In Case You Think Things are Bad Now


#21

Not so sure about voting party lines… I’m also sure that you know the two major parties have had a paradigm shift in the parties platforms throughout their history i.e. Southern democrat and republicans being the party of Lincoln.


#22

Sure you can! It’s one of the main reasons for the financial innovation known as fractional reserve lending. Europe’s royalty was sick and tired of always having to raise real money from taxing the peasantry to fund the various military adventures. Waging war with no or very limited money to pay your armies really curtails dreams of world domination and delusions of grandeur. It’s freaking awesome when you can simply conjure up the dough out of thin air and just go for it! So what’s a couple of trillion $$$ or so in rubber checks between BFF’s? Shrub just took the ball he was given by the system and ran with it like OJ through the airport. Totally juked and head-faked everybody in the USA and the “Coalition of the Willing.” Too bad the Taliban and the Iraqis didn’t really go for it after all. But, if a few “Mistakes were made,” so what? Empire’s a messy business!

Obviously there’s a lot more to the story than that, but that’s the root of it. Leaders of nations, elected or not, just love that easy money, and so do the voters/peasants.


#23

The State can’t print forever. Sooner or later there must be some sort of prosperity or the citizens standard of living can’t be maintained and social order deteriorates. Sound familiar? The period leading up to the French Revolution is a classic example of the failure of this type of system.


#24

[QUOTE=lm1883;188116]The period leading up to the French Revolution is a classic example of the failure of this type of system.[/QUOTE]

Or in our case (the USA) Germany of the 1930s is a much much closer comparison. We are FUBAR and the masses are rallying around a total whackjob.


#25

[QUOTE=Steamer;188122]Or in our case (the USA) Germany of the 1930s is a much much closer comparison. We are FUBAR and the masses are rallying around a total whackjob.[/QUOTE]

The German whackjob had a reason for being an amoral nightmare-come-true: he was a vet of Ypres. Donald’s trauma is more mysterious.


#26

Half of the masses, the other half are lining up to support the bankers surrogate, who would perpetuate the system that is driving the middle class into poverty. 6 of one, half a dozen of another.


#27

I think your being a little overly dramatic. I firmly believe Ms Clinton is more apt to start a war than Mr Trump. If your interested, it would be worth investigating Victoria Nuland’s role in the Ukrainian coup and her ties to Clinton.


#28

[QUOTE=lm1883;188132]I think your being a little overly dramatic. I firmly believe Ms Clinton is more apt to start a war than Mr Trump. If your interested, it would be worth investigating Victoria Nuland’s role in the Ukrainian coup and her ties to Clinton.[/QUOTE]

She’s always been a hawk. I’m not defending her.


#29

You are correct.

If you keep the “printing presses” blasting away at the Treasury sooner or later the economy cannibalizes itself via hyper-inflation or compressionary-deflation. Either way it eventually comes apart.

The long-term pursuit of a zero-percent or near-zero interest rate policy by the Fed, which in some places in the world has even gone into negative interest rates, tells you that things are seriously bollixed up, both down in the engine room and up on the bridge.

Mark Twain said “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.” Shades of the French Revolution? You betcha’! as Caribou Barbie would say. One commonality being that the elites then largely never saw the unwinding of their status quo, and the subsequent bloodbath, coming, and our elites today seem equally clueless of what can happen and how quickly things can change when in an obvious condition of instability.

Weimar Germany? Check! Scared, angry and otherwise disenfranchised people will reliably rally behind a charismatic (or not-so charismatic) strongman who promises better times and maybe even some sweet revenge on whoever can be painted as the enemy, before driving everyone over the cliff.

So pick your poison: a possibly psychotic and parasitic “businessman” who specializes in the art of strategic bankruptcy and stiffing the contractors, or a conscienceless war-hawk and unapologetic career shill for what has clearly become a parasitic banking system. And both appear to be very accomplished pathological liars.

Isn’t freedom of choice bloody awesome?

A none-of-the-above option that would force a full stop and re-boot of the process would be a handy thing to have right about now.


#30

[QUOTE=lm1883;188132]I think your being a little overly dramatic. I firmly believe Ms Clinton is more apt to start a war than Mr Trump. If your interested, it would be worth investigating Victoria Nuland’s role in the Ukrainian coup and her ties to Clinton.[/QUOTE]

Not nearly as interesting as Trump campaign manager, Paul Manafort’s, relations to the Putin drone Yanukovych, ousted in said Ukrainian coup. I think his Trumpness would most likely start a war, offering that the US maybe won’t fully honor NATO commitments would invite further Crimea style adventurism, or worse.


#31

Maybe, but Crimea is a bad example. They are 80% ethnic Russian there and were part of Russia (USSR) since the 1870s (taken from Turkey). Brezhnev gifted the Crimea to Ukraine in 1954 while part of the USSR so Ukraine’s claim to the territory is on shaky legs. Every Crimean I’ve met, and there has been more than a few, are happy to be part of Russia and tell me that this is the preferable outcome. The Crimean people desire to be part of Russia, voted to do so, we should respect that.

FWIW Yanukovych was the democratically elected leader of the Ukraine and since he has been deposed, Ukraine (now a failed state) is in much worse shape.

How much blood and treasure is the Ukraine worth? Because we are running short on treasure.


#32

[QUOTE=lm1883;188147]Maybe, but Crimea is a bad example. They are 80% ethnic Russian there and were part of Russia (USSR) since the 1870s (taken from Turkey). Brezhnev gifted the Crimea to Ukraine in 1954 while part of the USSR so Ukraine’s claim to the territory is on shaky legs. Every Crimean I’ve met, and there has been more than a few, are happy to be part of Russia and tell me that this is the preferable outcome. The Crimean people desire to be part of Russia, voted to do so, we should respect that.

FWIW Yanukovych was the democratically elected leader of the Ukraine and since he has been deposed, Ukraine (now a failed state) is in much worse shape.

How much blood and treasure is the Ukraine worth? Because we are running short on treasure.[/QUOTE]

it helps that the Russians replaced the tartars they kicked out… The Crimea has changed hands multiple times since its initial annexing by Catherine the Great with support of Austro Hungarian empire. There is no historic claim before that, so it’s just Russian imperialism. Of course it was a strategic goal to maintain the sea access, hence its continual focus of attention by Russia. Populating with Russians is a helpful means of legitimacy, on one occasion, Russia crossed the border out of a proclaimed regard for Eastern Orthodox Christians so it’s not a particularly original story. But Ukraine was established, there is a rule of law, and the insistence and invasion to counter the loss of the vassal state is wrong. Sanctions over blood, and buffing up NATO is the best way to avoid further bloodshed.


#33

Misread it.


#34

[QUOTE=lm1883;188176]Misread it.[/QUOTE]

Thats good of you to say, I was wondering how the 1700s Englishmen you mention were into buffing up NATO.


#35

Singapore is in the process of updating the way it elects a President: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...y/3061564.html

Wouldn’t it be nice if the US had done something similar??


#36

Sad news from Singapore: Former President S.R.Nathan died today: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...r/3064846.html

He was a popular President and a long serving Civil Servant, but never held political office: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...ndard#cxrecs_s

If I was still in Singapore I would have paid my respect in person. Now can only do so from here.

BTW This has nothing to do with the above post about changes to the way Presidents are elected, or with the subject of this thread, but I did not find anywhere else to put it.


#37

No thanks our constitution is just fine.


#38

[QUOTE=Fraqrat;189365]No thanks our constitution is just fine.[/QUOTE]

Yes it was for the conditions that existed at the time. Even the best of Laws needs to be updated from time to time.
At least you could add something to ensure that any candidate for President had the required qualifications to handle the job.


#39

Nope the Constitution is just fine like it is. I wouldn’t expect you to understand. The only problem with it is…


#40

[QUOTE=ombugge;189366]At least you could add something to ensure that any candidate for President had the required qualifications to handle the job.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, that’s right, we gotta make sure the next president is an experienced community activist 'cause that’s been working out just great.