Einstein & Relativity theory fading


#42

76 Hz, sorry. Two and a half megawatts. And this was the little one, they never built the big one.


#43

Interesting. But I’d think that by the time you got to a strain rate measured in parts of a second and not days, that the earthquake would be already happening.


#44

For charged particles yes

Between two charged plates it looks like this.

, capacitor%20index

In an EM wave it’s not going to like either of those examples.


#45

I think that there can be hours, day, or maybe years of strain before a rupture. The tectonic plates move in mm/year, they don’t exactly break the speed of sound.


#46

I think that’s the key. An EM wave is not like what’s happening around a wire. I don’t know why they are different, but it seems to be the case that they are. I reckon the next step is to figure out why free EM has different field geometry than that caused by current in (or on the skin of) a wire.


#47

Agree. So what will you actually be detecting? A static electrical field that increases over the course of a year? Wouldn’t it be shorted out by the mass of earth?

I could see planting pairs of electrodes deep in the rock near a fault…


#48

People think they can hear these ULFs and ELFs from burying antenna in the soil and using a sort of ham set. Other people think that what is being heard is auroral activity. Some postulate that there’s a circuit between the Van Allen belts and the moho. Very interesting, and at the same time, kinda woo woo.

Reckon the thing to do is to record the broadcasts with good time stamps and then try to correlated them with other data, like earthquakes and sunspots and lighting and things. Best to have three geographically spaced listening stations with recording and timestamps so that triangulation could be done. Not that I have put any thought into it at all…


#49

This is well beyond me, but as far as electrical fields near AC wires, maybe doesn’t matter that much. It’s of interest in antennas maybe, or high voltage wires? Anyway found this on the interwebs

I think the issue is that while a powerline does produce fluctuating EM fields, that is not the same as EM “waves” or radiation. This distinction is summarized on the wikipedia page about near vs far fields. In short, the two wires on a powerline have opposite phase, so that two adjacent pieces form an oscillating dipole, and we’d expect dipole radiation to escape from the powerline. However, the all these dipoles interfere with one another (because they are out of phase) and so the field that escapes to infinity is very small.

Of course none of this is going to speed up fixing my porch screens.


#50

Typically one of those wires will be tied to earth at some point.


#51

Just a quick note to say thatt I have clearly been hanging out in the wrong part of the forum, because this is where the interesting things are being discussed.


#52

it’s engineering, what else would you expect?


#53

What we need is an old-timey radio officer to chime in.

Sparky this is gCaptain. Radio check? Over.


#54

i have a gen class permit but refrain from posting my call here (KD7—) in the interest of anonymity. And yes, i’ve been following the conversation on fields but my interest is more hypothetical and futuristic so didn’t get too involved, did watch the videos, (thx guys).
sparky?