “seatime account” at the USCG is immediately credited with the seatime. The mariner can logon anytime to check the status of his seatime account, and download or print the data.

No more phony seatime letters, no more companies refusing to issue letters, no more discharges to bother with, or for companies to refuse to issue.


#100

And getting that letter, at least where I work, became nigh on impossible when oil started to crash. They didn’t want to lose everyone with upper level licenses and put the kibosh in issuing them. Course, with the way the USMM is in general right now, they needn’t have bothered.


#101

Mid to noon watch. Only other mate with a masters license. Training a new junior mate on my watch. Duties a Chief Mate would perform.