Health at sea


#1

How do you get grounded to the earth if you aren’t ever allowed to walk on the deck barefoot? Even if so it’s covered with epoxy. And all the handrails, everything is covered with epoxy. There’s a lot of health benefits to grounding to the earth, including better sleep, stress reduction, ache and pain reduction, psychological benefits, the list goes on and on. It seems impossible however to get grounded on most traditional ships.
Has anyone found a solution to this… or even care?


#2

My Tomato garden in pots on the bridge wing is both stress relieving and delicious…


#3

Yes, but this leads to the question: is your tomato garden charged with native ions from the earth? Fresh tomatoes are good though


#4

When I’m feeling in the need I walk aft near the stack and take a deep breath of stack gas. Makes me feel like a champ.


#5

Lovely! I will have to look into it and see if exhaust gas has negative ions…


#6

Try one of these…

Just make sure you hook it up correctly and make sure you do the PM on it because as they say, “it’s an ill wind that blows no good”.
http://www.nytimes.com/1981/10/06/science/ions-created-by-winds-may-prompt-changes-in-emotional-states.html

Some folks think I’m pretty negative but it doesn’t seem to be helping their outlook on life any. Maybe they’d be better off breathing stack gas too.

I hear sometimes doing volunteer work can make you feel more grounded though.


#7

“I hear sometimes doing volunteer work can make you feel more grounded though.”

Eep! Looks like someone did not read the article.

It is a biological/electrical process…not a feeling.

Nevertheless that would explain why I have seen some of the air inonzers on some ships.
Maybe someone before me was on to something. Or maybe they just wanted fresh air? Either way, it is neither practical nor convenient lug one of those around…


#8

I hear sometimes doing volunteer work can make you feel more grounded though.

“That’s a joke, I say that’s a joke son”

  • Foghorn Leghorn

#9

I’m a physician (inactive license as Surgeon in the USMM), not an electrical engineer, so these thoughts are tentative, not authoritative. But I think the ocean exchanges negative ions with the rest of the environment similar to dry land.

Lightening has been shown to be the result of a buildup of (-) charge in the earth, relative to the clouds full of water droplets which have a (+) charge due to electrons being stripped off during their violent uplift. This eventually leads to enough potential to cause a breakdown in the insulating properties of the atmosphere and current flows suddenly and violently…in an earth to cloud direction contrary to popular myth.

As any mariner knows, lightening certainly can be seen at sea, both between the water and clouds, and sometimes through vessels afloat on it. In fact, static discharges of less than explosive degree (St. Elmo’s fire) are associated with ships in most people’s minds, though they occur on land as well.

I have no idea how the (-) ion potential of the sea compares to the land, but certainly the flux is there. So, if you’re on a metal ship, just make sure your bunk is grounded! If you’re hull is made of something relatively non-conductive, ground your mattress pad to your through hull bonding system that protects your metal parts in contact with the sea from electrolysis. That should give you all the (-) ion flux you need. Now, will it really do you some good? In my medical opinion, the jury’s still out on that one. Studies reported in that article are encouraging but not enough to persuade me yet.


#10

It all depends on how the grounding wire on the battery charger is fitted. . . .


#11

@cmakin
I realize now why you are on this forum all the time despite having a desk job…But I will keep that relevation to myself :grinning:

KpChief at least had somewhat of an intelligent answer. You could at least try…

Never the less I have found a way

A dieu


#12

BEST POST EVER!!! All this time…I had no idea


#13

I don’t, because"earthing" is bullshit.


#14

Please, give me the honors. . . . I check the forum when I get into the office and am starting to flange up my day. Most days I give it little thought thereafter. I am glad that you think that you have so much insight into my daily doings. Flying a desk is only a small portion of how I spend my time. . . To be taken to task by you regarding intelligence is its own special irony. . .